The Motorcycle Chronicles of Jackie & Valentino... The Southern Episode

Discussion in 'Epic Rides' started by V@lentino, Sep 20, 2013.

  1. V@lentino

    V@lentino Inspektor

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
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    A lot has been said and read about crossing Central American borders. About the interminable wait, the complicated procedures, the difficult to find, sometimes absent officials, the non-descript official buildings, etc, etc…

    Well, yesterday was border day for us and it went something like this:

    At Salvador exit 0755 done @ 0810
    At Honduras entrance 0813 done @ 0911
    At Honduras exit 1155 done @ 1218
    At Nicaragua entrance 1220 done @ 1314

    Granted speaking Spanish helps. But then again, anyone with a minimum of knowledge, say... Lonelyplanet phrase-book level, some patience, a smile and common sense should be able to breeze through all these border crossings without any difficulties at all.


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    I want to debunk the myth a bit. Look for no specifics here. In all cases, when you first arrive look for someone usually at a narrow booth that is dressed in some type of official uniform, they may or may not ask you to show them your passport, but will inevitably direct you to a place to park your ride. Pick a shaded spot.

    Next identify the two places that you need to interact with; Aduana (bike) and Imigracion (you).

    Ignore the touts for help: no gracias, no necesito ayuda, and smile. You might have to repeat this a few times.


    Entry:
    Aduana
    You need vehicle registration or title; Canadians do not have titles for their vehicles, only registrations, and your driver’s licence. Inadvertently an official will fill in a form to transfer your information into an import vehicle form, this may be done by hand, typed or entered in a computer.

    You may or may not need copies of that document, and you may or may not have to get it stamped by another official who may or may not verify your VIN. Usually that person is standing outside not very far from aduana

    Aduana will likely require 1 to 3 copies of your registration/title, passport and DL, you may or may not have to pay a fee.


    Jackie fixing the fixer

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    Fumigacion
    The bottom half of your bike gets fumigated, you pay a small fee.


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    Imigracion
    You show your passport you may or may not get a stamp you may or may not pay a fee.


    Copias
    You are likely to have to visit the little shack named “Copias” to make copies of your stamped or completed paperwork.

    You may or may not have to show that you have completed all these steps correctly to one final guard/official at a control post prior to hitting the road again.

    This process takes anywhere from 45 minutes to 1hour 30 minutes, of course -YMMV-


    The copy shop

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    Exit is quicker
    As you arrive at the crossing an official may or may not look at your paperwork and will then direct you to Aduana and Imigracion.

    Aduana
    An official will look at your vehicle entry form, and will likely stamp it; you may or may not need the vehicle entry form from the previous country to enter into the next.

    Imigracion will look at your passport, and entry form if applicable, they may or may not stamp them.

    This process takes anywhere from 5 to 20 minutes.


    I got the disease, I can't stop taking pictures of motos

    Small

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    Beeg

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    Moneychangers

    We found it most practical to have a minimum of the local currency left when leaving the country. The moneychangers are there to make a living, so just think of them as the same as the foreign exchange counter at any airport, except; it will be hot, it will be humid, and they are likely to be wearing sandals. Instead of being behind a glass counter, they carry huge piles of cash and a satchel.


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    Know the official rate for the currency you are changing from/to, ask them how much they will give you for a determined amount, if you can’t say “Cuando” (remember your Lonelyplanet phrase-book level Spanish) just use their calculator. Each time I exchanged the money I used the split the difference strategy, and I was happy with the “fee/commission” I was being charged.


    Jackie the quintessential border fixer

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    So for instance if 400 blue widgets are really worth 1100 red widgets and they are offering me 900 reds for my blues, I just said no, give me 1000, they pout, look at me with pleading eyes, I shake my head and repeat the same number, and the transaction is completed within a few seconds on a handshake to both our satisfaction.

    We have found that the time of day (lunch time) did not influence the rapidity of the service we received from border officials. Everybody in an official position, without exception has been friendly and helpful.


    Valentino was screwing around with the camera, nothing to do but wait...

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    What do you mean nothing to do but wait WTF!!! :huh

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    Now for the useful tip section:

    Before you leave home, or on the road when you have a chance, have plenty of copies made of your drivers licence front and back, your vehicle registration/title, and your passport (photo page).

    Find out what the official fees for entry/exit are so you have an idea of the minimal currency you will need for entry. You could also opt to change a small amount of US dollars with the moneychangers into the local currency if you do not have sufficient money left from the previous country.

    Lunch in Honduras

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    Making could use of the J&V stickers

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    And for a minimum of pontificating:

    Just as Americans, Canadians are used to minimal entry procedures between both countries. It always makes me laugh when I hear people commenting or complaining about (now) needing a passport to cross the border between Canada and the US. Europeans have it even easier within the Schengen area. Pair that reality with the heat, the humidity, and the foreign language, and I can understand that the formalities may seem overwhelming for some.

    In fact it is very reflective of our low context culture, as Westerners we are largely desensitized to context, and conduct our daily lives in sheep-like fashion, we are lost without signs and indications, we need at least four sometimes eight signals at one intersection, a green left/right arrow, and several lines and other delineations painted on the ground to tell us where to turn, all in the name of safety and order. Victoria, the city where I live is a prime example of that, there is an incredible amount of signage and generally speaking drivers are really bad.

    In the rest of the world, with exceptions of course, the more you go East and South the more people rely on context to interact with their surroundings, hence they are used to make decision for themselves, and do not necessarily associate the systematic lack of information, and official conventions to be either a sign of chaos or a treat. As such they are able to navigate a busy roundabout several lanes wide or cross a busy intersection with a single signal indicating the right of way, they are used to dealing with animals on the road without signage indicating a deer crossing for the next 10km. There isn't a stop sign at every street corner...

    The same concept apply to these border crossings, you have to rely on yourself to find your way in and out of a relatively easy maze. This warren will have little indications of where the exit is, and you will likely get lost and hit a dead end here and there. You will have to backtrack, although you might get scolded if you make a mistake, you will not get hurt nor loose your shirt.

    Both Hall and Hofstede have studied this, and other related phenomena and behaviours that identify broad differences in cultural values and communication styles. Although general, these theories explain a lot about our cultural differences and why certain things happen the way they do i.e.: this thing with traffic, why some airliners crash, why cultures are easily offended, even irritated by the behaviours of others, regardless if they are visiting or visited. It is, to a certain extent related to emotional intelligence, capacity for apathy, awareness of self and others, notions of independence and interdependence.

    What is interesting about all these cultural/communication behaviours, is that no matter how cliché many of them are, more often than none they are very reflective of a given group, society, country, culture...

    This is not the same thing as a stereotype, where one says: "all Americans are..." As opposed to; when placed in this situation, and facing this decision, Italians are more likely to behave this way, compare to Chinese who are more likely to behave that way (when faced with the same decision/situation). This include things like uncertainty avoidance, low/high tolerance to ambiguity, face saving behaviour, individualism vs collectivism, femininity vs masculinity...

    For anyone interested in sociology, communications, human behaviour... these concepts provide a lot of reasons/justifications as to why we are the way we are, and why for so many of us it is difficult to change a behaviour or habit.

    Cultural dimension theory; there is even an app for it called "Cultural GPS"

    The key factor in my mind is self-awareness and the will to relinquish control.:thumb

    The ride through Honduras was really nice and shortly after we crossed into Nicaragua we saw lots of animals. Horses, pigs, cows, chicken, goats, you name it we saw them, a lot of them leisurely walking around.




    Don't think this guy would pass "Air Care"

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    It was also a lot of fun zigzaging around the potholes


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    The volcanoes and landscape were amazing, barely a cloud in sky.


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    Just WOW

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    Tonight we rest in Leon

    [​IMG]

  2. V@lentino

    V@lentino Inspektor

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2008
    Oddometer:
    826
    Location:
    Vankouver
    This is the list where we have stayed so far. Once outside of the US we rarely paid more than $35.00-$40.00 per night, some as high as $65.00, others as low as $20.00. Remember these costs are for two people.

    We would go back to all these places except maybe the hotel in Durango, it was kind of crappy and the service was pretty lousy.

    The condo we stayed in Zipolite, Mx on the beach was $100.00 a night but we split this in two, as we still had a riding partner at this point and shared two bedroom.

    The list includes our KM per each travel day so far. You can find all the places using Google. Except walk ins, all were booked through:

    Hostel bookers

    VRBO

    Booking.com

    Hostel World

    And Trip Advisors to get an idea of the place from the review

    I kept a detail list of gas cost, I will post that next

    09/21
    Travel lodge Centralia WA, US 429km

    09/22
    Villa West Florence OR, US
    398km

    09/23
    Elk Prairie camp ground, Redwood nat prk CA, US
    288km

    09/24
    Travellers Inn, San Carlos CA, US
    469km

    09/25
    Friend, Santa Monica CA
    584km

    09/26
    Friend, Glendora CA
    70km

    10/01
    Friend, Maricopa, AZ
    628km

    10/02
    Hotel Piñon, Neuvo Casas Grandes, Chihuahua, MX
    574km

    10/03
    Plaza Mexicana, Creel, CH, MX
    408km

    10/04
    Hotel Acosta, Hidalgo Del Parral, CH, MX
    400km

    10/05
    Hotel Rincon Real Suites, Durango, DGO, MX
    416km

    10/07
    Hostal Villa Colonial, Zacatecas, ZCT, MX
    294km

    10/09
    Hotel Guadalajara
    San Miguel Potosi, MX
    182km

    10/10
    Guanajuato,MX
    Casa Mexicana,
    208km

    10/12
    San Miguel de Allende, MX
    Hotel San Ramon (5 ms outside of town)
    88km

    10/15
    Morelia, MX
    Casa Castillo
    208km

    10/17
    Mexico City, MX
    Hotel Cathedral
    332km

    10/19
    Puebla, MX
    Hostal Santo Domingo
    126km

    10/22
    Oaxaca, MX
    El Quijote
    175km

    10/28
    Zipolite, MX
    Monarcha
    190km

    10/29
    Tuxtla Guiterrez,MX
    Hotel del Carmen
    502km

    11/01
    Palenque, MX
    Yaxkin
    270 kn

    11/03
    Flores, GT
    Chahunta
    412km

    11/03
    Santa Cruz Verapaz, GT
    Park Hotel
    302km

    11/07
    Antigua, GT
    Casa rustica
    143km

    11/08
    Playa Tunco, Sal
    Layback hostal
    403km

    11/10
    San Salvadore, Sal
    Hostal Dona Marta
    35km

    11/12
    San Miguel, Sal
    Villas San Miguel
    136km
  3. arjones

    arjones Roads and Waves

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2012
    Oddometer:
    211
    Location:
    Bahia, Brazil
    About post #101: I just read the most insightful and beautiful piece of RR ever here in advrider. Thank you. It's nice to realize some of us can really enjoy the diversity!!!

    Keep going, brother and sister. Right now I'm just wanting to be your host here in northeast Brasil...

    :clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap
  4. V@lentino

    V@lentino Inspektor

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2008
    Oddometer:
    826
    Location:
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    arjones,

    In fact a little goes a long way. I really believe that self awareness and listening are key to communication, and the gateway to cultural understanding.

    So much of the time we are clueless about our actions, say things that don't mean much, and don't really listen to what the "other" might have to say.


    We are planning on doing a "loop" to Brazil from Buenos Aires, time permitting, when we make our way north from Tierra Del Fuego to Buenos Aires.

    If not we might just have to fly down and visit some other time; I subscribe to the marry-me fly-free program :evil

    Thanks for tagging along

    Really think about what you want to say, so you may say what you really think​
  5. V@lentino

    V@lentino Inspektor

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
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    [​IMG]


    Here are our gas stats:ricky

    Port Angeles, WA , US
    21/09
    20.00 - 92 oct @ 4.079 per Gal
    49219

    Centralia, WA, US
    22/09
    19.96 - 92 oct @ 3.959 per Gal
    49768

    Florence, OR, US
    23/09
    27.15 - 92 oct @ 3.719 per Gal

    Eureka, CA, US
    24/09
    32.40 - 91 oct @ 4.399 per Gal

    Point Reyes CA, US
    24/09
    32.30 - 91 oct @ 4.569 per gal
    50563

    San Miguel CA, US
    25/09
    29.46 - 91 oct @ 4.559 per gal
    50807

    Glendora CA, US
    28/09
    29.17 - 91 oct @ 4.139 per gal
    51082

    Tom Wells AZ, US
    01/10
    26.83 - 91 oct @ 3.899 per gal
    51342

    Maricopa AZ, US
    01/10
    16.60 - 91 oct @ 3.519 per gal
    51512m

    Douglas AZ, US
    02/10
    20.19 - 91 oct @ 3.779 per gal
    51720

    Nuevos Casas Grandes, MX
    03/10
    161.30 - 92 oct @ 12.36p per lt
    51861

    Creel CH MX, MX
    03/10
    230.19 - 92 oct @ 12.36p per lt
    52116

    Hidalgo Del Parral, MX
    06/10
    302.00 - 91 oct @ 12.47p per lt
    52371

    Durango, MX
    07/10
    265.07 - 92 oct @ 12.47 per lt
    52624

    Santania, MX
    09/10
    295.10 - 92 oct @ 12.47 per lt
    52888

    San Miguel De Allende, MX
    13/10
    288..28 - 92 oct @ 12.48 per lt
    53119

    Huajumbaro, MX
    16/10
    269.49 - 92 oct @ 12.47 per lt
    53338

    Tihuacan, MX
    20/10
    318.61 - 92 oct @ 12.47 per lt
    53639

    San Augustine de la Mecca, MX
    23/10
    371.95 - 92 oct @ 12.47 per lt
    53932

    Salina Cruz, MX
    29/10
    270.34 - 92 oct @ 12.47 per lt
    54157

    Tuxtla Guiterrez, MX
    30/10
    235.58 - 92 oct 12.47 per lt
    54452

    Palenque, MX
    30/10
    200.92 - 92 oct 12.47 per lt
    54519

    Tenosique last, MX Gaz
    01/11
    72.44 -92 oct 12.47 per lt
    54575

    Flores GT
    03/11
    175 - 88 oct 36.43 qtz per gal

    Coban, GT
    03/11
    150- 88 oct 36.43 per gal

    Ciudad Vieja, GT
    08/11
    130 - 95 oct 32.89 per gal
    55118

    Metalillo, Sal
    08/11
    15.78 - oct 97 @ 4.09 usd per gal
    55298

    San Miguel, Sal
    12/11
    14.50 - oct 97 @ 4.08 per gal
    55461

    Granada, Nic
    15/11
    756.70 - oct 95 @ 30.25 Dro per lt
    55742

    After 6523 miles or 10437 km..................... "we are still married says Jackie :crash;

    What did you expect, you want the total cost, you figure it out…. The first number before “- oct” is the cost of that fill in local currency :mully.

    Spending the night in Granada, Nicaragua.

    We hooked up with Moto Mikey (you can follow his adventures at moto-mikey.com) right in the middle of the plaza, had not seem him since Creel, MX. Tomorrow we hang out and share tales from the road


    [​IMG]
  6. arjones

    arjones Roads and Waves

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
    211
    Location:
    Bahia, Brazil
    Wisdom on your trip's perspective, as on your choice of marriage...:lol3

    Looking forward for more!

    Arjones.

    P.S.: of course my invitation extends beyond the vehicle of your arrival over here. At some point I'm gonna send you a PM with some coordinates so you can do a little search about my place and decide when and how you gonna show up... Cheers!
  7. Fat Man Bass

    Fat Man Bass n00b

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2006
    Oddometer:
    9
    Location:
    The Netherlands
    Are you now with the 2 of you or still with 3?

    Beautiful report, but don't make it too "shrinky"...:D

    What I liked was the reverse road construction.

    Reminds me of a story here.
    I was building a new office and it was raining and storming.
    My constructor told me there was a lot of wind.
    I replied that I saw a lot of big fans along the road and I just could not understand why they put those things on when it storms and we do not need them, while they leave them off when it is hot and we are in deep need for ventilation.
    He did not understand me...

    Enjoy the ride.

    Are you back on time for my ski vacation?
  8. V@lentino

    V@lentino Inspektor

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
    826
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    Yes it is just the two of us since Zipolite, Mx. Our travel companion had a change of heart and decided to return home.


    Ok, I'll reduce the "shrinkage" a bit:jjen

    We entered Costa Rica today, by far the longest crossing of the trip, they sure like their stamps and signatures and little pieces of paper with scribbles on them.

    We met two Nederlanders at the border, Edwin and Miriam, it was fun to have company for the wait.

    [​IMG]

    If I find their blogs, I'll post link here.

    The blue room still has your name on it, we will be back home in April.

    More later
  9. De Buurman

    De Buurman Adventurer

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2011
    Oddometer:
    20
    Location:
    The Holland-land

    Hi there ac_elite,

    No need for you to post the link, because I (Edwin) have found your blog :D
    Our blog: www.ridingtheamericas.nl (It's in Dutch... but: http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=auto&tl=en&u=www.ridingtheamericas.nl )

    It was very nice to have some company from nice people wile we were trying to get in to Costa Rica!

    Did you make your way to the hostel you wanted to go to?

    We did make it to the lodge/resort we talked where we wanted to go and are now enjoying some relaxation :1drink

    Greetings and see you!
  10. V@lentino

    V@lentino Inspektor

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    We are in Playa Coco and the beach is ok but far from outstanding. We are just staying one more day, send me a link or lat/long. Is the place nice? How is the beach?

    We are thinking of heading to Samara next...
  11. De Buurman

    De Buurman Adventurer

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2011
    Oddometer:
    20
    Location:
    The Holland-land
    The beach here is nice, but not very big, it's surrounded by beach like coast with large rock formations. We've walked around the beach for a while today and did some swimming, but it's all about the same here (lots of rocky stuff).
    [[EDIT: there is a nice sandy beach to, apperantly we've walked to the wrong side this morning. It's black sand and there are big waves, but it's nice for a swim! ]]<edit: there="" is="" a="" nice="" sandy="" beach="" (if="" you="" walk="" to="" the="" south="" side...)="" it's="" black="" sand="" with="" big="" waves,="" but="" deferentially="" for="" swim!="" edit="">

    I think that for the really nice beaches you're on the wrong coast and should go to the Caribbean side (but we will enjoy that when we're on the stahlratte).

    The place we stay in is small (3 cabinas) and has a small swimming pool. It is not really close to the beach, but it is in a very nice setting (you feel like your in the jungle).

    I've checked and they do have a cabina free tomorrow night. It's nice, the owners are nice and there is a very nice restaurant, but spending a night is a bit on the pricy side in our opinion.

    The place is called "mundo milo eco lodge" and it's not far from your route if you want to go to Samara. It's easy to find on google maps. Coordinates: 10.167953,-85.80902
    http://www.mundomilo.com/

    We'll leave on the 21th. Tomorrow we're planning on getting some work done om the bikes (new oil). For the rest we're relaxing etc. :1drink

    We do not know yet where we will be going next. We have to contact a sort-off-friend who lives near San Jose and decide if we want to go there or if we're going to make another plan.</edit:>
  12. AdventurePoser

    AdventurePoser Long timer

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
    1,972
    Location:
    in The Cloud
    Hi guy,

    I was the "companion" for the first month of this ride but decided for several personal reasons to cut it short!

    It was a great ride, and I am looking forward to continuing next winter. Summer all year long is a tough concept to beat.:clap

    I've got over 500 images from Mexico…I'll start putting them up Advrider soon. MX is a great place to travel in spite of issues you may or may not actually see while down there!:clap

    Cheers,
    Steve
  13. canadian chris

    canadian chris Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2013
    Oddometer:
    285
    Location:
    Victoria, British Columbia
    you're not missing much back home - it's been hovering around the freezing mark and the town is still full of old people who can't drive :wink: I rode the ST down to Phoenix last month, where it's waiting for my December run to Oaxaca

    some questions for you & Jackie:

    where did you find secure bike parking when you were in Mexico City?

    what has been your best meal so far?

    how are you finding the humidity with all your gear on?


    ~ chris
  14. V@lentino

    V@lentino Inspektor

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    Oddometer:
    826
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    Hey Chris nice to hear from you.

    In Mexico city we stayed at hotel Cathedral at $65.00 it was a bit pricy, but it was right behind the Cathedral, so in the centre of the city where the main attractions are and it had secure parking in the hotel, included with the price. For us it was a no brainer.

    Overall we ate well but I don't think we had our best meal yet.

    We ate really well in Mexico in general, but Mexico city had by far the best Taquerias, we went to one opened since 1928. It was jam packed but the Taco al pastor and Gordas were the best "Sandwich" type meal we had.



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    We also had really good mole in Oaxaca, and I filled my flask with Mezcal reposada, right from a distillery barrel.

    In Leon, Nicaragua we had this mixed platter which had chicken wings, some type of salcichon, yuca, spicy grilled meatballs, 2 types of local cheese, frijoles (whole), and plantain cooked two ways. It was most delicious.

    [​IMG]


    Then in Granada Nicaragua, it took everything we had to find Nacatamales, they require quite a bit of prep and they are made on Saturday for the weekend, beef, chicken, or pork - picante.

    We finally found a place and it was delicious:dg

    [​IMG]


    In Costa Rica we have been eating Casado, a typical dish served with Pinto the gallo (rice and black/kidney beans), salad, platanos fritos, or broiled with either fish, chicken, beef or pork, and some type of spicy sauce.

    No pics but believe me it was some of the best food we've had.

    The place where we are staying now in Playa Carillo, CR is owned by Argentinians and they have a small restaurant attached to the rooms and we are aiming for churrasco with chimichurri so we might be in for the best meal yet:drif. Unless you happen to be the vegetarian type:rolleyes

    The gear has been hot to say the least; it's not so much the heat as much as the humidity, Nicaragua was the worst. We are looking forward to bit more altitude when we head for the volcanoes on the weekend.

    You were right about Mex 175 from Oaxaca to Puerto Angel. I am so glad that the ST workout for you.

    Now if I can get my a$$ in gear, I'll do an update to the RR


  15. arjones

    arjones Roads and Waves

    Joined:
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    Anthony Bourdain on boxer cylinders...:lol3
  16. acejones

    acejones Long timer

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    MS. Gulf Coast
    Sounds like some tasty food.
    BTW, Pinto is not a rooster. Its Pico de Gallo.
  17. V@lentino

    V@lentino Inspektor

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    :ear
    Pico de Gallo is a salsa type dish usually tomatoes, onions, cilantro, lime, etc...

    Pinto de Gallo or more appropriately Gallo Pinto is popular throughout Central America, and the Caribbean, it is made of beans and rice, usually pinto, kidney, black or black-eyed peas.

    Also known as rice and peas in Jamaica:thumb


    We've been called worst:evil
  18. V@lentino

    V@lentino Inspektor

    Joined:
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    [​IMG]

    Nicaragua was special for us, for Liliane especially. A few decades ago as a youngster she spent a couple of years in Matagalpa just as the Somoza regime was dwindling away. Her Spanish parent sent her to Central America so she would improve her Spanish. She was under the care of her older sister and brother in law, Don Heradio Gonzalez Cano. Heradio is a scholar, poet, student of Ruben Dario, and notable of Nicaraguan society; click here for his bio (it is in Spanish; Google translate is your friend).


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    He now lives in Oviedo, Asturias, España. He was forced to flee Nicaragua with his family after the Sandinist unjustly seized all his assets. We spent some time with him in 2008 when we rode through España.

    See the previous chronicles of J&V P3 for more details.

    As such, the Hotel Intercontinental is for most just another insignificant landmark in Managua. For Jackie however, sitting pillion, riding through the congested street of Managua, it brought back the long forgotten memories of a young girl visiting the capital in the company of family and friends, enjoying the sometimes guilty privileges that exist when coming of age under the hospice and shadow of notoriety.


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    Little did she know that serendipitously she would only pass here again some years later whilst riding in the back of a motorbike heading to the end of the world.

    Ainsi va la vie&#8230;

    Nicaragua was also fun because we had planned to make our first use of the Asylum&#8217;s tent space and visit Salcar, the owner and operator of Nicaragua Motorcycle Adventures. This was actually quite funny if not unusual, Salvador had warned us that he would be out of the country, and was not sure if he would be back by the time we made our way through Managua, but to stop by anyway because his mom is the one who usually plays host.


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    So we left Leon around 10:00 and about an hour later we knocked on Salvador&#8217;s door, we were warmly greeted and subsequently fed a delicious meal by the groundkeepers. They jovially introduced us to Nikita and Lucky our four legged hosts for the day. Since it was pouring out, and we have been precisely timing any inclement weather episodes with a comfortable meal or a beverage inside, we did not want to break pattern and elected to spend a lazy afternoon doing some planning for the weeks ahead. When we retired in the evening, after having made great use of the wifi we were still to meet the owners.

    Meet Nikita; Thank you Salcar for letting us in even in absentia:clap:clap


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    And Rocky


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    Early morning the next day, we enjoyed breakfast with Salcar&#8217;s mom, who had been held up late at work. We exchanged tales of Italy, where she has lived a greater part of her life, and after a warm embrace she sent us on our way heading for Granada. Thank you Salvador for you absentee hospitality, sorry we could not meet in person.

    Ansi va la vie&#8230;


    Jackie found that not much had changed from memory in Nicaragua. The Nacatamales are still delicious; it is still humid, and hotter than ever. As Salvador, I found it to be generally dirty. Dirty as with lots of trash everywhere. Waste management is inadequate at best. Evidently, the cycle of poverty, low education, lack of municipal, regional, and national infrastructures, long history of corrupt officials, exploitive elites, and foreign dominion all contribute, I suppose, to the problem. A growing population, and an equally increasing GDP, as well as development through consumerism with local markets flooded with of cheap and disposable imports are also culprit. To an extent we all share the blame.


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    The final result is a lot of trash in a lot of places. It remains very difficult for me to understand. I realize quite well that we produce more trash in the Western world, I suppose that with the quality of the infrastructures that we enjoy in countries like Canada we have learn to hide it better through recycling and other waste management programs (including trash export). It is a situation I have been confronted with before, and I still find it very difficult to put in perspective and relativize.

    Ainsi va la vie&#8230;

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    In my mostly futile attempt to comprehend I stumbled on this interesting blog piece by Antonis Mavropoulos


    Here are a few pics, I'll add more later from Leon and Granada. We finally found a nice beach in Costa Rica; currently in Playa Carillo



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    We made it through our first 10000 km, Angela will need an oil change soon.


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    So is life...
  19. acejones

    acejones Long timer

    Joined:
    May 14, 2005
    Oddometer:
    5,394
    Location:
    MS. Gulf Coast
    Thanks for the info !:1drink
  20. arjones

    arjones Roads and Waves

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2012
    Oddometer:
    211
    Location:
    Bahia, Brazil
    Beautiful post as usual!:clap

    Keep riding safe and enjoy Costa Rica. I've bee there surfing last July and there are some beautiful playas down south. If you like to see wild animals in their enviroment, here's a tip: heading south, something like 30 km before Jacó (maybe less), there's a river, Tárcoles. The little village by the river is named after it. Well, passing by the bridge above the river you will see people gathering, looking down... stop, and go with the flow. And you will see them. Big, huge ass crocs!!! Lots of them!! And you can buy some tickets no navigate the river with local guides, who know them very well, giving lots of information. Sounds touristy? Well, I thought so. My wife convinced me. Glad she did!! It's very nice.

    Keep posting, please.

    Arjones.

    P.S.: sorry about the Bourdain joke... :lol3