The Toolkit Thread

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by hilslamer, Sep 2, 2007.

  1. FYYFF

    FYYFF Forever young...

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    Does anybody have Adventure Designs' KTM990 Tool Kit.
    Price is a little steep at $230 but if it is a complete set, maybe it is a better deal than shopping around for each piece individually.
    I was planning to make a set up using MotionPro's titanium wrenches and above metric tool but Adventure Designs' kit seems to be a complete one. Can anyone confirm that? :ear
  2. Mercury264

    Mercury264 Once you go Triple...

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    :huh

    I do love these 'complete' toolkits :lol3

    You can buy all the pieces in that toolkit using good quality tools for less than a hundred bucks - hell, even 50 may cover it.
  3. FYYFF

    FYYFF Forever young...

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    :lol3
  4. hilslamer

    hilslamer 2XRedheadedstepchild

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    Well said, and EXACTLY the intent of this thread/information exchange session. I never explicitly state it in these terms, but: everyone's toolkit had special needs based on their bike, accessories, conditions, age, physical handicaps(like busted fingers or wrists that don't bend, for example).

    This is why it is SO ESSENTIAL that a kit assembled for YOUR needs is used in every way that it can be anticipated that it will be needed in the field PRIOR TO THAT NEED in the "comfort of your own home/workshop/garage/carport/hogan/lean-to/hovel/tarp-tent/private raincloud etc." so that deficiencies and shortcomings can be identified, redundancies pruned out, and excesses trimmed to bare needs to meet weight minimization requirements...all without risking functionality or reliability for multiple use and anticipated abuses. In profound retrospect, I did not and cannot emphasize this most-important consideration with respect to amassing toolkits for any purpose adequately enough, but in this case prominently motorcycles.

    I don't know anyone at MotionPro personally, but I'd gladly work as a consultant! ;) I feel like most of their products meet the above criteria, barring outright abuse.

    The trouble with the term "abuse" is that one man's use is another's abuse and trying to tell either one to use a tool harder or softer, respectively, is akin to trying to tell someone who genuinely thinks they "know" how to shift/clutch/double clutch a manual transmission...everyone does it differently and only those that have a true understanding of the physics and mechanical kinematics invloved in all of the individual mechanisms as well as the sum of them when in use shift properly - the rest have unfounded, unseated, mistimed and forced movements that destroy synchros, drive dogs, shift forks and fry clutches, all unneccesarily. They then then blame the mechanisms or materials for failure instead of seeking true understanding.

    The same often happens with tools, which is why the ham-fisted among us should prove out their tools in the absence of duress just as the weak-wristed should, so that when the tools are needed, they will be present, tolerate both the task and the user, and justify their presence and expense in terms of cost, weight to carry. and bulk.
  5. team ftb

    team ftb Befuddled Adventurer

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    Yes, after owning other MP tools and after working in the garage on multiple bikes for two weeks I was sure the MP tool was up to snuff, changing wheels, forks, working on carbs, etc it worked fine and I thought during those two weeks it would uncover any weakness in the tool. Sadly it was only on the trail when removing a 10mm bolt that the tool then failed on me. Frustrating.

    Hislamer have you updated your toolkit with anything since the beginning of the thread?
  6. hilslamer

    hilslamer 2XRedheadedstepchild

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    Suprisingly, no. With the exception of converting over to a full complement of Klim NacPac and Scramble Pak, it's pretty much the same. It went through years and years of refinement before I posted it up here, so new additions aren't very frequent for me anymore. I never ponied up for the Titanium wrenches, I just do a couple of extra squats at the gym each week...LOL.

    I do wish that SOG built a Titanium version of the parapliers - that's the biggest single chunk of weight on my waist, and it would be nice to buy all the weight loss in one shot.

    I also built a nearly duplicate kit for my Adventure, though, with specialzed stuff for that bike as you would assume, and minus the first aid stuff because I carry that all the time in a backpack I use daily whether I'm riding in to work or not, etc.
  7. Motoriley

    Motoriley Even my posing is virtual

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    I agree with what you are saying. I'm not a big fan of some lightweight tool that is less reliable than the real tool in my garage. When I have a break down in the boonies I need a tool that will work for sure. At home I can jump in the car and head off to the store so a tool failing isn't a big deal. My kit may be a bit on the heavy side but has saved the day many times. I also notice that when a bigger repair has to be done trailside that everyone is quite happy to toss their multitool and use a real ratchet and socket. Since I am the group tool mule my kit isn't moto-specific it it has some redundancy. I just weighed my tool roll and my tire kit and it came in at a whopping 11 lbs total :eek1 so maybe I need to get a grip. :cry

  8. DR. Rock

    DR. Rock Part of the problem

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    Not at all... that's precisely the weight of tools / parts & tire kit I carry for Mobius backcountry travel. Not much less for weekend travel out of NYC (I ditch the DRZ-specific parts like stator / bearings / fork seals)
  9. kpt4321

    kpt4321 Long timer

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    You carry a stator and bearings in the field? :huh

    Keep a spare piston and crankshaft in there just in case? :rofl
  10. DR. Rock

    DR. Rock Part of the problem

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    No piston / crankshaft, :brow but yeah, stator (about the size of a fist), a set of wheel bearings, and one set of fork seals. Front brake and clutch lever, extra clutch and throttle cables zip-tied to the originals, usually a set of brake pads, a few chain links, spark plug, spare carb jets. This is for 2 DRZ's.

    I don't have opportunity to do much preventive maintenance on the bikes, so it's all about field repair. We ride two weeks on the trail at a time, with minimal access to repairs / parts. I don't want ever again to give up 3 or 4 days of riding waiting for a known weak or consumable part to get FedEx'ed to us in the middle of nowhere (or use a tow-strap on the interstate:eek1). If a bearing blows and I have the part, I only need to get to any service station and have it pulled -- I can knock the new one in by myself. Hell, with a camp stove, plug socket, screwdriver and a rock you could even do it trailside. Stator is the achilles heel of the drz, DAMHIK.
  11. CollinsB

    CollinsB Been here awhile

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    My favorite setup here... Organized and tight. Nice job!
  12. cat

    cat Long timer

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    Maybe we should get you to do a thread on the first-aid kit sometime, if you've done a lot of work on it like you have with the toolkit. :)
    So much of what i've seen is more orientated to band-aids for little cuts, not the kind of injuries you might want to attend to in the bike context. Basically, i don't see the type of wound dressings that would be good for bike crash wounds - big enough. I suppose some of the military stuff would be suitable but i haven't seen enough of it to know what to get.
  13. jesusgatos

    jesusgatos fishing with dynamite

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    Think there are already a few good first-aid threads on here. Remember there was no shortage of info out there when I was putting mine together.
  14. _cy_

    _cy_ Long timer

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    lots of thought goes into my tool kits
  15. jesusgatos

    jesusgatos fishing with dynamite

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    but not into your posts? haha. how about sharing something with us then? what'cha got?
  16. beechum1

    beechum1 Grimace Soup

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    Shhh... thinking.
  17. team ftb

    team ftb Befuddled Adventurer

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    I posted earlier about my Motion Pro multi tool failure.

    [​IMG]

    The weakness was the socket driver that is manufactured in multiple pieces then pressed together I'm assuming with some type of adhesive. Those multiple pieces were slipping inside one another and thus providing no torque to the fasteners after two weeks of usage. In other words it did not work for shit.

    [​IMG]

    The driver was spinning where I'm pointing to. i ended up having the Driver welded both above and below what looks like a washer (but is not a washer) and came out with this result.

    [​IMG]

    The difficult part was getting the weld bead to the left of the washer looking piece to not interfere with the Driver mounting into the tool.

    [​IMG]

    Luckily it was all done neat enough and fits snugly thankfully.

    So those with these tools be forewarned that this same issue may crop up with your tool,

    Now that I have had my confidence rattled in this piece i'm not sure that even though its now fixed, that I'll have confidence enough to pack it. Decisions decisions:hmmmmm:scratch. Or do i just keep using my old reliable sliding T-handle, sockets, allen Keys and 4 bit screwdriver that this tool replaced??? A difficult decision as the MP tool packs really small which is quite nice when i'm heading off on a two week offroad ride next week to Laos.
  18. kpt4321

    kpt4321 Long timer

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    I guess we just don't see eye-to-eye on this. I see absolutely no reason why a bike should be neglected so badly that you would need to worry about a wheel bearing failing in the field. Let alone getting one out trailside; do you carry a big hammer and a foot-long punch too? Same with carbs. Unless you need to retune for altitude (I've never bothered for a trip), a clean(ish) and properly setup carb should have no reason to need jets on the road. What about spare floats and needles? Brake pads should last 10,000+ miles on a DRZ under average conditions, not many people will do 10k in a 2 week trip... If you change your pads, do you change the rotors too?

    I'd rather take a day to do my maintenance, than have it take 10 times as long ans be 10 times shittier on the side of the trail.
  19. DirtDabber

    DirtDabber cultural illiterate

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    Wheel bearings "never" just fail anyway......

    http://advrider.com/forums/showpost.php?p=16078184&postcount=26

    [​IMG]
  20. DR. Rock

    DR. Rock Part of the problem

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    Yep. :nod