the DR650 thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by sleepywombat, May 1, 2006.

  1. NordieBoy

    NordieBoy Armature speller

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    Weird.
    0.47 front and 7.6 rear gives me (85kg) the correct static and race sag settings going by Ned and James's book.
  2. TrophyHunter

    TrophyHunter Long timer

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    SkunkWizard - I like the low front fender and if I had a road going only or mild dirt road DR, I'd go with it. I've seen your metalwork firsthand - there's some in my garage - and it's first rate.

    Good to see you around here still.
  3. SkunkWizard

    SkunkWizard recycle crime scene tape

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    I've always been lurking, I try to keep my post count low and my ride count high.
    Metalwork is my weakpoint, I do it for a change of pace & relaxation.
    Composites are my deal and it keeps me stupid busy during racing season.

    I have a new project for the DR in the works, I can't wait for some free time. It involves Stainless Steel and carbon fiber.
  4. ER70S-2

    ER70S-2 Long timer

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  5. acesandeights

    acesandeights Asperger

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    Well, I do know that you and I don't weigh the same. If you weighed only slightly more, or had your bike loaded you'd probably be using the same rear spring as me. I always thought both the front and rear of my stock bike was way under sprung and now it seems more balanced. I did go up a lot on the front if you think about it in terms of percentage (.40 stock springs to .70 aftermarket); although I have to wonder if the progressive front springs would be similar to a heavier spring as they cycle through the range (I don't know). So, maybe because I now have straight rate springs I go with a higher rate; whereas the stock spring feels like a higher spring rate as it cycles? I was going to measure my sag, but I froze my ass off putting on some new Barkbusters, so I'm taking a bourbon (Bulleit) break.

    You went up about 15% front and rear, and I went up much more in the front. I'm wondering if the progressive to straight rate means anything in the reasoning.
  6. Rob.G

    Rob.G Mostly Harmless

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    I got my forks apart today with only a medium of mess. ;)

    I noticed, comparing to the photo spread on the ProCycle site that Jeff pointed me to, that my damper rods don't have the nylon cup on either side. I've verified it's not stuck in the fork tube. Is this going to be a problem?

    I also noticed there are no rebound holes in the rod, unless you count the single, super tiny (not even 1mm) hole up near the top.

    AND, whoever did the original "lowering" on this bike put the spacer and the top-out spring in the wrong way according to both the ProCycle picture spread and the paper instructions from RaceTech. I doubt it made any difference, but it was worth noting.

    Now to go start drilling.

    Rob
  7. mrprez

    mrprez KJ4WMZ

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    I finished mine a few months ago but I'm still not happy with the rear shock. The slow speed damping doesn't feel like it has changed at all. I still get that pogo stick feeling when riding on surface streets. I haven't been able to take it out on any dirt stuff as yet. Did yours tighten up enough where you don't feel like it is riding on just the spring?
  8. Rob.G

    Rob.G Mostly Harmless

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    New question... how do you guys go about deburring these holes? I got 'em all drilled, but now they have sharp edges, which the instructions say are a no-no.

    I have a Dremel... suppose I could use that.

    Rob
  9. acesandeights

    acesandeights Asperger

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    I didn't drill mine (someone else did), but typically I just run the drill in and out a few times and it cleans up the edges.
  10. acesandeights

    acesandeights Asperger

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    Yes, it's stiff in fact, but doesn't feel like it's riding on the spring. That's how it felt in stock form like it was riding solely on the spring.

    I rode again today and went over a little dirt jump the kids around the neighborhood use on their bicycles. I didn't jump it due to all the mud, just up and over a few times as if it were "whoops". My bike follows the terrain really well. Both tires stay planted to the ground. I know what you mean by the pogo because that's what my stock suspension felt like, but a really soft pogo stick. Now it's a stiffly, firmly planted, completely connected to the ground feeling. I'm still not sure whether it's a little too stiff, but I'm almost thinking riding for the last 18+ months with the stock suspension has made me forget what a good set up should feel like. Mine feels like the compression is stiff and the rebound just sticks the bike to the ground...no pogo. Hope that helps. BTW, when are the tires coming :D again!?
  11. neo1piv014

    neo1piv014 ADV in training

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    Just some more carb tuning questions for the board here. This one is fairly straight forward:
    is the white spacer supposed to sit right up against the bottom of the needle clip? When I took the spacer off my old needle and put it on this one, it goes almost all the way up to where the clip is, but then gets wedged into place very solidly. I wound up having to use a decent amount of force to get the damn thing off again. I also noticed that I have a very small washer that sits right below my white spacer. Is this factory, or was someone trying to tune the carb before, and I should take it off now that I have the adjustable needle?

    Switching from my old, bent needle to the non-USA OEM needle did get rid of some of the surging I had been experiencing, but I think I'm running way too rich. My fuel economy is now down to the 35-36 range, and that's cruising 65-75 on the highway with some small around town trips. I've noticed that I've lost a smidgen of power, and there is some surging at low RPMs around maybe 1/3 or 1/4 throttle that doesn't feel quite right. Looking at Derek's chart for it, that falls within the realm of clip position, and I'm thinking that if that spacer isn't where it's supposed to be, I'm running insanely too rich. My fuel economy has been a problem since I first got this bike, so if it really was this simple the whole time, I'm going to feel like a dolt.
  12. canoli

    canoli human

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    Not from round these parts.
    What are you using to flush/bleed the system and how long did it take? Local dealer wants $99 p/hr for service and I'm not about to get ripped off so I was going to try and do this myself.


    Thanks,
    Canoli
  13. motolab

    motolab Long timer

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    Yes.
    It's good that some force is required to get the spacer all the way against the clip. This will help prevent the needle from spinning during operation, which otherwise causes needle wear (see the needle on the left here: www.moto-lab.com/gallery/view?itemid=306).
    Leave it out.
    Indeed.

    Remind me though, how many miles are there on the carb, and have you already inspected the slide guide, emulsion tube, slide and float needle for wear/damage?

    Regards,

    Derek
  14. JagLite

    JagLite Long timer

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    That is probably their one hour minimum charge? :huh

    It took me maybe 5 minutes to do the rear and a couple minutes longer on the front.

    I bought a speed bleeder at NAPA (auto parts store) for around $5 or so.
    Just a simple check valve with a piece of tubing on each end.
    Loosen the bleed bolt, stick the tube on it with the other end in a drain cup and start pumping.
    Add more fluid as the reservoir allows until only clean and clear fluid is coming out.
    Tighten the bleed screw and check the feel.
    Hard as rock for me with ss lines.

    I probably took me longer to type this than it took to do one wheel, but I type slowly...
  15. JagLite

    JagLite Long timer

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    Yes, and if you noticed in my post, the Cogent shock shaft assembly without spring is only $295.
    Still a better deal than $339.99.

    I do not know what the differences are between the Raceteck and the Cogent assemblies are.
    Since Cogent is an authorized Racetech shop, they would be able to explain the differences.
    One big advantage is that Rick at Cogent rides a DR650 so he knows the bike well.

    Either way you can't go wrong, they will both make a huge improvement over stock. :clap
  16. neo1piv014

    neo1piv014 ADV in training

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    As of today, there's 12,445 miles on the bike, and I'm assuming that the factory carb is the one on there. The PO had stated that he put a DJ kit on the bike, but the needle definitely wasn't a DJ needle. The plug for the mixture screw had been removed, and the airbox had been opened up, however, so something had been done to it. I didn't notice anything that immediately stuck out as being worn out compared to the pictures on the BST Bible thread, but I've also not seen any brand new ones in person either.

    Assuming I get the spacer forced up to where the the clip is, I would raise the clip position to lean things out a bit, correct?
  17. acesandeights

    acesandeights Asperger

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    I just measured the Race Tech shock shaft assembly and it is larger in diameter than the stock shaft. I was told that before buying, but didn't know until I measured it myself. So, it's a larger, stronger shaft with more bearing surface. I don't know what other difference(s) there might be.
  18. Adv Grifter

    Adv Grifter on the road o'dreams

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    Thumper Dan and Richo ... waste of band width to quote back all the photos from the original post. We've all seen them ... no need to RE-POST them.
    Might I suggest you go back and EDIT them out of your posts?
    Bad internet manners. Leave the pics OFF on replies ... especially when they are 4- X Large ones.
    Cheers!:freaky
  19. Mambo Dave

    Mambo Dave Backyard Adventurer

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    Like Jaglite just said... it's too easy for that if you know to just not let air get into the system.

    The only tools I used were the vice grips to loosen the bleeder screw, and some old piece of clear tubing/hose I found to guide the dripping fluid down into a oil catch pan (and to keep the fluid off of the rotors).

    The rear - bleeds itself. Unbolt the rear brake reservoir to have easy access, loosen the bleed screw until it's dripping out, and just keep adding fresh fluid in the resevior to make sure it doesn't get low enough to suck air in. Toward the end tighten up the bleed screw/bolt/nipple, then top off the fluid and replace the reservoir.

    The front - it wouldn't all just gravity-drip out, so I would pump the brake lever with my left hand while loosening and tightening the nipple/bleeder with the right hand to push old fluid out (the brake lever pushed the fluid out, close the bleeder, pump the lever, loosen the bleeder, hold lever down, tighten the bleeder, repeat a bunch of times).

    Really only took the minutes that Jaglite says it does.

    I used blue loctite on the two front top reservoir screws as an anti-seize since I have had those screws seize on another bike of mine (and since I couldn't find my real anti-seize), and ... ooh yeah ... most imperative - blue loctite on the 10mm bolt that holds the rear reservoir on since it was way loose! It would have fallen out soon.

    ---

    It takes probably 15 minutes, total, from gathering the tools to finishing it up. Pay me ... $50 and I'll do it for ya :D

    That's damned near a 49.5% discount!

    -----

    for more of an idea of all my special bleeder tools, here is a shot of the rear while it was gravity-bleeding itself:

    [​IMG]

    Here the vice grips that I used on the bleeder are gently holding the tubing down to keep the tubing's end from falling out of the catch-basin. I didn't want brake fluid on my walk way.
  20. Adv Grifter

    Adv Grifter on the road o'dreams

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    I used a Rat tail file and emery cloth. It takes a while. Make sure you clean all metal debris out. Rinse out well.