The 'No Pissin and Moanin' DR650 Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by AST236, Jun 29, 2012.

  1. planemanx15

    planemanx15 Long timer

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    Anybody have the left passenger foot peg they would like to part with? I was cleaning my chain today and it just broke off. Shoot me a PM
  2. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    that's a nice homemade tool!

    a trick i see shops doing is leave the fork cap on (this creates some tension on the fork rod so it's less likely to move) and hit the lower bolt with an air gun. this spins out the bolt faster than the inner rod can spin and the bolt comes out w/ oil too. to re assy, the just use the air gun to put it back in.
    of course they've done it enough to have the right touch, but the 1 guy I talked to said it would very hard to strip out the rod unless you just sat there and keep hitting the bolt constantly. He just stops putting it in when it feels tight and he's been doing it for over 30yrs.

    procycle has the holding tool for $30 if people don't want to build there own
    http://www.procycle.us/bikepages/dr650.html#accessories
  3. Adv Grifter

    Adv Grifter on the road o'dreams

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    You can also make a damper rod holding tool out of PVC pipe. Just notch it to hold.
    Also ... No air tools? (like me) Put allen wrench in place at fork bottom, whack it with a hammer whilst holding damper rod. Breaks loose easy, comes right out. I've even done exactly this without using a holding tool but with top cap in place. Depends how tight it is.
  4. trailrider383

    trailrider383 867-5309

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    You all are making it more complicated than need be. Take a piece of 1" od square tubing that is long enough to reach the top of the damper rod. It fits perfect.
  5. planemanx15

    planemanx15 Long timer

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    Exactly what I did, 3 foot in length in a vise to hold it.. Was returned to lowes after use lol
  6. Bronco638

    Bronco638 Nobody Home

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    Lots of great ideas. I may even have some 1" square tubing in the basement or garage. Thanks!! :thumb
  7. THB

    THB Been here awhile

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    After a long illness, I finally was able to get out and ride a bit. Put about 150 miles in.

    Florence Kelvin Hwy....
    [​IMG]

    Cozy??
    [​IMG]

    :clap
    [​IMG]

    Show off....
    [​IMG]

    Need to come back here at sunset...
    [​IMG]

    We need a motorized version....
    [​IMG]

    Mirage...
    [​IMG]

    Hope and change...
    [​IMG]

    Play???
    [​IMG]

    Would love to have walked down this street 50 years ago...
    [​IMG]
  8. Adv Grifter

    Adv Grifter on the road o'dreams

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    Thanks for sharing!
    Any nice DR friendly Two Track trails heading out into that Desert?
    To me, it all looks just like the Mojave ... but without the military, the mines, the trash and the millions of red necks in motor homes.
  9. THB

    THB Been here awhile

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    Absolutely, but once up in the hills, it can get nasty. I leave that to the WR. I don't care for bent rims at 70 mph on the highway home.
  10. ungeheuer

    ungeheuer DRongo

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    Hmmm... I've been staring at my rear suspension, thinking... and rethinking.

    And I do believe you may be right.. and I was.. *cough* ...perhaps ... um..... wrong.

    Which makes me wonder.... where's the trade-off??

    Why isn't this simple and inexpensive modification the default method of raising the rear end?
  11. Tech23

    Tech23 Been here awhile

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    That's near me. Too bad I can't ride off road anymore, looks like good riding. You ever ride back to Tortilla Flat in Apache Junction? Rt 88 is why I decided to convert my DR to a Supermoto. Love that road.

    Tech23
  12. THB

    THB Been here awhile

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    Absolutely! I had a DRZ Supermoto for a while and that was blast up at TTF.
  13. TinMan207

    TinMan207 Most often a lurker...

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    I would like to know this as well....

    Not being a mechanical guy, and having read all that I can find - and made blind assumptions - I would offer that a) most people want shorter bikes and b) (if I interpret what I have read correctly, and this is far from certain) it might put slightly more stress on that joint/hinge system.

    If people are going to manufacture and sell a custom part, it pays to focus on where the masses want to buy, ie longer links resulting in shorter bikes.

    I am with you on this issue, would love to add an inch or so to my seat height and wouldn't mind more ground clearance so I might have to find someone to help me with making some inexpensive links to experiment with before doing it correctly with more rugged components. I'm 6'5" and nearly 280lbs (dry weight) so durability will eventually be a concern.

    I am open to feedback and thoughts
  14. BluesCruiser

    BluesCruiser Adventurer

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    Thanks for the pics, THB. Makes me want to hurry up and get my old girl back on the road!:D Glad you're doing better!

    Dave
  15. el capitan

    el capitan Adventurer

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    @ ungeheuer & TinMan: As stated by TinMan, most riders want to LOWER their bikes, not make them even higher. With an inseam of 36+ inches this is no motivation for me. One probable reason for this solution not being standard might be the increasing progression the more you raise the rear compared to stock. So you need a stiffer spring for your weight, but can´t use most of the travel due to the spring hardening quickly.

    But I will rebuild my DR over the winter and plan to start off with the raising links, but the stock spring, using 7.5w fork oil instead of the 10w currently in use. This way I will get more progression (stiffening the stock spring earlier than by the use ot the stock dogbones), but with the softer stock spring maybe can use more of the travel the bike has to offer - currently I probably don´t use more than half of it, which is not reasonable.

    EDIT: The shorter dogbones are made from steel, stock is alloy. So durability should not be an issue. At 280 lbs you will have no choice but to install the 8.something-spring anyway. Doing so you will definitely need stiffer oil in your shock, too, to tame your rebound (that is near to nonexistent in stock form already and gets considerably worse, the stronger the utilized spring is).
  16. Adv Grifter

    Adv Grifter on the road o'dreams

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    Changing to a shorter link won't affect durability. Not sure who makes links to RAISE the bike ... most of the ones out there are for making it lower. For your height and weight you will need the whole package to really get the most from your DR650.

    Just a few options:
    1. Heavier springs front and rear
    2. Possible NEW shock with adjustable ride height, correct spring and damping for your weight and riding style.
    3. Foot Peg lowering kit: (Pro Cycle) gives tall guys more leg room.
    4. Custom seat: with a 2 inch "tall guy" rise.
    5. Possible aftermarket forks: these are typically LONGER than stock forks ... so helps with raising the whole bike UP. Be sure to balance rear height to match front.
    6. Rising Link to raise rear up a bit.

    Once correctly sprung I doubt you'll have ground clearance problems unless you're riding Enduros on your bike. The DR is not really a good technical trail bike. But for just about anything else it's not too bad.
  17. TinMan207

    TinMan207 Most often a lurker...

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    #1 - done - by the previous owner - Racetech gold valves and heavier springs
    #2 - done - also by the previous owner - Cogent rebuilt shock and spring
    #3 - on my short list of new projects but doesn't really get the seat higher - I really liked the height of my son's DRZ, and that is sort of the impetus for this thought process
    #4 - have a Renzaco seat, but It's not a "tall guy" version. It's a possible option down the road, but links would be a much cheaper option :deal
    #5 - mmmm yeah, a possible option. I see a lot of guys doing this, but probably past my level of confidence at the moment - and again, more expensive than shorter links I assume.
    #6 - The reason for this conversation, and I am grateful for your input.

    I really don't need more ground clearance - and I don't ever expect to ride my DR in an Enduro. It does everything that I want it to do quite well. And to be honest my riding ability is a far greater impediment to where I go than the capabilities of the bike. I just like a tall (Inexpensive and durable) bike.

    Thank you for your input!

    gregg
  18. Bronco638

    Bronco638 Nobody Home

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    Can anyone help me identify an Eibach shock spring I have? I was part of the spares that came with my DR.

    It's painted that dark tomato red. There are two numbers on it; 45038 and 0800.250.1100

    Any help is appreciated. TIA, Dave.
  19. ungeheuer

    ungeheuer DRongo

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  20. el capitan

    el capitan Adventurer

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    Ungeheuer, I also got quite a bit of information from forums like this one that helped me understand various topics and to improve my bike. At least it´s no expensive tryout - let me know your impressions after a testride!