The Vulcan 750. Tell me what you know!

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by studad, Dec 6, 2013.

  1. studad

    studad Been here awhile

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    So I'm thinking about getting one. I hear they are pretty good. Seems like a good value cruiser. Anybody know anything about these?
    #1
  2. studad

    studad Been here awhile

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    Oh hell, misspelled the thread title! :huh
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  3. bdonley

    bdonley Been here awhile

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    Maybe not!
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  4. Soulbreeze

    Soulbreeze Adventurer

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    Big girls need love too! :rofl
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  5. bikeridermark

    bikeridermark Long timer

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    JerryH will be along shortly to tell you ALL about the Vulcan! It is by far the greatest motorcycle ever made! :lol3 :lol3
    #5
  6. mr openroad

    mr openroad Target Fixated

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    3 2 1 :lol3
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  7. studad

    studad Been here awhile

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    Don't tell me he's the only person that knows about these bikes!?

    Pretty smooth? Fairly comfortable?

    I'm just kind of tired of all the Harley BS and want something a little cheaper, but definitely not one of those Street 750 POS import turds.
    #7
  8. mrbreeze

    mrbreeze Long timer

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    it's a very nice bike, designed when the Japanese were trying to build better motorcycles, and weren't so concerned about playing "me too".

    hydraulic valves, shaft drive, liquid cooling
    #8
  9. DC2wheels

    DC2wheels Castle Anthrax troll

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    Our best friend on Long Island, N.Y. has had one for years. Bought it used when it was a year or so old.

    He loves it. He and his wife ride two up on it when Cathy and I show up on our K bike.

    He is good for a couple hours but his wife/passenger needs butt breaks every hour.

    His bike has been very trouble free (he knows NOTHING about wrenching)- takes it in for a yearly oil/filter change and he is good to go for the season.

    Only negative- small fuel tank and a bit more thirsty? He will drain his to reserve when my K still has 2 gallons of 5 left.
    #9
  10. JerryH

    JerryH Banned

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    It is a great bike, with a few issues. I have put over 160,000 miles on 2 of them. Both bought brand new. The seat is all day comfortable for me. Go to vn750.com for all the answers.
    #10
  11. Florida Lime

    Florida Lime Long timer

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    :huh

    I'm not a huge fan of the 750 Street for myself, but I find it more than a little ironic that you call the HD a POS import when asking about the Kawasaki 750 Vulcan. :deal
    #11
  12. JerryH

    JerryH Banned

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    Believe it or not, the Vulcan 750 is just as much American made as one of those fake Harleys. From 1986 on, it was made at the Kawasaki factory in Lincoln, Nebraska. Yes, most of the parts were made in Japan. But it appears that most of the POS Harley parts will be made in India. I would rather have Japanese parts over Indian made parts anyday. The "Street" will basically be a Royal Enfield assembled in the U.S. Except that the RE looks better.
    #12
  13. Birdmove

    Birdmove Long timer

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    I've heard great things about them. I'm not a big fan of the looks, but a bike that is super reliable and has a lot going for it can trump appearance.
    #13
  14. BadKarma

    BadKarma Long timer

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    Easy now when you set the hook... :1drink
    #14
  15. ZZ-R Rider

    ZZ-R Rider Captain Fantastic

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    Lets face it, the "disco-era" Japanese Cruisers like the VN750 and it's Yamahog Virago cousin were very good, well-built motorcycles, but in the looks dept. ... well you either love 'em or not so much! LOL!

    Anyhoo, most more current Japanese Cruisers are far better looking IMHO ... and likely just as reliable as their disco-era ancestors ...
    #15
  16. kraven

    kraven Hegelian Scum

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    Here's the biggest defect on the bike, imo: Stator replacement. You have to pull the engine to replace the stator, OR you do it the "easy" way like this guy- http://imageevent.com/radicalrags/kawasakivulcanvn750statorreplacement?n=0

    ^ That's the easy way. :deal

    The vulcan's engine is overly complex and gets easily left behind by modern engines with a traditional inlet and valve configuration, fi, etc.

    The carb removal and replacement isn't a nightmare, but it's a big pain in the arse. If you buy one that's aqing and you don't replace or cream the tank (notorious on 80's jap bikes to age terribly, btw) and get some particles downstream you will be stuck fighting that carburetion.

    And then there's the shaft drive maintenance wherein you tear the rear half of the bike apart at periodic mileage or time intervals and lube/reman the shaft and differential or replace the shaft altogether.
    http://www.vn750.com/forum/showthread.php?t=513

    I'm not a fan.

    There are more reliable and easily serviced bikes at the same price point with similar seating and ergos.

    If you can't afford a bike out of the Vulcan 750's price range, you can't afford to own a Vulcan 750 unless you do all your own work and are ok with the downsides, know what you're getting into, and just like the bike.
    Love goes a long way toward making difficult repairs okay. :deal

    I can rattle off the models of a dozen or so Japanese bikes easier to maintain and familiarly styled in the same price range, just off the top of my head.

    But if you know what you want, go get it. Just go in with open eyes.
    #16
  17. JerryH

    JerryH Banned

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    If you can't do your own work, it is better to stay away from used bikes altogether.

    Yes the Vulcan 750 is overly complicated, it's engine has about twice as many parts as it actually needs. Fortunately most of those parts are very reliable over many miles. My '02 has 85,000 miles on it, and no part of the engine has been apart, other than a clutch replacement. But I take care of and over maintain my bikes.

    Carb removal is actually not that difficult, it's putting them back where the real trouble begins.

    The driveshaft issue is a problem. If it only had to be done when you replaced the tires, it wouldn't be such a big deal. I do mine every 10,000 miles, and my tires last almost 20,000 miles, so you have to do it once in between tire changes.

    I have never had a stator fail, but the way some owners are replacing them is ridiculous. Doing it that way guarantees an engine full of aluminum shavings. That mod actually does work, IF you pull the engine the first time, do the mod (away from the bike) then if the stator fails again, you don't have to pull the engine.

    Despite it's issues, the Vulcan 750 is a good bike. I have bought 2 brand new ones. I wouldn't have bought the second one if I had not liked the first one so well, and I sold it with 80,000 miles on it, so I knew it well.

    Compared to modern cruisers it has several advantages. It has cast wheels with tubeless tires, a centerstand, full instrumentation, it is EXTREMELY comfortable (you can ride it until you are to exhausted to ride anymore, and still not be in pain) and it easily keeps up with freeway traffic. It will cruise at 80 mph all day, and have no problem doing it. It runs a 12 second quarter mile. It handles better than most of today's cruisers. I have heard that the Yamaha V-Star 950 is not a big enough bike to ride cross country on. The Honda Shadow 750 barely has enough power to get out of it's own way.

    The older generation of 750 cruisers, like the Vulcan, the original Shadow, the Suzuki intruder, and the Yamaha Virago, did not have this problem. They were perfectly capable as cross country bikes. They made as much power as many 750cc inline fours. But they did not look or sound like Harleys, and that is what killed them.

    While I am still a member of vn750.com, it is not the forum it used to be. It should be renamed howtodestroyyourvn750.com. Most of the members are busy hacking their bikes up. The "earshave" is the most common mod. It involves removing the entire intake system, and using pod filters on the carbs. Gutting the exhaust system is also popular. Then they start crying about why their bikes won't run right. There is still some good information about maintenance and repairs there though.
    #17
  18. kraven

    kraven Hegelian Scum

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    :lol3:lol3:lol3 I seriously brayed like a mule when I read this. :rofl

    You're a card sometimes, Jerry. :lol3
    #18
  19. Bar None

    Bar None Long timer

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    WTF? Where is DAKEZ when you need him?:nod
    #19
  20. Florida Lime

    Florida Lime Long timer

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    Same thing I wondered when I read his response. :lol3
    #20