The 'No Pissin and Moanin' DR650 Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by AST236, Jun 29, 2012.

  1. mrprez

    mrprez KJ4WMZ

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    Take one of your tire tools and open the bead up on the opposite side of the tire next to the stem. This will give you more room to get your hand in there and move the tube into place. Also helps to have the tube partially inflated. By adding some air to the tube helps to prevent pinch flats. Another tip is to use baby powder on the tube. This allows the tube to slide easier against the tire making it easier to get the tube lined up so the stem is straight. Also helps to prevent friction between the tire and the tube.
  2. DockingPilot

    DockingPilot Hooked Up and Hard Over

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    Also if your just changing the tires and not the tubes dont take them out. After you have the top bead off simply stuff the deflated tube under the brake disc and remove the bottom bead of the tire. Take your new tire and place it over the tube where the stem is still in place. Spoon on the the rest of the bottom bead. Add some air now to tube and place it back in and finish tire install. No need to remove tube and deal with the stem. Saves time and fingers. Lol

    Sent from my SCH-I800 using Tapatalk 2
  3. russt

    russt Adventurer

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    Thanks, I have seen this method used, but was not taking the tire completly off. I toughened up last night and pulled the sidewall away while I jammed my hand up there and fished around to get the stem in the hole.
  4. russt

    russt Adventurer

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    Thanks for the suggestions. I was thinking I was going to wake up to 20 inmates telling me to
    1. Remove wheel from bike
    2. Put wheel in back of truck
    3. Drive to the ATM/ Bank
    4. Withdraw $20
    5. Drop off wheel and $20 at motorcycle shop
    Next time I will try opening up the bead on the other side, thanks. I powdered up the tube and got it in just fine, then decided to stop being weak and jammed my hand up there to fish the valve stem in place. Once the valve was in the hole, used Windex on the bead and the tire went just fine.

    Airing up the tube helps it to not pinch and twist on the bead as well. Just like a bicycle. :rofl
  5. Adv Grifter

    Adv Grifter on the road o'dreams

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    :clap:clap
    Thanks for the excellent tutorial on the Zip ties. I'd heard about these but have only used them to hold a flat tire on the wheel when out in the middle of nowhere. Never used them to mount a tire. I'll have to try it.
    Seems it would make sense to carry the Zippies on the bike with you, as a roadside flat would go easier using them to remount.

    Are they hard to pull out once tire is mounted?
    How many Zippies are used in all? Seems like at least 3 ?
    I'm thinking these Zippies are very heavy duty? Do they have a gauge number or anything?

    Thanks again! :clap
  6. JagLite

    JagLite Long timer

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    Here is a picture

    [​IMG]


    I had already removed a couple zippies when I thought to take a picture, They slip right out, no trouble at all.

    This is the front tire that i did first, I used even more zippies on the rear since I had them, the are quick and easy to install and remove, and the brand new rear knobbie has a VERY stiff carcass. The beads did not want to pull together. I think i could ride 100 miles with a flat, no problem. :rofl

    The package of zippies says on it:
    18" Heavy-Duty Cable Ties
    5" max diameter
    175 lbs
    GB (Gardner Bender) brand that I picked up at Lowes electrical department.

    There are 15 in this package.
    I agree that they would be an excellent addition to the on-board tool kit.
    They don't weigh anything and are very handy.

    I just put as many on as seemed beneficial. I don't think you could use too many and I don't know what a minimum might be. Enough to keep the two beads together I would say.

    I placed my tire tool so that it was bearing against the zippie as it is more slippery than the rubber tire.
    No idea if that made a difference or not.

    In the picture you can see the zippie I put around the tire and rim to keep it down in the well by the valve,
    You can just make out the end of the valve stem with the nut on it.
  7. Adv Grifter

    Adv Grifter on the road o'dreams

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    Perfect, thanks for the pic. Tells the whole story.
    I have a tire change coming up ... will report back on this.
    :beer
  8. rogor

    rogor Adventurer

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    anyone reading the rubbish from jonkol in the usual dr thread :rofl
    some people... :huh
  9. JagLite

    JagLite Long timer

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    Yep.

    I sure am glad I don't have a flexy frame DR. :evil

    Too bad his does. :cry

    Good thing he is the only one... :clap

    I guess the rest of us happy DR riders are ignorant of this serious design flaw that only his bike has.
  10. Adv Grifter

    Adv Grifter on the road o'dreams

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    The sad part is I think johnkol really believes the DR frame flexes. I'm convinced he has one of (or a Combo of ...) the following problems:
    1. Worn or loose Wheel, Head or Swing arm bearings ?
    2. A crack somewhere in the frame, perhaps in the steering head area or
    where swing arm attaches to main frame around linkage area??
    3. Bent forks ?
    4. Out of align frame (from previous accident) ?

    It could also be clapped out suspension, but probably one of the above issues are having an affect too .... :hmmmmm

    I don't think he is a Troll ... but somehow has got a weird DR650. He's taken a lot of Flack ... but handles it pretty well, IMO.
    I have seen (and ridden) bent frames that you can't tell are bent. But the bike handles weird ... has a mind of its own. Can be subtle, impossible to see with naked eye.

    There is a guy called The Frame Man up near Sacramento, CA who is expert at straightening ... mostly does race bikes. Excellent work ... and night and day difference once frame is perfect. There are others who provide these same services. Frame Man has been around over 20 years. I take bent wheels to him ... and one crashed bike. Perfect results!
  11. victor441

    victor441 Long timer

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    I'm totally sold on the zip tie method too, have been using six for the three Avon Roadrunners I've mounted so far but have not tackled a stiff radial yet. One other tip I picked up here that helped a lot was to buy a gallon of tire mounting lube from Napa, it really does work better than soapy water. I also made a simple fixture from a bucket to hold the wheel, mounting is much easier with the wheel held solidly at waist level.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  12. barko1

    barko1 barko1

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    Perhaps in the region above the neck:evil

    Troll?? DR worst bike ever?
  13. doug s.

    doug s. Long timer

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    either something is seriously wrong w/johnkol's bike, or he's a troll. i am leaning towards "troll" because, if he seriously thinks the bike sucks, you would think he'd be interested in riding another sample, or having it thoroughly inspected by a pro, due to the comments he's gotten from everyone else, including folks w/a lot of experience. but, his mind seems to be made up - he seems totally uninterested in checking out another dr650, or seeing whether or not some systemic problem exists w/his bike, let alone trying to improve it w/upgrades...

    doug s,
  14. outdoornate65

    outdoornate65 Adventurer

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    Hey guys....

    I've seen it mentioned a couple places that there is the ability to lower the DR650 in it's stock configuration.
    Is this correct and if so, how is it done?

    I understand using lowering links but I think this was something different.

    Thanks,

    Nate (the noob)
  15. JagLite

    JagLite Long timer

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    Yes, the DR is designed so that it can be lowered by altering the suspension.
    The shop manual has the info on how to do it.
    Don't have a shop manual yet?
    Buy one. :wink:

    Basically, the forks are removed, opened up, and the steel tube spacer that sits on top of the main springs is moved to fit on the damper rod with the top out spring.
    That lowers the forks and limits their travel by the length of the spacer.

    The rear shock is removed, pretension on the spring is released by turning the two rings on the top of the spring and once the spring is real loose the spring seat at the bottom ( a big chunk of aluminum with a slot in the side) is slipped off the shaft and turned upside down and slipped back in place. Then the spring tension rings get re-tightened and the shock gets reinstalled and bolted back in place but using the upper of the two bottom mount holes on the clevis.

    The spring seat flip limits the travel in the rear so that the tire doesn't hit the fender.
    Using the upper of the two lower mount holes in the shock clevis is what lowers the rear end of the bike.

    I have done it twice and it is not difficult if you are comfortable working with tools and following instructions.
    Some have the dealer do it but if the dealer mechanic is not familiar with the DR factory lowering I would NOT have them do it.

    I don't have my shop manual here so others may want to correct anything I have said that is not correct.
    I am going by memory and that isn't very good any more.
    Never was actually, but is worse now. :eek1

    This will lower the bike almost 2 inches.
    Suzuki sells a shorter kick stand for the lowered bikes.
    Or you can cut and weld the stock one.

    The forks can also be slid up in the clamps a bit to lower the front more without the tire hitting the fender, and lowering links can be used in the back too.
    Keep in mind that this also decreases ground clearance and suspension travel.

    My Street Tracker Sumo bike is lowered 5" in front and 4" in the rear for a lower CG.
    (I have a 19" front wheel on it)
  16. heirhead

    heirhead Been here awhile

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    Be very quiet, he might hear you as I am typing very softly.

    Heirhead
  17. Tech23

    Tech23 Been here awhile

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    How many of you guys remove both beads from the same side of the rim when dismounting a tire?

    Dunlop dismounting video....

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TVKzoaL8qaI

    Dunlop mounting video...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IMYQ6L2jKKQ

    Having all the tools used in these videos can make life easier including the Motion Pro tool that holds the bead into the drop center of the rim. There are two version of that tool so if you plan to order one make sure you order the correct one.

    Tech23
  18. Tech23

    Tech23 Been here awhile

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    Some call it buyers remorse, this often leads to neglect of the machine and complaining about it whether its a car, motorcycle, or whatever it may be. The good news is there are many other motorcycles to choose from.

    Tech23
  19. BergDonk

    BergDonk Long timer

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    Yep, been doing it this way for a long, long time.

    The stand makes it easier on the body, but not essential. I use more talcum than they do, and no assembly lube, its not needed. Nor do I use a bead buddy for assembly. This is where you use the rim lock, and by starting and finishing at the rim lock you have an easier time getting the bead into the well of the rim. So in addition to what they do, start and finish at the rim lock, and/or valve stem if you have no lock. Easy 5 min job. Also get the tyres hot. If I'm not riding to warm them up, I leave them in the sun for a bit, and do it when the day is warmer if I have a choice. A HD tube will normally hold its shape without adding air, so no need for that either unless you have std tubes. I also prefer pointier tyre irons/levers. I have a Motion Pro T6 axle spanner spoon on each bike that I reshaped a bit to get a pointier tip. Only put the lever down between where the bead is outside the rim and in the well, so small chunks at a time and it'll go on easy, and you can easily get the lever under the bead because its not in contact with anything at the spot, say 2-3" at a time.
  20. godaddygo

    godaddygo drdude

    Joined:
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    I may not be searching correctly so let me ask and thanks for the help...looking to get the instruments including the key ignition out of the "hole" and build a more Dakar panel on my DR650... All is easy except movng the key tumbler? I have read where you can rewire and use a different lock/key? ...but would be nice if there was a relacement plug and play key tumbler?...Not sure i am making sence...want to move the key out from stock location up and out...
    Chris
    Northern Idaho
    :huh