The TAT Preparation Thread-the logistical side of it

Discussion in 'Americas' started by leftystrat62, Dec 13, 2012.

  1. leftystrat62

    leftystrat62 Adventurer

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    Yea that works if your not camping when it's cold. Unless I'm mistaken, I'll be camping in 30F or less when I get farther out West in Sept. I do it all the time here in New England with my bike and I find riding below 55F without heated jacket/gloves-I'm really bumming-even with heated grips. Strange because I can ice climb all day in 5F with much less clothing,but I'm almost always moving so I'm sure that's the difference.
    I'm not trying to be argumentative, I just don't want you guys to think I want to take stuff "just in case",I really do want to only carry what I'll need so keep that comments coming.:deal
    #61
  2. DockingPilot

    DockingPilot Hooked Up and Hard Over

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    I can tell you after sunset and in the mornings in Sept. west of the front range it was frikin freezin ! Lol


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    #62
  3. One Less Harley

    One Less Harley OH.THAT'S GONNA HURT

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    not sure why you have seven water bottles, that's a whole lotta space!!!, but a camel back and the bladder will be plenty. Great thing about the bladder is that it rolls up when not needed. I only had mine filled up in Nevada.

    You should be able to pack what yo need int eh wolfman saddle bags, a medium tank bag and medium duffel.

    Biggest things for me were, the netbook (better options now), small stove, sleeping bag. and food/snakcs.

    I really liked the Big agnes seedhouse 2 tent and the air mattress.

    One handy item was the camp saw (Sven), used it twice and was glad to have it.

    [​IMG]

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    Plus this Trail stand is nice to have and packs up small.

    [​IMG]



    Going in Sept, yeah it might be pretty cold at those higher elevations. I only needed cold weather gear in CO and Oregon, but was glad to have it, but yeah adds a lot of weight and space.

    Go through all the bearing on the bike, wheel bearings, head set and swing arm.

    Here's my camp and clothing list
    #63
  4. rufus

    rufus We're burning daylight...

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    A tire mousse may not survive at high speeds. I have seen guys scooping rubber chunks out of their tire so they could put a tube in. Heat, speed and rough ground can destroy a mousse. Tire balls will melt. I have seen it happen in 20 miles of road riding.
    #64
  5. leftystrat62

    leftystrat62 Adventurer

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    I know,I'm up,I'm down ,I'm in , I'm out on the Mousse-wish I had a crystal ball to see how it would hold up on the 3 days at 65 mph on the highway. I've been watching this thread: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=740763
    it's about using Mousse for a dual sport. Neduro and a few others seem to think it can do the TAT and some highway as long as you stay below 65 mph. Honestly I've got no tire changing experience except for the set that's on there now,and boy I know I'll be nervous on my first flat by myself. Was hoping the Mousse might make that problem go away. Denial-that's the best preparation:muutt
    #65
  6. leftystrat62

    leftystrat62 Adventurer

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    Maybe I should scrap the water bottles? If I do carry then they're al strapped to the outside of my saddle bags in holders so I don't use up any valuable space. That was one of the reasons I thought of carrying my water that way.I remember reading that one will need 2 gal of water a day when in the desert-maybe that's too much?
    what do I know, I've never been more than 2 blocks from a store that sells water,lol. My reasoning for the water bottles being carried that way(as opposed to just a dromedary) is because the weight would be down lower than if I carry the bladder which would be up high. I was thinking of carrying the bladder empty and only fill it at the very end of the day if I had a chance as extra insurance while in the desert,but maybe I should do one or the other.
    There's a few things that I think about that make me anxious doing this trip solo:
    too much weight,running out of fuel,getting lost,breaking down,and running out of water-and I think fuel & water are at the top.
    #66
  7. leftystrat62

    leftystrat62 Adventurer

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    I actually can pack everything in my wolfman saddlebags,tank bag,and med wolfman duffel-I've done 2 four day shake down trips like that with all my tat gear; I just wasn't crazy how there was so much weight on the back tail and up so high. That's why I tried the giant loop bag,but it can only fit about 2/3rds of the gear the med duffel can. I can feel the difference with the weight down lower when I used the GL ,but it's not really meant to be used the way I'm trying to use it.
    I have gone through my wheel and swing arm bearings and will do it again before I leave,just don't have a clue how to do the head set. What are you doing this weekend:lol3
    #67
  8. leftystrat62

    leftystrat62 Adventurer

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    you mean like this while out last month- note the 23F displayed
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    #68
  9. One Less Harley

    One Less Harley OH.THAT'S GONNA HURT

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    "Neduro and a few others seem to think it can do the TAT and some highway as long as you stay below 65 mph"

    stick to tubes, don't take the word from others,,"seem to think," unacceptable.

    As far as water goes, only place it is an issue would be Nevada and Black Dragon/Eagle and Cat Canyons in Utah.

    I found the only place I needed water was in Black dragon Canyon, I drained the camel back but was with two other riders. I didn't have the bladder filled, but carried a 24oz water bottle on the side strap thingies on the Wolfman. The wolfman has those water bottle holders, I used them one for oil, chain lube, air filter oil and 24oz water bottle.

    Most days the camel back alone will be plenty as there are places to fill up during the day. I used lunch stops to restock toilet paper too. If camping figure some sort of lunch stop which won't be hard to find. Our group ate out 90% of the time, so food isn't an issue, plus we usually enjoyed imported beer every night!!! It's good to have some food just in case or the evening meal at camp. Dehydrated stuff is small and not to bad to eat.

    You're going later in the year so I suspect water will be less of an issue, except would want to fill the bladder up for night time cooking and camping for personal hygiene.

    Really you need to get comfortable doing tire changes it will take 3-4 changes to get your technique down. A small can of WD40 for tire tube is quite helpful. You need someone to show you what to look out for as not to pinch a tube!!! Plus how to patch a tube.

    I never went below 18 psi, and never had a flat and hit some pretty good stuff in Utah. 4mil tube front and 3mil rear.

    a little item I forgot and was quite glad to have later was a bandana to cover my neck from the 4weeks in the sun.

    Make sure your boots and seat are comfortable, I had few miles on a Corbin and it was pure hell for 4 of 5 weeks, boots wore blisters on my heels after much walking in Black Dragon Canyon. Even w/ band aids and mole skin it was painful...and nothing helped my ass!!!!
    #69
  10. One Less Harley

    One Less Harley OH.THAT'S GONNA HURT

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    One of the many great things about the TAT, is the great memories you'll have after doing the trip. It ranks up there with the top 2-3 things I've ever done. Doing a RR with pictures is a great way to remember the adventure. I did a short TAT, TN, MS and Ar, and found out I had forgotten a lot of the roads and sights.

    Ride within your ability, as it's a long trip and crashing out by being stupid isn't something you'll want to experience. The goal is to finish speed isn't worth it...especially solo.

    I'll tell you, one minute you can be moving right along all happy and content, but then wham someting can happen to change then whole trip. I had just gone over Marshal Pass, the 1st mountain pass...and just got on a short highway section then pow....the motor died and I coasted to a stop.......I'll tell you a lot of things go through your mind in a hurry..trip over....long way from home.....this is gonna be costly....etc. Luckily it was a relatively simple fix, noting a 20 mile tow and a day and 1/2 layover wouldn't cure. Now we really enjoyed the riding, but also usually had one day off per week of relaxing in some hole in the wall place. This was nice to look over the bikes, do laundry and suck down some nice cold beer. we had about 3 days off due to, broken shift lever, lost contact lens and one other day for some reason. Going solo give you the freedom to go at your own pace, but might get a little boring. I was lucky to find two old dues...(I hope you guys are reading this) to ride with. For guys who had never met before things went pretty well for 4 weeks, a few small differences, but I still have fond memories of the trip and both guys.
    #70
  11. leftystrat62

    leftystrat62 Adventurer

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    I appreciate all your input. I read your RR last year and asked you quite a few questions as I thought I was going to be able to ride it this past Sept. There's so many ways to skin "this " cat, lot of things to think about.
    #71
  12. leftystrat62

    leftystrat62 Adventurer

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    I'd love to hear what people used to maintain their chain on the TAT? I read some good stuff about this teflon lub for chain use and thought it would work well because of it's size
    [​IMG]

    I just don't know what to use or how to take care of a chain if your unable to clean it properly first before it gets lubed? I think it was Docking pilot who said he only used WD-40 for the chain-but if your still out there Frank feel free to chime in.:deal
    #72
  13. xathor

    xathor Not actually Gnarly

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    EDIT: OP asked me to remove my post.
    #73
  14. One Less Harley

    One Less Harley OH.THAT'S GONNA HURT

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    I used two cans of chain lube on the trip, probably 4 cans between three bikes. Like I said oiled every morning, but should have oiled it at the end of the ride while warm. I never cleaned the chain.

    Only cleaned air filter once, and it wasn't too terribly bad, but that all depends on where the intake is located plus, you're going solo, so there will be less dust.
    #74
  15. xathor

    xathor Not actually Gnarly

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    They are pre-made routes in Google Earth.
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  16. Blaise W

    Blaise W Been here awhile

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    Lefty, you shouldn't have to worry too much about cleaning your chain. It's running all the time and there won't be that much mud. Just carry one can of spray lube, O-Ring safe stuff made for chains, and replace it along the way. Plenty of bike shops and auto parts houses to buy from. I also carried a very small bottle of silicone spray to keep my zippers working (they get hard when dusty) and to keep the ignition switch working nicely.
    #76
  17. DR. Rock

    DR. Rock Part of the problem

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    Ditch the roll charts. Cut the relevant pages out of the atlases, and ditch the rest. Consider Garmin's 24K topos -- routeable like City navigator, but detailed with terrain.

    Ditch the water bottles. Keep your camelbak refilled at each gas stop. You should drink a minimum of 2L while riding during the day. When it's cool and dry, you will have to force yourself to drink that much. You'll get liquids with meals too, don't forget. If you're sweating a lot, then drink more. If you're not thirsty, drink at least the 2 liters. If you're thirsty, then drink more. If you're eating a normal diet, then you don't need any of that electrolyte replacement neon-colored crap. Pure marketing genius is all it is. At your last gas stop for the day, fill the dromedary too if you anticipate no water at your camp destination.

    For emergencies, (and even for campsite pump water early / late season the water isn't certified, they recommend filter and/or boiling), get a filter, we use the Kadadyn Hiker pro. Even in the desert you will cross water every so often.

    If you need a bottle to carry water for a section or two, buy 2 liters of soda or water, and refill it. On occasion, we've even bought some horrid off-brand "cola" for 89¢ and immediately dumped it in the parking lot, went back into the store and refilled the empty with water.

    Consider Sweetcheeks; we refill the bottles with gas when we have to, then ditch them and buy new bottles. Fill with water when needed, otherwise run them empty, nearly weightless and makes a dirt bike seat tolerable for long straight stretches.

    Way too many gloves. Consider heated grips, one pair of riding gloves, and one pair of camp gloves (for collecting firewood, chopping, grabbing hot pots, etc)

    Tool kit looks good.
    Kermit is totally worth it's weight.
    So is this pillow.
    Down still rocks. Keep it dry.

    I don't run heated clothes -- too much to tangle in the event of a rider-bike disconnect (crash). Others swear by them.
    If you're going to run a heated vest, etc, then definitely ditch the layers. If you want all the layers, then ditch the heated gear.

    You can restock proper dehydrated meals in any bigger town that has an outfitter -- elk country. But also regular grocery stores have: Ramen, mac & cheese, salami, canned stew, chili, tuna, salad-in-a-bag... etc. You should have enough food with you to survive two days, but you will be able to buy groceries when you buy gas. We keep the dehydrated meals for emergencies and desperation, otherwise we're cooking fresh food we picked up that day whenever possible.

    Chain maintenance: I've tried it all. No lube, teflon spray, auto-oilers, silicone spray. My current system: I carry a small leakproof nalgene bottle of gear oil, and a separate drip nozzle that I store in a pill bottle so it doesn't mess anything else up. At the end of each day (and at gas stops if it's really dusty / dirty), I inspect the chain, and then run a bead of gear oil on everyplace that's easily accessible. I don't go nuts, but I do it consistently. I am happy with this system. It is the first time I haven't replaced chains and sprockets after 5-6000 miles.

    Remind me, have I sent you our packing list excel spreadsheet?
    #77
  18. xathor

    xathor Not actually Gnarly

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    EDIT: OP asked me to remove my link to a KML of the TAT.
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  19. leftystrat62

    leftystrat62 Adventurer

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    Good stuff Dr Rock-guess I'll be doing some ditching. I sure would like to se what your using for gloves? I'm reading it can be from 30-100F across the board-I sure haven't found one glove that works for those temps. Do you guys no bother with trying to carry a water proof glove? I sure would like to narrow it down to one glove:thumbup
    And I would appreciate a copy of your packing list when you get the chance. cheers
    #79
  20. One Less Harley

    One Less Harley OH.THAT'S GONNA HURT

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    I used heated grips and eel skin gauntlet gloves (aero stich). Plus a thin set of work gloves for tire changes. They weren't water proof, but we were lucky. Bark busters will help keep air off your hands, plus good ones will negate the need for extra levers.

    I like to carry mixed nuts, for snaking on plus good energy just in case. Usually I had three freeze dried bags, 2 servings each. Plus only had a small pot for the stove, and a metal cup for hot chocolate/tea. There are concentrated drink mixes you can buy for a liquid sugar fix. You shouldn't need a lot of pots and pans, should be able to get by with a small one.

    There are plenty of places to get food, so your not gonna starve! Unless you break down in Nevada....

    I used a small a Butterfly chair, but prefered a camp rite three legged one. easy to pull out as use as a stool, or lean it up against the a tree.
    #80