The G650 GS Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by LarryGee, Jan 29, 2012.

  1. Adventure MotoX

    Adventure MotoX Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2012
    Oddometer:
    271
    Location:
    Dubai, United Arab Emirates / Used to be Ottawa
    Awesome! Im lovin' mine too!
    I just picked up the BMW hand-guards that I ordered and bolted them on today... I like em over the generic TT ones.
    Cheers
  2. pyoungbl

    pyoungbl Colonel Blood

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2007
    Oddometer:
    559
    Location:
    Portsmouth, Virginia
    I just listed my 2010 G650GS in the AdvRider classified section. The bike it totally farkled out and ready for the TAT. Lots of spares too!
  3. henrymartin

    henrymartin Mr. Tourguide

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2010
    Oddometer:
    3,725
    Location:
    South of the Great North Woods
    It's been a long maintenance week for the GS and me.

    What started as a simple tire change - going for the TKC 80 here - turned out to be sightly more complicated.
    [​IMG]
    When the wheels came off, I looked at the sprockets. No doubt, they needed changing. My chain started stretching at a higher rate in the last 500 or so miles, so I knew I would have to change them soon, but I was hoping to finish the season on the old set. At 11k, the stock sprockets looked like this (new sprockets right next to them):
    [​IMG]
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    The front, especially, was pretty bad.

    Every time I take my wheels off, I like to check the bearings as well. The front was fine, but the rear would not even turn when trying to spin them by hand (on the bike, however, I never noticed this). So out came the bearings and then it was time to shop for new ones (which I found at a local industrial supply shop at a low cost - same part numbers as the stock ones, SKF brand).
    To remove the bearings, first I had to pry the seal out (with a dull blade screwdriver), remove a circlip, then knock on the bearings a couple of times to free the inner spacer. Once I got the spacer moving enough to tilt it slightly, I could get a long screwdriver in to hit against the bearings' inner races. A little heat from a hairdryer on the hub helped things along the way. I've seen some people use propane torches to heat the hub, but the gentle heat of the hairdryer did a fine job without melting any paint.
    The sprocket carrier bearings are a little different. The inner bearing has to come out first, followed by a spacer, a circlip, and finally the outer bearing. Again, a little heat and they came out without any problems. You just have to move the spacer out of the way to be able to hit the inner race.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Before installing the new bearings, I cleaned everything really well (on the inside).

    On the outside of the sprocket carrier there is a spacer that rides halfway in a seal. The trail-made lapping compound of mud and sand did a fine job in making two smooth groves in it. This would either allow more dirt behind the seals, or damage the seals over time, so I had a stainless steel spacer made at a local machine shop. There were also some rock nicks on the spacer.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    A little cleanup around the front sprocket shaft, the rear carrier, and swingarm, and it was time for my new chain. I decided to go with RK XSO chain. I'll see how long it lasts under the harsh, Dualsport use. If I can't get any decent mileage from this one either, I'll be switching to cheap, non-O-ring chains and swapping them more frequently.
    [​IMG]
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    I cut the change to stock length, 112 links, then used a clip master link instead of the rivet type. Some people like the clip links, some don't. I have never had one fail, so I used one on this chain as well. I think the key is to install the clip properly. First I put the O-rings where they belong, then squeezed the plates together with a pair of 6mm nuts over the pins. This pushed the O-rings in place and, after removing the vise, install the clip without any issues. I then cleaned the outside of the clip and baseplate with brake cleaner, and applied a little RTV to secure the clip in place should it fail for some reason.
    [​IMG]
    While the wheel was off, I noticed my rear brake pads were on the thin side, so I replaced those as well.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
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    And then I found that my from sprocket cover has a crack at the bottom and two of the brass inserts (through which the bolts pass through) pulled out of the plastic. Fix it or Farkle? Farkle won, but that is a story for a separate post.

    The TKCs do look nice on the bike though. :)
    [​IMG]
  4. henrymartin

    henrymartin Mr. Tourguide

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2010
    Oddometer:
    3,725
    Location:
    South of the Great North Woods
    During maintenance, I realized that my stock sprocket cover was busted. First I thought about fixing it, but then the desire to farkle won.

    How do you spell trouble?
    [​IMG]
    The front sprocket cover is a simple, two piece design.
    [​IMG]

    At first, it did not want to fit properly as the front kept interfering with an engine case bolt, but with a little bending it worked out. I opted for the original design vs the Rally style, as the original maintains some protection between the chain and the engine, whereas the Rally appears wide open on all sides. I know I've picked some stuff on my chain in the past I would not want hitting the engine case.
    [​IMG]
    Since I was doing the sprocket cover, I also got the lighter, cleaner-looking chain guard.
    Again, a simple, two piece construction with an extra ABS guard that goes on the opposite side.
    [​IMG]
    The long vertical piece bolts to the chainguard, and then attaches to the bottom of the swingarm via a plastic hex spacer. Really? Not only those little bolts (3mm dia, IIRC) that attach the spacer are the weak link, but the lack of any through bolt leaves me wondering about the longevity of this piece. On the plus side, the hex spacer was far too long to fit:
    [​IMG]
    So I modified it with a nylon spacer, and a 6mm stainless through bolt.
    [​IMG]
    I also read some stories about the TT chainguard breaking from vibration, so I used some O-rings between the chainguard and the mounting points on the swingarm. Loctite is a must :)
    [​IMG]
    Overall, not a bad looking piece.
    [​IMG]

    I also reused the stock BMW bolts since they are Torx and I already carry Torx bits on my bike (for all the other BMW stuff). The stainless Allen bolts just strip too easily.

    Here is the ABS guard, again, attached with stock BMW bolts and backed by O-rings.
    [​IMG]

    So, my first impression of Touratech? Decent product at a not-so-decent price. The material could be much thicker and the instructions could be in English (German only). Shipping was fast and reasonable, packaging was exceptional, and their stuff is just...cool. The quality, however, could be better. Finish is rather nice, and there are no sharp burrs, but the parts lack "meat" for lack of a better word.

    My homemade light bar and rear master cylinder cover are three times as thick. :deal
  5. Rordog

    Rordog Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2007
    Oddometer:
    154
    Location:
    Waterloo, Il.
    I put the Ezy mounts on my 12 Sertao. You have to trim a little plastic off of a rib that is on the fender.
  6. Guttooth71

    Guttooth71 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2011
    Oddometer:
    45
    Location:
    Poconos PA
    Hello to all, I just purchased a new to me a 09 650gs. Plan on using it 90% roads, 10% off road. 4400 mi on the bike, in good condition. I plan on having the 6000 mile service done ASAP for peace of mind. Since I am not very tall and can barely stand on my toes I have to add 1" lowering links. Also plan on hand, engine, faring guards and a tall windscreen. Any tips, tricks, or tools anyone Recomend? Can I expect 100k out of a well maintained bike? Thanks
  7. RogerWilco

    RogerWilco Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2011
    Oddometer:
    332
    We put the BMW factory "tall" windscreen on our G650GS and could barely notice a difference. We do not consider it to have been money well spent.
  8. Davidc83

    Davidc83 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2009
    Oddometer:
    522
    Location:
    Southern Indiana
    I have a 2009 g650gs I bought new in 2009. I dont think anyone on here has had one long enough to put 100,000 miles on one yet, but I am about to the 30,000 (29,890) mile mark (I have 2 other bikes I ride). The BMW tall windscreen is a waste of money. I bought one and noticed no difference; it is only a couple of inches taller than the stock. I bought a CeeBaileys 20" windscreen and really like it.
  9. guavadude

    guavadude de-composer

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2009
    Oddometer:
    917
    Location:
    Dallas, TX
    I have an '09 with 21k miles I've put on it. Here's my list of add ons:

    SW Motech crash bars. Buy these first!
    You will drop the bike and plastic is expensive. These have been great and I can put my feet up on them when on the highway, no hwy pegs needed.

    Large Z Technik windshield. Tried the medium and it didn't make any difference but the large completely removes the buffeting. I still get some wind noise but wear ear plugs so it's not bad. I may still try the Madstad since its more adjustable.

    SW Motech foot pegs. These are awesome. Great grip without being too spiky when the rubber is removed. Has a lower position that still works fine with existing pedals.

    The biggest difference has been changing the rear sprocket to 49. I just changed my original chain and sprockets at 19k.
    I use the DuPont Teflon chain lube you can get at Lowes. It's great and $5. I got the new sprockets and chain from the f650.com vendor area for a great price. I should have done this a long time ago.

    I also reworked the seat, butt that's another thread I need to post with pics.
  10. henrymartin

    henrymartin Mr. Tourguide

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2010
    Oddometer:
    3,725
    Location:
    South of the Great North Woods
    I have about 11k on my 2009, but I only bought it two years ago and have other bikes and obligations.

    Just had to change the sprockets and chain - stock chain started stretching at an accelerated rate and front sprocket was pretty worn. went With JT steel sprockets and RK XSO chain.

    Add ons:

    BMW engine guards - I like the enclosed cage and it gets hit fairly often.
    BMW hand guards - really only weather protection, but it works for me.
    Givi 3 case setup on Givi racks
    Z technik tall windscreen. Made the bike comfortable to ride at highway speeds
    TT fork protectors
    TT chain guard
    TT front sprocket guard
    BMW tankbag
    hardwired GPS on a RAM mount
    Lightbar with two 35W lights, running all the time, wired to ignition controlled circuit.
    Extra brake light pods - 2 on racks, 2 under license plate
    20mm handlebar risers (Barkbusters)
    GPR exhaust
    Modified seat and new cover
    Open air box
    rear brake master cover, reservoir cover

    Most of it is here: http://www.hmwrites.blogspot.com/search/label/bmw g650gs
  11. climb-on

    climb-on climb-on

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2011
    Oddometer:
    2
    Location:
    on the road, Utah,Idaho
    OK, heres one for you . I took my G650 into the BMW shop to get a fork leak fixed (under warranty) the (self proclaimed) mechanic came into the front of the shop and stated "ive fixed hundreds of these leaks but had to use a sledge hammer to get the bushings out of the fork tube" consequently he damaged the tube and they have to order it. I told him that i had been a jet engine machanic for 8 years and that there was probably a better way. OOPs :rofl that did'nt go over very well !! whats your two cents?
  12. Guttooth71

    Guttooth71 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2011
    Oddometer:
    45
    Location:
    Poconos PA
    I noticed when it's in neutral and is idling while on side stand exhaust is coming out of only the right exhaust pipe. The left one is not putting anything out. Is this normal? The bike runs fine, no issues yet, does the left sided exhaust engage once the bike is moving? Also anyone know how to set the clock? Thanks
  13. ctoldie

    ctoldie Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2011
    Oddometer:
    295
    Location:
    Northern CT. & Florida
    The left side is catalytic converter only. Right side is normal exhaust.
    Your owners manual will tell you how to set clock,
  14. Guttooth71

    Guttooth71 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2011
    Oddometer:
    45
    Location:
    Poconos PA
    Thank you for taking the time to reply, only thing is the bike did not come with an owners manual. I will try looking online.
  15. henrymartin

    henrymartin Mr. Tourguide

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2010
    Oddometer:
    3,725
    Location:
    South of the Great North Woods
    The left side on newer 650GS singles is fully closed, whereas on the older 650s I saw a small hole in the left side exhaust (like 1/8-1/4" hole).

    Anyway, don't try to drill the exhaust out as some forums suggest. I did, and my left side was running real hot afterwards, and I only drilled a 1/2" hole through the end cap. I ended up buying an aftermarket exhaust and it runs so cool I can touch it right after a long ride.
  16. twinrider

    twinrider pass the catnip

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2002
    Oddometer:
    9,613
    Location:
    日本
    Just turn the ignition key to on, then set the hour and minutes using the two small inset buttons on the dash.
  17. Adventure MotoX

    Adventure MotoX Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2012
    Oddometer:
    271
    Location:
    Dubai, United Arab Emirates / Used to be Ottawa
    Hey,
    how did the 49 affect the bike?

    Thanks
  18. guavadude

    guavadude de-composer

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2009
    Oddometer:
    917
    Location:
    Dallas, TX
    Go to gearingcommander.com and you can see the numbers. Basically it raises the rpm a little. I was going to put a 15 CS sprocket on years ago but never did. I've always felt one major problem with the bike is not having a 6th gear so increasing the rpms would help my slow offroading riding but would make my highway rides even more vibey.

    The 49 rear is a notch in between. The Professor Steve from f650.com said he thinks this is the way the bike should have come from the factory and I totally agree! No more lugging in low gears. I put these on just before a trip to CO and on the Alpine Loop offroading, this saved my ass. You can crawl up stuff in 1st gear much better and can descend more slowly as well.
    Overall the bike feels more zippy, like it has a little turbo boost now. And while I still think it could use a 6th gear, it kinda makes the higher gears feel smoother, less vibey since the RPMS are up.
    This isn't a drastic change but it's not subtle either.
    I really like it...feels like a new bike to me.
  19. twinrider

    twinrider pass the catnip

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2002
    Oddometer:
    9,613
    Location:
    日本
    I went with a 15T front sprocket. The motor feels busier at highway speeds but I like the performance at lower speeds. Less downshifting as well.
  20. Adventure MotoX

    Adventure MotoX Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2012
    Oddometer:
    271
    Location:
    Dubai, United Arab Emirates / Used to be Ottawa
    I wish it had a 15 front and a 6th gear :)

    Thanks guys.