The Toolkit Thread

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by hilslamer, Sep 2, 2007.

  1. team ftb

    team ftb Befuddled Adventurer

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    Never thought about using open end wrench combo's only, interesting idea and it does cut down on half your wrenches. I would just need to get my head around abandoning the box end side. Not an easy thing for this old dog to give up, haha. Only downside to that is no longer having the ability to double up the wrenches for leverage like in the pictures above. I'll play around with only using open end side of wrenches in the garage and see how I get along.
  2. caljw

    caljw Been here awhile

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    Picked up this driver from Sears today. 7 bucks! Think it will be nice to have the added torque. Packs small too.


    [​IMG]
  3. jesusgatos

    jesusgatos fishing with dynamite

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    Where do you use box-end wrenches that you couldn't get at with a socket? Honest question. And if you need more torque than you can apply with one wrench, it's probably not a job for an open-ended wrench anyway. Again, I would use sockets there. Have applied an amazing amount of torque to that 1/4" Husky driver and haven't managed to break it yet.

    Oh, but I just remembered that I actually do still carry a few open/box-end combo wrenches (7/8/10mm). They're the itty-bitty little ones that Craftsman includes in their eleventy-three tool combo kits to up the tool count. They usually come in a little pouch? Weigh hardly anything and use the 7mm as a spoke wrench, and only use the 8 and 10mm wrenches to adjust my chain, which I can't do with a single 8/10 combo open-ended wrench.
  4. RidingDonkeys

    RidingDonkeys Purveyor of Awesome

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    That's where these come into play and offer a big advantage.

    [​IMG]

    After asking about these a month ago, I added a set to my tool kit. They rock! I try to use my "tool kit" to do maintenance. It keeps me proficient and helps me identify what I need. I used these the other day for major maintenance day and was thoroughly impressed. I didn't find myself reaching for a wrench very often.
  5. markjenn

    markjenn Long timer

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    And honest answer. It happens all the time in bike mechanics - lots of fasteners have the 1/2" of clearance to slip a box-end over the fastener, but do not have the 3" or so clearance required for a socket and rachet.

    - Mark
  6. jesusgatos

    jesusgatos fishing with dynamite

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    Are we talking about general bike mechanics here or working on specific bikes with specific toolkits? This discussion about toolkits and general mechanics is great, but I also think it might be helpful to be a little bit more specific sometimes. I still carry 12/14mm sockets and wrenches, even though I'm riding a KTM, but that's about it. Tend to tailor my toolkit to the bikes I plan on working on, and that's why I was asking. So it would be helpful if you could include that kind of info in your replies. What are you working on and what do you need to carry to make sure you can keep it running? Have found that little 1/4" huskey socket driver will fit just about anywhere. Even works really well for dropping the float bowl if I put a little hex bit in there (would be phillips bit on most bikes). Single 2.5" extension is just long enough that I've been able to access anything/everything I've ever needed to work on.
  7. Fulano

    Fulano Scooter Trash

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    +1:clap




  8. team ftb

    team ftb Befuddled Adventurer

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    Jesusgatos - As I posted earlier, I am a huge proponent of whittiling a toolkit down to its minimum packing bulk and weight and go to decent lengths to due it with my own tool kit. So I appreciate any efforts taken to accomplish this goal, such as what you and your brither are doing. Awesome.

    You ask "Where do you use box-end wrenches that you couldn't get at with a socket"? I dont have a formal list or anything but a couple would be my radiator shrouds are secured by a nut and bolts and need a wrenh for the bolts, fuel petcock, as mentioned earlier chain adjuster bolts, rear brake adjuster, gear shift lever, and valve cover removal etc. . You get the idea. These are all places I have needed to reach on my rides, not just major bike overhaul stuff in the garage Now out of habit I always use the box end if at all posible as I'm always scared of rounding the bolt and nuts. But thats just me and an open end wrench would have no issues with those. Oh forgot the most obvious bolt I use a wrench on is the oil drain bolt, yes a socket would work but I find I can misalign a socket pretty easy (my fault) as they are at a strange angle..

    Regarding additional torque needed as I am getting to grips with stubby wrenches I am using the two wrench method more than with normal wrenches. Kind of hard do without a box end:D.

    Currently bikes I need my tools for are KTM and Yamaha dirt bikes but the tool kit has been used on all makes due to peoples toolkits been lacking or packed too deeply it was quicker to use mine. One of the benefits of the Motion Pro MP tool (once modified) is that it caarries handily in my Camelbak. Jesus maybe my kTM has some different fasteners? On my 06 525 the chain adjuster was 10/13, on my 2011 250 its 10/12 FYI so keep that in mind if getting newer KTM's, also my rear shock bottom bolt is 12.

    One of the reasons I never went with the Husky Ratchet wrench is i was worried the 1/4" drive adapter would conistently fall out of the wrench during usage, changing sockets etc.. Could people with this piece chime in with their experiences to this concern? I've never handled one so clueless and have kept my tried and true stuff but always interested in another option if better than what I currently utilize.
  9. RidingDonkeys

    RidingDonkeys Purveyor of Awesome

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    I haven't used the 1/4 adapter. I'll play with it today and report back.
  10. jesusgatos

    jesusgatos fishing with dynamite

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  11. jesusgatos

    jesusgatos fishing with dynamite

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    Have been using one for about four years now (purchased after reading about it in this thread) and it's still in perfect working order. Use my 'trail' tools to work on my bike, pretty much exclusively, so quite a bit of use. Little thing is deceptively strong. No idea how much torque it can actually hold, but have had to put a rag around the handle before on occasion when I would be cranking on a something so hard the handle (thin blade) would start to hurt my fingers. Can even remember slipping a cheater bar over it once or twice, and would guess that I've put more than 125ft/lbs into it!
  12. mpatch

    mpatch Long timer

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    I usually carry enough tools to work on most anything on my bike but my big dilema is what good are the tools if you need parts to fix something? I have changed my tools to more of a rig it back together to get me somewhere that I can actually repair something. Added jb weld type stuff, bailing wire, zip ties, duct tape, bars leaks, super glue etc. and ditched a lot of wrenches/sockets that are of no use without having replacement parts.
  13. LoneStar

    LoneStar WhoopDeDoofus

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  14. markjenn

    markjenn Long timer

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    I think this is something often overlooked - riders carry enough mechanical tools to do an engine overhaul, but don't carry anything to repair a broken shift level or bungee cord a broken pannier to the bike.

    And about 90% of the problems you have on the road are in two areas: tires and electrical. I've fixed tens of tire problems, and had three ignition switches fail on my or my buddie's bikes over hundreds of thousands of touring miles, but I've never had a serious engine issue of any sort. Never even had to replace a spark plug.

    - Mark
  15. 1Bonehead

    1Bonehead Fearless of Falling

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    This is so true
  16. team ftb

    team ftb Befuddled Adventurer

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    Jesusgatos - Thanks for the feedback on the tool, sounds like you've worked with it awhile. As posted above I was looking for feedback on how it handles the adapter nestling in the ratchet mechanism. Does the adapter constantly pop loose when installing an extension and/or socket on the 1/4" drive adapter? I have visions of fumbling about all the time with the damn adapter coming loose from the ratchet mechanism. It looks like just a friction fit into the ratchet mechanism. Is this true? If so does it come loose often? I have never seen anyone post regarding this concern so maybe its a non issue but I would love some clarification. Thanks.
  17. team ftb

    team ftb Befuddled Adventurer

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    Thank you.
  18. jesusgatos

    jesusgatos fishing with dynamite

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    The 1/4" drive adapter does have a spring-clip that holds the adapter in place, and it's much more of a positive engagement than something like the magnetic hex-bit drivers. Still, it's about 50/50 as far as which pulls apart first (socket/extension or the 1/4" drive adapter). Hasn't been anything more than a minor inconvenience, but would be pretty easy to make that more of a semi-permanent fit if it bothers you.
  19. team ftb

    team ftb Befuddled Adventurer

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    Thanks for the insight JesusGatos, I'll be back in the states next month to stock up on some goods. Gettin some GB stuff:D.
  20. BMW-K

    BMW-K F800GS FTW!

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    The comment about "how to repair a shift lever" etc. is dead on the money. The real types of repairs are the ones where the bike gets kicked over and something breaks...better to not be stranded than to worry about a dropped valve. (because by that point your ride may pretty much be over...)

    I keep a length of wire coat hanger in my bag - it's been used for exhaust bolt replacement, and other "through bolt" replacements on the road where a bolt has rattled free.

    Mini-Vice Grips are a good quick replacement for a broken lever.

    My license plate contains four different bolt sizes and nuts - all sized as replacement bolts on the bike.

    The other key is "KNOW YOUR BIKE". Know what bolts are sacraficial if you need them. If you can pull a rear passenger peg bolt to replace a failed bolt elsewhere on the bike, then do it. (*Assumes no passenger of course...)

    We all know about zip ties, duct tape and epoxy-steel. Why not add 2' of safety wire? A hotmelt glue stick can be worked with a lighter or match. How about a bit of small velcro strap or lightweight cord in case a saddlebag fails or you need a bit more tie-down cord?

    And don't ever forget to stash an emergency credit card somewhere on the bike or person. Worst case scenario in the USA today typically involves a phone call (*Haul Road only partially excepted) and a tow-truck and a flight home...