The Toolkit Thread

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by hilslamer, Sep 2, 2007.

  1. frewhl

    frewhl daily rider

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    Thanks for the good tool thread
    #41
  2. Lobby

    Lobby Viel Spass, Vato!

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    Really good post. :clap
    #42
  3. hilslamer

    hilslamer 2XRedheadedstepchild

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    Well put, J-5. My sentiments exactly. Are you stalking me or something?
    #43
  4. ldeikis

    ldeikis Dirty daydreamer

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    This is a solid thread, doing something we've done before but awfully completely.

    +1 on this concept. My hippo has no useful tool storage, but it's amazing how much you can thin out of your tool roll if you mount the things you don't need often to the bike itself. You can also carry the weight lower, that way--a spare clutch and brake lever, ground down to shorties, zip tied inside the bash plate; tire levers hose-clamped with some foam to the frame, etc. You can also stash several things of quicksteel in various places on most bikes.

    I don't carry a pharmacy as complete as the one here, but I'd recommend to anyone who's ever more than a casual hike from civilization to carry some water purifying tablets. I place them against the inside of one of the side covers on the bike, lay a piece of plastic over them, then put a layer of duct tape over that. The plastic keeps the duct tape from tearing them open upon removal, and the duct tape keeps them secure enough that they don't vibrate to powder. Safe drinking water can be the difference between a big pain in the ass and something worse. I guess you could keep your whole "pharmacy" that way, labeled under different pieces of tape if you so desired.

    It may go without saying, but if you only use your toll roll when you work on the bike in the garage, with no additional effort or thought you'll constantly be aware of its abilities and limitations. Whether you need a certain size wrench, or whether you can use the adjustable, will be a different thing to everyone's machine. I know the only things I can't do on the KLR (within reason) using the tool roll is change the drive sprocket and remove the swingarm. No need to wonder, cause I always work out of the roll.

    Luke

    edit:
    This is what I have... plus some duct tape, longer stronger zip ties, quicksteel, and two long length of wire with alligator clips on them (stashed on the bike itself). I also carry a little multimeter from ratshack, but it sort of migrates from place to place:

    [​IMG]

    My homemade KLR tool roll. In the slotted pockets: OEM spark plug socket; box/open wrenches: 8mm,10mm,11mm,12mm,14mm,17mm; spare motor mount bolt; small assorted zip ties; 3/8" drive Craftsman socket wrench; 8" Craftsman adjustable wrench; 3 motion pro tire levers; needle nose pliers and Vice Grips (in a slot behind the orange pouch). There's an assortment of nuts, bolts, washers, and cotter pins that live in the velcro pouch under my name on the left. In the orange zippered pouch: 4-in-1 screwdriver; shorty 8mm wrench; hose clamps; sockets: 6mm, 7mm, 8mm, 10mm, 11mm, 12mm, 14mm, 17mm, 18mm; 3/8" to 1/4" adaptor; 3 inch extension; 3/8" universal socket joint; Allen wrenches: 3mm, 4mm, 5mm, 6mm; spare spark plug; spark plug gapper; MotionPro bead-buddy tool; mechanic's wire; electric tape; elastic loop for holding brake calipers when wheel's off.

    This lives in a little tail pack along with a tube and a pump and a patch kit. The tailbag was made by some company or other but tore to hell from living on the bike. I sewed a couple compression straps that hold it down pretty snug and are reasonably easy to deal with... still looking for the ideal solution. I had a fender bag that managed to eject itself several times, the final time without my noticing. If I bought another one, I'd rivet it to the fender. Thank god it only had a tube in it when it took off last time.
    #44
  5. VelvtRide

    VelvtRide i can haz a motrsykle?

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    Did read the whole thread, but was wondering where you purchased the sack you stuff all that in? I like it. :thumb
    #45
  6. Meatwad

    Meatwad NimRod

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  7. VelvtRide

    VelvtRide i can haz a motrsykle?

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    For what duration have you used this with fuel in it? Did you have to transport it at all and if you did, how did you tie it down without busting the seams or popping the cap? :ear I would have thought the fumes and crap in the fuel would melt or disentegrate the mylar.



    Thanks for starting the thread - you've given me much to think about. You should post a link to this in the Trip Planning Forum. :thumb
    #47
  8. VelvtRide

    VelvtRide i can haz a motrsykle?

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    #48
  9. hilslamer

    hilslamer 2XRedheadedstepchild

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    Weeks! They won't turn into a science experiment. I filled it, had stuck it back into my backpack and not emptied it entirely, and left it sittign in my backpack for weeks with no deterioration.

    Test it out beforehand, I guess, If you don't trust it. That's what I didthe first time the notion struck me to use the bladders - I filled it, let it sit in the sun and get to full vapor pressure, and then bounced on it a bit to test the cap seals and seams. These bladders are STRONG!!!

    I choose that particular bladder because it fits really well in a anarrow backpack when filled. Most other bladders are like a wine box bladder: square and awkward when filled. Some other bladders, however, have enough material outside the seams the you could easily install grommets at the corners to be able to tie the bladder down....although, I would only consider this in an emergency. I carry mine in my pack because it seems a lot safer than having it exposed on the bike, as crazy as that sounds. Also, it gets a much better/smoother ride on your body.
    #49
  10. rallyhound

    rallyhound Macho stud guy

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    .


    # 1 weight on your body can be moved to aid in bike control, front to rear and side to side.

    #2 body mounted gear takes less abuse than bike mounted gear( doesn't get bounced around as much).

    #3 good enough for Dakar and ISDE competitors, good enough for me.
    #50
  11. manden

    manden n00b

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    Great post just dropped close to $300 at my local dealer for tools. I'm afraid to ask but what about spare parts do you bring with you? Also do some tools remain at home for shorter rides or is that pack a never-leave-home-without-it deal?
    Thanks
    #51
  12. Hair

    Hair Outside the boxer

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    Great thread.

    I have experienced some problems with Alieve Gel caps. They tend to melt and leak when they get hot. I am not sure what is inside of those caps. But I will almost guarantee you that it will taste worse than anything else that you have ever experienced.


    I haven’t been carrying a kit. And add to the problem is the fact that I ride alone. I feel that my clock has been ticking for quite some time now. I need to get on this.
    #52
  13. ibafran

    ibafran villagidiot

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    thanx for that input.

    for every action, there is an equal and opposit reaction. Thus, I remain unconvinced. backpacking, among many other activities, has convinced me that carrying any unnecessary thing on my person is usually a bad idea over the long run/ride.

    i am still open to discussion. i can see having some critical stuff on my person if separated from the bike, like the cell phone, ID, medical info, tracking device.

    not to hijack the thread, but sorting out the critical personal gear from the stuff packed on the bike might give some insight. reasons should be given. Thus:

    wrenches/tools for the bike dont need to be on my person if properly secured to the bike to prevent loss. i would hate to fall on the tool roll. i would also hate to fall into deep water and have to decide to jetison the gear belt in total.

    the med kit, cell phone, small LED light, and the fire starter might be better on my person. i would hate to lose such gear with the loss/separation of my ride. thus, in desert conditions, wearing the hydration system seems better than packing it.

    Notice that backpackers tend to actually weigh their gear. Racers weigh their gear.

    some off-roaders should weigh their stuff on their person and let us know how much they carry.
    #53
  14. ibafran

    ibafran villagidiot

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    nice thread, hilslamer.

    good point on the flashlight and how to use it.

    i am reminded of my caving days. certain gear ought to be redundant to some extent. cavers carry 3 sources of light as a minimum. amazingly to me, i discovered 3 light sources in my kit when i laid it out for inventory after reading this thread.

    it didnt surprise me that there are 3 sources of fire in my kit. 4, if you count the bike itself. if the el cheapo butane lighter loses its fuel, dont consider it worthless. it still has flint&steel, as a nearly last resort.

    KUDOS: to all the posts of old dirt bike tips like hose clamping the tire irons to the bike frame. stretchy PVC electrical tape is sterile and will hold small cuts together nicely if not wrapped too tight for circulation. the small tin will hold a lot of small bits like tire valve cores, cable ends, fuses etc. pack a bit of foam in there to keep the rattle down. and wrap the tin with a rubber band cut from an inner tube. a regular rubber band will not take the stress of off-road.
    #54
  15. cat

    cat Long timer

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    Yes, +1. Thank you. ...Even links to where to get the stuff.

    I'm not sure if I want to use a waist pack, but I was wondering if this good Ogio one would also have space for the other stuff I carry. Obviously, it does have enough space for at least one Fenix. And a medium size Spyderco wouldn't be a problem. But maybe my first-aid kit and some of the other edc stuff I like to carry would be too much for it if I carried that much tools and spares.
    #55
  16. garandman

    garandman Wandering Minstrel

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    I bought a
    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica]Cruz Tools - Outback'r M14 Folding Metric Tool Set[/FONT]

    to keep in my tank bag - and used it twice already!
    [​IMG]
    #56
  17. Roadracer_Al

    Roadracer_Al louder, louder, louder!

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    Maybe it's the old roadracer thing, but I never leave on a long trip without safety wire and safety wire pliers. I've never even heard of Iconel wire, but that stuff sounds DAMN cool. The safety wire is stainless, so it's not as high strength, but is also not going to turn your pack orange.

    I'm also very fond of the 4-in-1 screwdrivers. As pointed out, they're actually 5-in-1 as they have a 5/16" hex driver.

    The 5/16 size of the bits is slightly less common than the 1/4" hex, which is the size used in the "cordless screwdriver bit kits" like this:

    http://www.electronix.com/catalog/images/sd242.jpg

    There are "manual" screwdrivers that take this size bit such as this one:

    <small class="xs">http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00941467000P?sbf=Brand&sbv=Craftsman&filter=
    Type%7CScrewdrivers&vName=Tools&cName=Hand+Tools%2C+General+Purpose&sName=
    Screwdrivers

    </small>Sorry, the link is a mile long. Anyway, you can raid the "bit kit" for metric allen bits and torx bits if your bike has them.
    #57
  18. starchaser

    starchaser Been here awhile

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    Excellent thread and well written.
    #58
  19. nfranco

    nfranco over macho grande?

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    Awesome thread, thanks. Is this wrench part of a set and do you remember which one? I can't find it on the husky web site or in any stores by it's self.
    Thanks, nick

    #59
  20. ra2bach

    ra2bach drive-by poster

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    I found it at HomeDepot. by itself with six screwdriver points and the 5/16" to 1/4" converter to use 1/4" drive sockets. I also take a 1/4" extension and another converter to fit into tight places.

    it's very nice but I wonder how sturdy it is.
    #60