The I LOVE THIS GUN Thread

Discussion in 'Shiny Things' started by HiTechRedneck, Nov 20, 2008.

  1. RonS

    RonS Out there...

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    Yeah, the Ft. Lewis one was available to the public at one time. Not sure what happened there. I'd love to try a range that had paper all the way out to 1000 yards like an F Class competition range. We can't really tell what kind of groups were getting with the metal targets since there are a number of people shooting and you loose track of the paint that was taken off. About all you can tell is that your windage and elevation are in the ball park.

    6 inches at 600 yards is competitive level. I doubt very much that we are close to that. All we know is that we can hit the metal buffalo at 500 yards so consistently that it becomes too easy. We can hit the gong at 700 yards consistently enough. Beyond that distance, wind, load consistency and shooting technique start separating the men from the boys and even though we can hit the gong at 1000 yards we can't do it consistently enough especially when there is variable wind. And when we do I'm sure that our groups are not something that would impress anyone. We’re still using factory ammo at this point so this is more long distance plinking than any kind of serious long distance shooting. It is fun though.
  2. RonS

    RonS Out there...

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    I've got a CS 550 FS in 9.3x62 that has a set trigger. I love it but everyone who has shot it hates it. I tell them that once it's set all they have to do is breath on it. It still usually takes people by surprise. If you aren't completely ready and have that butt stock firmly to your shoulder it'll leave a bruise that will take a couple of days to go away.
  3. YakSpout

    YakSpout Obstacle Allusion

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    :lol3

    My uncle has a couple of bench-rest rifles with 2oz triggers. Everyone's first experience with one of those seems to go the same way.

    "Before you close the bolt, remember that it's a light trigger. Keep your finger out of the guard until your absolutely ready."

    Cha-click, the bolt closes and fat-finger Freddy moves his shooting hand into position.

    BOOM!

    "OW!"

    "I told ya."
  4. ttpete

    ttpete Rectum Non Bustibus

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    I have a fairly lightweight .375 H&H, and the only time it's been benched was to get the scope zeroed. It's OK recoil-wise if you stand up to shoot. I don't care to bench large bore guns, because it's an easy way to get a flinch going.
  5. RonS

    RonS Out there...

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    Yeah, my brother has a .375 H&H as well. You can almost tell that people have wet themselves a bit when they touch that monster off. :lol3
  6. HardCase

    HardCase winter is coming

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    I shot a '75 vintage Win Model 70 in 375H&H for about a decade, shot it a lot actually, and with full loads. My favorite was a 300 grain Sierra boat-tail spitzer loaded pretty close to max. The gun wasn't a featherweight, but still kicked like hell from a bench. I used to zero it with a 25# bag of lead shot positioned between the gun and my shoulder. I eventually got tired of the beating and sold it to a friend who still has it but doesn't shoot it much. My hard kicker now is a Ruger No. 1, which is pretty lightweight, in 9.3x74R. That one kicks about as bad as the old 375 did because it's so light. I did get one of the Sorbothane shoulder pads, can't think of the brand-name, but that helps some. I think the bag of lead-shot is easier on the shoulder by a large margin, but I think it might be harder on the gun, especially scope mounting screws. I've heard of them being sheared off when the gun is not allowed to move sufficiently.
  7. doc_ricketts

    doc_ricketts Thumper jockey

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    But they cost money and I am a real cheap bastid. My crude mod works good if I just remember to put the safety on before closing the bolt.
  8. itsatdm

    itsatdm Long timer

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    Set triggers have been around for a while. My circa 1880 Ballard has one. 1 up from the bottom.
    [​IMG]

    Luckily a 218B does not kick much.
  9. ttpete

    ttpete Rectum Non Bustibus

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    I'll bet that the .218 Bee is the Martini Cadet. I also have one. I use a 10X Unertl 1" gallery scope on it. Fun little gun.
  10. itsatdm

    itsatdm Long timer

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    Close, it a Martini model 12/15 Target rifle in its original .22cal. Its the heaviest gun I own.
  11. ttpete

    ttpete Rectum Non Bustibus

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    Interesting. I have a set of orthoptic sights for one of those. One lens clamps on the muzzle, the other one screws into a tang sight, and it works like a scope.

    My .22 target rifle is a Winchester 52-C bull gun. We do a rimfire bench match once a year at the club, and it's lots of fun.
  12. RonS

    RonS Out there...

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    Very nice collection of vintage rifles. I've got a "modern" 1885 in 45-70 made by Uberti with a soule long range sight and another made by Browning (Japan) in 25-06 that is scoped. Love that 45-70. I managed to hit the Buffalo at 500 yards shooting freehand (with a sling to stabilize) at the range a couple of weeks ago. I didn't know it at the time but everyone on the range was watching. They clapped when I hit it. I put it down after that. Didn't want to know if it was luck or skill but there is a high probability that it was the former. :lol3
  13. itsatdm

    itsatdm Long timer

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    My highwall is a 4 digit, flat spring gun made around 1887. Original 32-20.

    The rolling block is a 44-77 made in 1878. .446 cal, with a larger case than the 45.70.

    The Ruger #3 45-70 only weighs about 6.5 lb and loaded to max will make you cry after about 10 rounds.
  14. RonS

    RonS Out there...

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    Very cool. Not the crying part you understand. I know what that's about. My brother likes to load hot 45-70's and watch people cry when shooting them. He's a sick bastard.
  15. FatChance

    FatChance Road Captain

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    Love those! Here are some more:

    [​IMG]
  16. itsatdm

    itsatdm Long timer

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    Yours are prettier than mine. Tell me about the Ballard.
  17. FatChance

    FatChance Road Captain

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    The Ballard started life as a standard #9 Union Hill, made in 1883. It was setup as a black powder cartridge rifle (BPCR) competition gun by Ron Long before I purchased it. It has a .45-70 Ron Long barrel with Montana Vintage globe front (with spirit level) and long-range Soule rear sight with a Hadley eye cup. Ron also replaced the original single trigger with an original Ballard #8 double set trigger. I got it in the early '90s. I had the action charcoal case color hardened by the Ballard factory in Cody, Wyoming. Interestingly, Ron Long was working there at that time and enjoyed seeing the rifle again. I had also got a gorgeous block of wood with it and had that stock made (saved the original stock, of course). I cast my own 505gr bullets and loaded with Goex black powder. It shot well under a MOA and was a wonderful competition shooter. Unfortunately, I sold it in a moment of weakness several years ago to someone who wanted it more than I did after I drifted away from shooting competitions. I'm still black and blue from kicking myself for that decision.
  18. RonS

    RonS Out there...

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    Those are simply beautiful. I want that Ballard.
  19. VegasKLRider

    VegasKLRider Long timer

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    I had a target rifle with a 6 oz trigger and I could never get the results that I can with a 2.5# trigger. The muscle twitches caused by changing from extensor muscles to flexors are more pronounced than adding slightly more stress to flexors in my case.
  20. YakSpout

    YakSpout Obstacle Allusion

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    I used to aim the rifle while it was bags, shoulder it, close the bolt and put my finger on the trigger guard. Then I'd slowly move my finger back until I could feel trigger contact. Once there, I would just sort of roll my finger on the guard until I got the bang. :dunno

    I'm sure bench-rest shooters could critique my home-brewed method, but I was just popping squirrels at 300yd, not gunning for 0.013" groups.

    My current rimfire match rifles are in the 3# range and I like that a bit better since we shoot from so many positions.