the DR650 thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by sleepywombat, May 1, 2006.

  1. belleringer

    belleringer standing on the pegs

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2011
    Oddometer:
    148
    Location:
    dallas, but a long suffering dolphins fan
    mine did the same at around 6k, i just replaced the fiber and steel plates with barnett plates and heavy duty springs ... what a difference, i though the stock springs were worn, but no they were fine ... i bought the bike at about 4.5k and it was pretty much trashed .... i noticed the clutch slippage once i did the AB mod and rejetted .... the old clutch plates were not in too bad a shape except the outer plate was completely gone down to the metal which scored the 'primary clutch plate' like bad brakes on a hoopty car ... i didn't have the primary plate, so i ordered one (now i have two) but had a trip to NM so i reinstalled and went out .... i intend on putting the new primary in this weekend, but the bike ran great and the barnett plates just hooked up .... it will be interesting to see if i destroyed the outer fiber plate due to the scored primary ... if so, i can just buy one fiber plate and be jake ... good luck ...
  2. teaguenotes

    teaguenotes ...

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2013
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    San Francisco
    I was changing my front sprocket yesterday. I took off the old one and put the new one back on. When I was tightening the new sprocket on all the bolt heads snapped off. So I went about putting the old one back one...question is I went to the hardware store and found exact same size bolts, except they are allen headed instead of hex. I got them as tight as I could with a big allen wrench and some blue threadlock. I'm going to canada and back from San Francisco on the bike over the next week and a half and want to make sure I'm not committing any big safety hazard. I'm a noob at working on my own bike. Opinions welcomed. Thanks
  3. DRT

    DRT Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2011
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    Location:
    Boston
    I recently purchased a second rear wheel for a quick street/dirt conversion system. The trouble is the wheel is missing 2 spokes. Do any of you guys know where I can buy just 2 spokes? I can't find anywhere that will sell me less than a full set.
    Thanks for any replies
  4. RobTheRigger

    RobTheRigger Thread Killer

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    How's the Pingel petcock compare to the Raptor petcock?
  5. DRT

    DRT Adventurer

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    Jun 26, 2011
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    That setup looks safe to me. Those bolts don't require a huge amount of torque, they aren't really stressed, they only prevent the sprocket holder from spinning. With the amount of loctite it appears you used I think you are safe.
    Also, Lube that chain up before you go, it looks dry!!
  6. RobTheRigger

    RobTheRigger Thread Killer

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    DRT, I would recommend redoing the whole wheel. In my experience, it's a "cry now or cry later," kind of thing.
  7. DRT

    DRT Adventurer

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    Why redo the whole thing? The wheel looks in really good strait condition. I think the spokes got broken by the bike being moved by a crane or something attached poorly to the wheel.
  8. Kommando

    Kommando Long timer

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    Unless you over-tightened the new bolts too, you should be fine for now.

    Www.procycle.us, www.Bikebandit.com, Suzuki dealers, and other places sell the correct size, style, and grade of bolt for the long term.

    You may want to get a service manual for torque specs, and a torque wrench. Make sure to follow the directions for storage of the torque wrench.

    Be very careful when torquing fasteners on a moto. A lot of parts on motos are aluminum. They strip/break easily. Mild steel and stainless fasteners in small sizes can strip or gall easily too. Start all threaded fasteners with your fingers, instead of with a tool.
  9. BergDonk

    BergDonk Long timer

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    An often overlooked aspect of getting pinch flats when you have low tyre pressures is suspension setup. The tyre carcass does a lot of the suspension for us, and if the suspension has too much high speed compression damping, ie doesn't move fast enough when hitting rocks and roots etc, the the force of impact is taken by the tyre carcass and not the suspension, and a pinch flat happens. So if suspension setup is 'right', you can run lower pressures than otherwise.

    Obviously tyre carcass stiffness also plays a role too.

    Tube thickness makes a difference too. The 4 mm ones are very hard to pinch. Also using lots of talc when fitting tube and tyre, so they move independently inside, reduces the chance a bit.

    I can run down to 13 psi on rocks etc, but usually leave them around 18 for all sorts of riding on my DR.

    10 psi on my Berg at speed on snot is fine, but my suspensions work :D

    So what's the answer to the OP's question, dunno.
  10. Emmbeedee

    Emmbeedee Procrastinators

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2008
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    Location:
    Near Ottawa, ON, Canada
    Starter Rebuild Kit

    I don't actually need one yet but I spotted this on eBay and decided that for $25, + $8 in shipping, I'd give it a try:

    [​IMG]

    It looks like reasonable quality components, and came packed in a sturdy VHS tape box. It's even got the bushing for the cover end. Not sure I can post the eBay ad details here but if anyone wants to know who it's from, PM me for more info.
  11. Mambo Dave

    Mambo Dave Backyard Adventurer

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    Never seen a Pingel, but the Pingel seems nice and plush as a part, the Raptor is just a good solid OEM petcock.

    The one that comes with the Acerbis tank is a plastic lever. I don't like it as I've had more than one bike that the petcock became harder and harder to turn (due to... ethanol and the gaskets?), and on all of them I can imagine this petcock lever breaking if I would have to apply that amount of force to it.
  12. RobTheRigger

    RobTheRigger Thread Killer

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    I guess I should have expounded a little on my answer. Sorry 'bout that. My reasoning is that the existing spokes are a certain age and have been held at tension. Once you introduce new spokes that have never held tension, you start running into a never-ending battle of truing the wheel as the new spokes stretch, etc. If someone with more or different experience(s) can chime in, I'm all ears. YMMV and all that. :deal
  13. IndyChizzle

    IndyChizzle Hoping my skill exceeds my horsepower

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2010
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    Location:
    Indianapolis, IN by Kessler and Michigan Rd.
    Guys,
    Thanks for all the inspiration, I just bought a DR650 with 2 sets of wheels (supermoto and regular)!
    Sincerely,
    Chuck

    [​IMG]
  14. rpet

    rpet Awesometown

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    I wouldn't go below 20psi without UHD tubes. But I use UHD tubes. :deal
  15. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    Fort Collins, Colorado
    bridgestone ultra heavy duty tubes (4mm) do have some downsides.

    they run hotter inside the tire when used on loaded bikes running fast on the hiway. seen one 1st hand explode inside the tire because of this.

    you can not get a patch to stick to one if you are down to that.

    they make the bike feel heavy because of the weight

    i've switched over bridgestone heavy duty (3mm) tubes as a great compromise. they are thick for protection yet can still be patched, run cooler and don't make the steering heavy.

    http://www.rockymountainatvmc.com/p/44/86/176/864/-/287/Bridgestone-Heavy-Duty-Motorcycle-Tube
    100-18" fits perfect in a 130-17" rear tire.

  16. BergDonk

    BergDonk Long timer

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    Yep. I tend to run normal HD on the DR too as they are easier to carry spares for, although I think I have a UHD in the front ATM. I've heard of the heat issues, but have no experience of any. The boxes on my bash plate are too small for a rear UHD tube. Plus I tend not to vary my DR pressures much once underway. I would if I had an onboard facility to change them on the fly like some 4 and more wheelers have.

    I don't notice the weight of UHD tubes in the DR. Its not only steering effects due to greater rotating mass and gyroscopic forces to overcome, its also unsprung weight so suspension is affected too. I can tell the difference in my Berg though, but accept it because I like to run the lower pressures for traction both ends. Then I have issues with tyres spinning on the rim even with rim locks. Tried a Tubliss on the front once, manily for its beadlock function, but that failed catastrophically and sent me to hospital, so only in my Scorpa now.
  17. Mambo Dave

    Mambo Dave Backyard Adventurer

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    I'll tell ya though, since we're on the topic - the idea of thicker heavier tubes creating more heat intrigues me.

    I do run very high speeds on the DR, and in very hot, and soon to be loaded, weather.

    Since I'm not out in thorn country, if running thinner tubes is going to make my bike more reliable (i.e. not blowing out) and safer for the way I use the bike (commonly at the 80 or 90 MPH on the speedo, however wrong it is), then that's what I'll do.

    Anyone else with any input for tubes and speeds?
  18. procycle

    procycle Long timer

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    You can have single spokes custom made by Buchanan's.

    But I agree with RobTheRigger. Re-lacing with a full new set of spokes is probably best And really isn't much more work than trying to do just a couple of spokes. Before you commit to only replacing the 2 broken ones check ALL the spokes to see that all the nipples turn freely. If you have seized spoke nipples (very likely) those spokes will have to be cut out and replaced also. You can't properly true the wheel with any seized spoke nipples.
  19. procycle

    procycle Long timer

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    Yep, lighter, thinner tubes are better for on-road riding. Especially at higher speeds and with heavier loads.
  20. TrophyHunter

    TrophyHunter Long timer

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    Welcome IndyChizzle. Based on your bike history... and 2 sets of wheels, I see some fun in your future!