The official XT225 thread!

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by wickerman777, Nov 4, 2006.

  1. Tom S

    Tom S Can I ride it?

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2004
    Oddometer:
    4,637
    Location:
    Anchorage Alaska
    I’m very familiar with all kinds of mechanical washers but .... Electrical washer?
    Is that something Ace or True Value would have in their bins?

    Looked 'em up. Found this. Looks too big. :hide


    [​IMG]
  2. Tom S

    Tom S Can I ride it?

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2004
    Oddometer:
    4,637
    Location:
    Anchorage Alaska
    One more ... :lol3

    [​IMG]
  3. kewlbyme

    kewlbyme Occasional Partaker

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2006
    Oddometer:
    228
    Location:
    Woodstock, GA
    I found no online specs so I took the needle to my local Ace Hardware and fit stainless washers just the right size, ID and OD. I forget the size. I will see next time I go and put it here.
  4. Tom S

    Tom S Can I ride it?

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2004
    Oddometer:
    4,637
    Location:
    Anchorage Alaska
    It’s the thickness that’ most important. :thumb
  5. tuna101

    tuna101 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2012
    Oddometer:
    253
    Location:
    Joshua Tree,Ca.
    Thanks to all for your input on putting my bike back to stock. Should receive the carb soon(Sat.) Will post with results next week after install. Has anybody used the Keintech adjustable Pilot Screw? How did it work for you?
  6. kewlbyme

    kewlbyme Occasional Partaker

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2006
    Oddometer:
    228
    Location:
    Woodstock, GA
    I had one on my klr. It's pretty much set and leave it alone. But it is handy when you are adjusting. If yours works, please let us know. I'd like to add one.

    Sent from my Galaxy Nexus using Tapatalk 2
  7. kewlbyme

    kewlbyme Occasional Partaker

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2006
    Oddometer:
    228
    Location:
    Woodstock, GA
    They are pretty thin. Proportional to the diameter, if you will. I have to lick my finger to get the washer to stick to it to pick it up from a flat surface. That thin.

    Sent from my Galaxy Nexus using Tapatalk 2
  8. Tom S

    Tom S Can I ride it?

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2004
    Oddometer:
    4,637
    Location:
    Anchorage Alaska
    Hmm... :thumb
  9. dav_dman

    dav_dman Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2010
    Oddometer:
    857
    Location:
    louisville ky/southern indiana
    yeah i got two inch riser and i dont recall if any slack after that...but two inch worked great, big diff.
  10. maverick1

    maverick1 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2009
    Oddometer:
    31
    Location:
    Lake Elsinore, CA
    "That's what my old lady keeps saying".:D
  11. maverick1

    maverick1 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2009
    Oddometer:
    31
    Location:
    Lake Elsinore, CA
    I was really surprised at how capable my new (used 2001) XT225 is at climbing really steep terrain.
    So far I've made every single hill I've attempted.
    The picture does not do it justice at just how steep that hill was. [​IMG]
    No slipping, sliding, rear tire just grips and pushes.
    [​IMG]
    I have the Kenda 270's front and rear.
    [​IMG]
  12. kingbee

    kingbee Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 20, 2007
    Oddometer:
    180
    Location:
    Western U.P.
    On Mikuni carbs with adjustable needles, the slots are 1mm apart. When I set up the carb on my (wife's) XT, I made a shim from a nylon R/C aircraft control horn. It is 1.5 mm thick, of the equivalent of a slot and a half if these bikes had adjustable needles which they don't.

    You can probably find suitable small washers at a hardware store- take a micrometer or caliper with you to check thickness. Or you could order them here: http://www.motorcyclecarbs.com/Jet_Needle_Shim_Pack_12__P10478.cfm

    Cheers,
    Dave
  13. wesdawg

    wesdawg Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2009
    Oddometer:
    168
    Location:
    Charlotte
    GlennR, I'm running renthal Atv bars on my xt and I ran into a problem with the bar ends... I'm not sure if all Atv bars are this way, but mine had the reinforcing inner sleeve (or thicker diameter tube) extend into the area where the bark buster expansion bolt would normally go. This took a lot of modifying but I finally got the bars to work. As for height, I love the way it allows me to comfortably stand. The problem with going to high will be modifying the cable lengths for throttle, brake, clutch...
  14. wesdawg

    wesdawg Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2009
    Oddometer:
    168
    Location:
    Charlotte
    Correction renthal = pro taper
  15. Tom S

    Tom S Can I ride it?

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2004
    Oddometer:
    4,637
    Location:
    Anchorage Alaska
    Thanks, Kingbee, that’s what I was looking for. Been years since I put a shim from a kit in a Keihin carb & couldn’t remember how thick it was. I only remembered that any thin washer that I measured was considerably thicker.
    Per your link the shims are .5mm or just a hair under .02”, (0.01968498”), thick.
    Oftentimes you don’t want to make much of a change to the needle height. Surprised that you went up 1.5mm.
  16. KamperBob

    KamperBob Recreation Engineer

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2009
    Oddometer:
    254
    Location:
    Somewhere USA
    As some may recall in late August @24k miles I replaced the rear sprocket and chain on my 2006 XT225. (The sprocket was 45T stock size but aftermarket brand.)

    Instead of another O-ring chain I bought two standard (unsealed) chains. Chain #1 was replaced in late October @26k miles. It measured 60.375" long. Chain #2 new measured 60" long. So it stretched 0.375" or 0.63% in 2k miles. Chain #2 was replaced today (late December) @28k miles. It measured 60.25" so stretch was 0.25" or 0.42% in 2k miles.

    Caveats:
    * While mileage was similar between these two intervals road/trail conditions were very different. So this isn't really a "fair" comparison. Still some might be interested in these measurements anyway.
    * In both cases the "other" chain gets washed in gas (kerosene not readily available). Then after drying soaked in 30W oil for at least a week. Then drip dried before reinstallation.

    The experiment continues. Going forward I'll keep a close eye on chain and sprocket wear during round #2 for both chains. I can swap sooner (ie, every 1k miles) if needed. Meanwhile, Plan A is to keep playing leap-frog between both chains every 2k miles.

    Cheers
    Bob
  17. kewlbyme

    kewlbyme Occasional Partaker

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2006
    Oddometer:
    228
    Location:
    Woodstock, GA
    Interesting. I missed the set up.

    Any surface cleaning or lube between swaps?

    Any sign of sprocket wear?

    I will look for updates.



    Sent from my Galaxy Nexus using Tapatalk 2
  18. woofer2609

    woofer2609 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2011
    Oddometer:
    852
    Location:
    Extreme Pacific SouthWest (of Canada)
    Cool Stuff, KamperBob, interestingly, I have the same maintenance routine on my commuter bicycle. I swap chains (but not sprockets) approximately every 6 months or 2200km's, and after 2 years, or two rotations on both, I replace the whole drive train.
    I know this'll make me sound like a know it all, but chains don't actually stretch, they develop play between the rivets and the plates.:mully
    Now, if only we could turn the rear sprocket over, think of the tooth life!
  19. Tom S

    Tom S Can I ride it?

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2004
    Oddometer:
    4,637
    Location:
    Anchorage Alaska
    Bob, I may be wrong but I think that the point of cleaning the chain with kerosene is for O-ring chains as other stuff, including WD-40, is supposed to be hard on the O-rings.
    If you really want kerosene, as chain makers recommend, I believe that you could substitute diesel fuel. Diesel is at most any gas station & nearly the same thing as kerosene.
    I read that one main difference between kerosene & diesel is that kerosene does not have the lubrication properties that diesel does. Kerosene is added to diesel fuel to winterize the diesel.
    Last time I cleaned an O-ring chain real good I had a small amount of cleaning solvent in a gallon jug. I mixed some diesel in with it to have enough to submerge the chain & shake it around & so on.

    As for soaking the chain in oil....
    Years ago before they made O-ring chains I would put the chain in a pan of oil & heat it on the stove. Must have read that method in a MC magazine.
    (X-)Wives love it too. :lol3
  20. inroads

    inroads Wimberley,Texas

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2010
    Oddometer:
    292
    WD 40 has changed its formula somewhat thru the years.You use to be able to spray it into the intake almost like some diluted ether and have the bike fire off.
    Today's stuff is more tame.My point is: I use wd 40 extensively as a cleaner to keep my o-ring chain clean as to not ever get to a build up.I believe the problem with most chain lubes is they are not wiped clean after application and then tend to attract dirt.
    So I have gotten to the point since I ride off road often to just use wd-40 liberally and wipe clean after use.
    Many bikes and many years of WD-40 o-ring use with good results.But you do have to apply twice as often as chain lube.
    I do not believe todays WD-40 hurts O-ring chains.