The Toolkit Thread

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by hilslamer, Sep 2, 2007.

  1. ravenranger

    ravenranger rave

    Joined:
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    +1

    Biggest issues ever encountered in thousands of miles of riding were:

    flat tire (had repair kit and method of inflation to at least get to the next little town)

    rattled out bolts (had zip ties to temporarily re-secure)

    improperly installed shift lever that had flattened the splines on the shifter rod (on a bike that I was considering buying and took out for a test ride out in the boonies solo - did NOT have my usual assortment of tools - no cell service - fortunately I had my multitool with me and was able to make a temporary pin out of a piece of wire that I found discarded by the side of the road)

    busted lever (visegrips to the rescue)

    broken clutch cable (pop-shifting to the rescue - thank god it had an e-button for dealing with stop lights)

    adjusting chain (that one was actually an issue bc I'd just had new tires put on and the "mechanic" that put the rear wheel on MASSIVELY over-torqued the axle nut - ended up hobbling into a little town and had to borrow a torch to get the bugger loose - should have checked it before I left on the trip even though I told the guy to not over-torque - that's what I get for being lazy and not doing the tires myself)

    an interior oil seal blow out (didn't matter what tools I had, it wasn't going anywhere at that point - yeah for extended warranty and towing)
  2. jesusgatos

    jesusgatos fishing with dynamite

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    Awesome. Let me know what you want and I'll set it aside. We're still running pretty small batches of parts and would hate to be out-of-stock.
    This is the direction we need to take this thread. We've covered all the basics, but am sure lots of people still more useful info to share. Like that point bout a coat hanger, and I love the license plate tip.
    Instead of carrying a clutch cable for any specific bike, I carry a long bicycle cable and by using some quicksteelto create a cable-end, can improvised a cable for pretty much anything. I don't even own any bikes with manual clutches anymore, but it takes up hardly any space, and that cable could be used for lots of other things. One of my friends broke the chainstay on his mountainbike once, and used a shifter cable to tie the seatstays to the main frame so he could ride-out. Thought that was really clever.
  3. team ftb

    team ftb Befuddled Adventurer

    Joined:
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    Regarding cables. I logged 585 hours on my last offroad bike through three countries, and who knows how many hours on bikes before. I have yet to ever have a broken cable and the reason I believe is that any cables on the bike are changed every few years out of caution. Same for chains. I have never had a chain issue. Is this because I always use fresh drive chains? Not sure, but they are always replaced once they reach 50% wear just to be cautious as i ride in the outbacks of third world countries. So may I recommend you not try and squeak the last few percentage points of life out of these consumables.

    Here's a few bits I carry in my tool kit to jury rig repairs and get me out of the jungle.

    [​IMG]


    Headlite - For when you break down at dusk and the repair takes awhile

    towstrap - for when all else fails

    Bolts - and nuts and washers that fit the bike not just look the correct size, stored in stiff plastic candy container

    Epoxy steel - for fabbing everything from broken levers, holes in cases, etc

    Spark plug -

    Fuel line

    Fishing line - thick shit for emergency tying off things, lashing logs together for bridges, etc. packs tiny

    Multiple hose clamps nested in duct tape, used before to attach L shaped hex to busted gear shift end for a shift lever.

    Stainless steel wire - good for lashing high temp stuff ie mufflers

    Zip ties - Too many uses, I love em.

    Duct tape - and electrical tape wrapped round my air pump.


    I keep meaning to pack a small (4"-6") hacksaw blade but have not come up with method off carrying it that won't eat into my spares kit.

    One of the best tools for fixing shit has been my 8" adjustable wrench. That tool is the perfect thing for straightening out bent to oblivion rear brake pedals and shift levers, beating shit back into shape etc.

    Another zip ty saving things.

    [​IMG]


    Reattaching rear brake lever to master cylinder when a rock busted things up. This mod held out for the remaining three weeks on this ride.

    The awkward thing is not carrying the shit but understanding how to jury rig things to get you back home. I'd love to hear more on this topic.

    JesusGatos - I'll be needing the bar end handguard bits at least and most likely a Scotts mount.
  4. japako

    japako Been here awhile

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    North Texas
    I like the turn this thread has taken. I only carry as little as possible and the do all material to get me home. It would surprise some riders what it really takes to make a repair.:ear
  5. mpatch

    mpatch Long timer

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    One that I had never thought of was some bars leaks.
    My #1 tool other than basic wrenches and tire spoons is a real full size vice grips (not some cheap knock off)
  6. EduardoMas

    EduardoMas Spartan Overlander

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2005
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    434
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    Fasteners:

    Obviously different trips need different spare sets. Donor screws aside, for long travels I stash M6 and M8 (12”) and a little hacksaw blade (use with visegrip) inside a bicycle tube and cable tie it sealed. 12” spans the width of my bike. They travel with the set of longish tire irons. Cut to length, add a nut and washer and voila, an M6 x 107.53 hex head screw, in the bush :D.

    For shorter trips, alen set screws M6x35, M6x50, M8x(I forget), one each with washers, jam nut and flanged nuts attached. This way you have just about any “bolt length” I need.

    The added benefit of the rod/set screw approach: If threads in aluminum cases are stripped, jam a set screw to use all threads at the bottom, use red loctite and then tighten with a nut instead of biting into precious little aluminum threads.

    When overlanding I carry those little special things like a valve screw and jam nut (XRR), subframe bolts and an M6 tap, often the posse needs something.
  7. markjenn

    markjenn Long timer

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    Like to hear more about this. I've broken a couple clutch cables over the years and have managed to ride the bike clutchless to someplace to get it fixed - no fun in traffic. I try and carry a spare clutch cable now. I don't go so far as I see some though where they carry the spare double-routed alongside the original.

    I've heard of using hose clamps to attach the cable to the lever, but how can you make a cable end out of steel putty?

    - Mark
  8. jesusgatos

    jesusgatos fishing with dynamite

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    Cool. Send me a PM to let me know what you need and I'll set those parts aside for you.

    Handy if you have a leak in the fins or somewhere you can't use epoxy to seal it up. Weighs nothing and takes up hardly any space, especially if you only carry a little bit. I cut down the tube that it comes in (the silver one) and then tape different tubes together to make them easier to carry.

    [​IMG]

    I carry a universal brake cable that has a mountain bike end and a road bike end. That way you can just cut off whatever end you don't need, which might change depending on what kind of cable you're trying to replace (clutch, throttle, etc.). Those cables are usually long enough to get two cables out of one length, so if you're on a long trip, cut it to the length you actually need. Anyway, after you cut off the end that you don't need - run it through the housing, then cut it to the finished length and put a small 180-degree bend/kink/knot/whatever in it. Just want to give the quicksteel something to bite. Roll-up a little ball of quicksteel and mold it around the cable to create a new cable-end.That's all. Stupid-simple.
  9. reenmachine

    reenmachine Rain or Shine

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2011
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    Studio City, CA
    Can someone please expound on tubeless tire repair in the field? Is there another thread on this perhaps?

    Plug kit, fix-a-flat, what? Hand pump, CO2, ???

    In my case, if it matters, this isn't 3rd world outback but more like 50 miles from cell range in the US (for now).
  10. Rotten Ronnie

    Rotten Ronnie Crash

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Brooklin, Ontario, Canada
    I usually pack along a wee air compressor that runs off of my battery
    Slime "Tire Top Off" for $15 dollars CDN at Wally Mart
    Slime Sticky String repair kit (they work on steel belted tires that will shear mushroom plugs)
    Tire Pressure gauge.

    That should do punctures just fine for a tubeless tire.

    Have a look at the aerostitch gear or the BMW kits if you have the money to spend.

    For CO2 you will need about 5 cartridges for a tubeless tire, the hybrid pump/cartridge style would seem to be a good route. For my DR I carry a few CO2 cartridges and a wee bicycle pump along with a spare front tube, patch kit and two 9 inch irons.

    You could consider internal patches for the tubeless tire, but that would mean you would need to add a trailside jack, possibly a bead breaker, and the longer 16" tire irons (3 work best). That's assuming that you would want to remove the rim, break the bead, spoon off the tire, repair the tire, wait for the glue to set up on the internal patch, then spoon it back on and inflate. I figure you'd need some sort of lubricant like wd-40, or tried and true soap and water to get it back onto the rim. Swap out the valve stem caps with the aluminum type that have a valve core removal tool built onto it if you plan on going this route.

    Google search "Stop n Go" for some put together kits. If you just worry about punctures, you can save a ton of weight and keep your kit down to the minimum for North American touring.
  11. jon_l

    jon_l Long timer

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    Duct tape the saw blade to inside of a plastic side-cover or other relatively flat surface.
  12. MasterMarine

    MasterMarine Long timer

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    Or you could tape it to one of your tire irons.
  13. jesusgatos

    jesusgatos fishing with dynamite

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    Cut it to whatever length you want to carry and then use it to slit your wrists if you can't find somewhere to put it.
  14. beechum1

    beechum1 Grimace Soup

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    I just bought one of these tonight. Going to test it out before I pack it. Hopefully it will work though. I'd really like to save a few oz rather than quick drinking beer!!
  15. reenmachine

    reenmachine Rain or Shine

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    Thanks for the advice! I ordered a Stop-n-go motorcycle tubeless patch kit and a Slime mini compressor from amazon and they'll be here Friday. I already own a small manual hand pump for my mountain bikes and I'll probably throw it in there for good measure.
  16. team ftb

    team ftb Befuddled Adventurer

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    Since inside my airbox lid is already occupied with spare levers taping the hacksaw blade to a tire iron wins out. Thanks for shining a light to the obvious.
  17. LoneStar

    LoneStar WhoopDeDoofus

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    :lol3 Anxious to hear your thoughts on it :deal

    Tempted to add one to my "collection"
  18. JAB

    JAB Unsprung Weight

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    I'm sure it's a matter of preference, but I carry a "Sawzall" type blade rather than a regular hack saw blade. A bit more compact and more stiff. YMMV.
  19. Peirre O`Bollox

    Peirre O`Bollox Been here awhile

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    I would suggest using the 45g CO2 cartridges and monster air chuck from genuine innovations http://www.genuineinnovations.com/monster-air-chuck.html as 1 x 45g cartridge should be enough to inflate 1 tyre to a working pressure without having to switch between the smaller 16g carts


    I know its an old school technique but ...........Why not use an existing oversize open end spanner from your tool kit, that fits the majority of bolt heads, and a few pennies or washers to pack out the jaws to fit the slightly smaller bolt heads
  20. beechum1

    beechum1 Grimace Soup

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    I don't understand. seems like you'd have me set the pennies or washers for each 1/6th or 1/3rd turn of the fastener?