the DR650 thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by sleepywombat, May 1, 2006.

  1. Rusty Rocket

    Rusty Rocket Life behind "Bars"

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    I had a Suzuki SP600 1985. Same bike, basically. It was my very first 4 stroke bike after 15 years on 2 strokes. (I wanted to try dualsporting)
    Kick start only. Hard starting, especially hot. It was prone to "cough and die" when you whacked the throttle off idle. Now that I know more about jetting I think that could be overcome. Decent suspension. Mine lost almost all it's oil on a ride and I never figured out why. It had a knock after that, so I figured it was a bearing issue. I just sold it and stayed with 2 strokes for another 10 years before I tried another 4 stroke.
    There was zero aftermarket items for it. It had a 5 gallon tank. If you ever get it. try the tank on a modern (if 1996 is considered modern) DR650. I think I could track down a tank from one of those but don't want to waste my time if it doesn't fit. Good luck.
  2. Carl Childers

    Carl Childers Ghost in the Machine

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    big plus one!
  3. Carbster

    Carbster Adventurer

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    It's a giant piece of pork!!! A pig in a hokie greenie blanket

    All a scam at our expense! Demand that your legislators kill this BS!!!
  4. Rusty Rocket

    Rusty Rocket Life behind "Bars"

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    belong to the AMA, they are fighting E-15 now. (right after contacting you reps)
  5. ct-ktm

    ct-ktm Long timer

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    Like What.?
  6. Rusty Rocket

    Rusty Rocket Life behind "Bars"

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    automatically reminds you to replace rubber parts in the carb :wink:
  7. procycle

    procycle Long timer

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    Generates additional sales for folks who sell replacement carb parts. :evil
  8. FlowBee

    FlowBee Just me.

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    Corn prices took a crap in the past six months, approaching 4 year lows. The local TSC is selling corn stoves again so people can burn it to heat their homes. Yes, you buy feed corn by the pallet and burn it to heat. It's that cheap.

    Some of my neighbors were quick to harvest their soybeans, but the corn is still sitting in the field gathering snow. Combine that with the pork belly shortage due to all the piglets dying from the PED virus and the demand for corn / soy drops even more.

    A couple of them are talking about going back to wheat or buckwheat next year to feed the yuppies ...
  9. tlmaffucci

    tlmaffucci Been here awhile

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    What do you have to say about using 91,93 etc. octane fuel in the DR650? Does the manual call for 87?
  10. motolab

    motolab Long timer

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    One of them is more power! Ethanol is highly oxygenated by nature. Oxygenation is a way to to get more "air" into the engine without porting or wild cams (or on top of!). It will tolerate (or demand, depending on how you want to think about it) more compression and/or more ignition advance, as it is very detonation resistant (without involving lead or light aromatics, which are both really bad for humans to be around) while simultaneously having a cooling effect. Ethanol does require a different air/fuel ratio than gasoline, which is part of where the idea comes from that ethanol gives poor mileage. While that's technically true, an engine set up properly for ethanol makes more power than a gasoline engine of the same size, so that you could make the same power at a smaller displacement using ethanol, giving a significant portion of the mileage back. Of course using ethanol in an engine set up for gasoline will give poor results...

    Some may argue that if there is any mileage hit whatsoever, that's bad. In the case of an adventure bike that will be used as intended (lots of distance covered with few refueling opportunities) I agree with the argument. However, when produced by proper methods, ethanol can be so much cheaper than gasoline that the loss in mileage will be irrelevant in most contexts.

    I agree completely that the currently prevalent ethanol production methods are a really bad idea. We don't need GMOs and we don't need petroleum product based (fertilizer, pesticide and fuel) factory farming. Considering the high cost of producing corn, the low yield it produces (in terms of ethanol), and the transportation costs to get the end product to market, it's a losing proposition all around. There is also no morally sound argument for robbing the tax payer to support an "industry" that otherwise could not sustain itself.

    The way ethanol can be of major benefit is to produce it locally in a free market or in co-ops using already existing food waste & green (yard, etc.) waste supplemented with fast growing, high yield plants that produce multiple harvests per year (switchgrass is one example) and don't need irrigation or pesticides. The waste from ethanol production can be used as super high-quality organic fertilizer. The transportation costs would be reduced to close to zero (in money and in energy). Ethanol-related industrial production with all of its drawbacks (including the subsidies) could be eliminated, and individuals & communities would be many steps closer to energy self sufficiency and independence.

    Of course ethanol is cleaner out the tail pipe than gasoline.

    In this greater context, I consider issues with gas tanks, fuel hoses, o-rings and gaskets to be somewhat trivial. The materials and technologies to deal with these exist, and are not that difficult to implement.

    Please realize that big oil and the controllers in general would be quite happy to either keep things as they are, or to get rid of ethanol if it means going back to a purely mineral oil based fuel situation. Either way they retain their cash cow and their power. What they don't want is for their position to be challenged or compromised in any way, which properly implemented ethanol would do.

    Regards,

    Derek
  11. motolab

    motolab Long timer

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    It probably does, but if I personally were interested in that, I would not be cautioning people to refrain from doing things that cause the carb to wear out sooner, such as drilling slides, d-shaping or removing the needle spacer, or installing jet needles made out of hard materials (such as the DynoJet or Factory Pro), and I would not be encouraging them to improve their carburetor's under-diaphragm vent filtration.

    Regards,

    Derek
  12. amk

    amk Been here awhile

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    The goal is to reduce weight/space taken by them, but still be able to get me going w/o towing. I am not planning to do a major engine overhaul, just general things that might have occurred on their own. Like a flat, a broken wire, or a minor short circuit.
    Currently I carry:
    Front/rear tubes
    Two 30 cm long tire irons
    A bicycle pump
    A bicycle tire patch kit
    A metal epoxy
    Plastic ties
    A bicycle shifting wire
    Home made jump starters
    A couple of fuses
    Open end wrenches 24/22, 19/17, 12, 10, 8mm
    A spark plug wrench
    A double ended screwdriver
    Long nose pliers/cutters
    A small plastic bottle of chain lube

    It all takes a front fender pouch, the oem tool tube, and a welder rod tube on the back. All sums up to 4 kg brutto. While it still is only 2% of wet bike mass, I like to reduce it. What would you do, but taking a tube out, and replacing tire irons with titanium/carbon wrench/iron sets?
  13. FlowBee

    FlowBee Just me.

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    Well, you might want to attack the low-hanging fruit first. All those open end wrenches are probably steel, and likely heavy. Two alternatives: switch to an exotic material such as titanium or forged aluminum or find a combo tool that allows the heads to be swapped onto the standard lever arm. Given how fundamentally useful they are I'd be wary of going too cheap here.

    Same with the tire irons. I prefer to carry three, and they are steel, so I know how heavy they are. I'm saying up for some forged AL ones. OTOH my current tire irons have 24/19 mm heads on one end, so I don't have to carry those wrenches.

    Tubes - while I have never done so, I have heard some people have had success stuffing a 21" tube into an 17/18" rear tire in a pinch. Gets you back to civilization. This may allow you to lose one tube and carry a few patches / glue in your bicycle patch kit.

    Have you ever actually used those jumper cables? I once made a pair out of 18GA wire that I carried around for years. When I went to use them they couldn't deliever the needed juice. (14GA max).

    Everything else looks pretty fundamental. A cell phone and a credit card should form the basis of every situation as well. Not just for BMW riders - some times you might say to yourself "I'd give $300 to get out of here and back to work tomorrow...." Ka-ching!

    Got duct tape? Bailing wire? Got a way to mend a chain or drop in a new clip link? Got a way to replace a sprocket? Got a way to .....

    Good luck. :D
  14. amk

    amk Been here awhile

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    I have, with a car though. They would had melted down if used long enough, but the car started with the first turn.
    I will ditch the front tire, considering front flats 10 times less than rear.
    I have considered buying tire irons/wrenches combos, but they are short, mine are heavy, but guarantee to brake the bead and put any tire on/off.

    Thank you for reminding of duct tape/bailing wire, I will add them.

    The chain/sprockets should withstand the ride if checked upfront. No need to carry anything.
  15. Rusty Rocket

    Rusty Rocket Life behind "Bars"

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    I've carried a set of Aerostich mini jumper cables for 8 years. Used them several times, but in every case it was to help someone else.:1drink

    I carry them in a front fender bag along with a 21" tube. I buy the cheapest/lightest tube knowing it will only be used to get me home.

    I have a very heavy fanny pack. I need to lighten that a lot.:deal

    I have tried, but I find it hard to leave anything out that's already in there.

    Even though I almost never have to use any of it. Comes from riding in the 70's when you ended up fixing your bike in the woods more often than not.:wink:
  16. procycle

    procycle Long timer

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    +1
    I only carry front tubes. They are lighter/smaller than rear tubes and can be used in either tire.
  17. 8gv

    8gv Long timer

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    I miss riding in the 70's!

    Riding outfit...jeans and t-shirt

    Woods weapon...hopped up TS250

    Responsibilities...none

    Legalities...only if they can catch me

    :cry
  18. PPCLI-Jim

    PPCLI-Jim Been here awhile

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    Yup I hear you on that . bolt on plastic piece to make your helmet a full face
  19. FlowBee

    FlowBee Just me.

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    vs

    and


    That is the point. These other riders have confirmed this. A 21" tube can be stuffed into a 17/18" tire in a pinch and get you home. The opposite, not so much. So if you only carry 1 tube then make it a FRONT one.

    FB
  20. GSF1200S

    GSF1200S Been here awhile

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    Some good info here thanks :drink

    In regards to the tube, I personally used a 21 inch tube on the rear when I unfortunately pinched my first and only tube of the trip (in a hurry- grabbed too deep with an iron). I rode from Cantwell to Fairbanks without issue.

    One must consider some inherent disadvantages to doing this however. First off, the air at the gas station only went to 40psi and would not seat the bead on my K60. I limped at very low speeds from Cantwell to Healy with the bead not completely seated to a Carquest to see if they had a 17 inch tube. While they didn't, they did have powerful shop air. Despite insanely fast air, I had to inflate and deflate the tire multiple times and the bead didn't actually seat until I had approximately 100psi in the tube. I wouldn't normally go above 70 psi, but I was desperate and had no other chance but having the bike towed. Fortunately the moose uhd didn't blow and managed to seat the K60. Consider: how easy is this going to be with a hand pump or even an electric one? I had the bead lubed first with wd40 and eventually with bead lube from carquest and it STILL wouldn't seat! At least carry a proper tube IF the tire you're using is notorious for being difficult to set the bead.

    The next crappy part is now I had NO spare tube. Rather than chance a flat on the Denali highway, I limped into Fairbanks to get spare tubes. I would personally recommend HD tubes in the tires while carrying normal tubes as spares. This is just IMO.