The Wife takes on Chlamydia. A South American Retrospective

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by ChrisUK, Mar 6, 2017.

  1. ultrasheen

    ultrasheen Been here awhile

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    97 and 98 are not showing up for me . I'm at home, so it is unlikely a filter that prevents me from seeing it. Perhaps a permission issue?

    I also checked on my cell phone on LTE (not through my standard internet provider) and it doesn't work there either. Sorry I can't be more help.

    In any case, thanks again for doing this.
  2. ChrisUK

    ChrisUK Been here awhile

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    Definitely some seriously wierd stuff going on! I just checked and again the 2 maps at #97 and #98 weren't showing up on a 4th machine (WindowsXP and Firefox) that I'm not logged into in any way. So, I've again messed with the code and now they show on this 4th machine... I'm at a complete loss as to do anything else.

    Is anyone else able to see the maps in post #97/98, or not? Also, 2 images in post #95 were missing in the same way, but I've now re-posted them (The 3rd one of a blue KLR and the penultimate one of the red KLR in front on the no English pirates sign). Are they visible or not? Thanks for any "beta-testing" you can offer!
  3. ChrisUK

    ChrisUK Been here awhile

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    Leaving Ushuaia: The only way now is north. (And some hare brained plan to ride the entire Ruta Cuarenta!)


    After returning to terra firma and reacquiring my land legs, I collected my motorcycle from where it was parked, checked out another hostal when other bikers were hanging out and headed north.



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    My last view of Ushuaia, the End of the World



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    On Tierra del Fuego island, the main highway is still the Ruta 3, that continues up the Atlantic coast to Buenos Aires. On the mainland I searched out the start of the Ruta 40, also bordering the Atlantic, but then heading westwards and northwards along the eastern side of the Andes (Chile/Argentina border) for about 5000km all the way to Bolivia. I had already ridden the northernmost 1500km.



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    Waiting for the ferry to the mainland and Rio Gallegos with some Argentine bikers. Muy very windy!



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    On the ferry: The guy is holding onto his 250 cc so that it doesn't fall over! I'm leaning against mine too so it doesn't rock so much.



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    Stopped back at Guillermo's mum's garage in Rio Gallegos for the night. My German friend Moritz joined me. The last time we met was in Mongolia in 2012 where we crossed the country together. He filmed this now in-famous video... :-) He was heading towards BsAs






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    Searching for the end of the Ruta 40... In the end I reached a fence and a big sign saying private property, so I gave up/assumed it was here. Apparently the official end changes occasionally depending on bureaucrats and street planners changing the road classifications/ naming.



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    This wreck has been on the beach a long time. Since before 1981 (when it was already a wreck, the Argentine airforce used it for target practice prior to the Falklands conflict)



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    Some of these holes aren't rust
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  4. ultrasheen

    ultrasheen Been here awhile

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    I see everything now. Very nice RR. Thanks again!
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  5. ChrisUK

    ChrisUK Been here awhile

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    A side trip into Chile to Puerto Natales and Torres del Paine National Park

    I'm now pretty much following the route I took in 2001, albeit in the reverse direction, so there'll be plenty of opportunity to do a bit of a comparison of then and now. The big difference on the Ruta 40 is that the southern-most 3500km is pretty much all paved and can really be described as boring. The myth and the challenge is well and truly over. Still fun though and in comparison to being stuck in a car shuffling along at 10mph in the roadworks around junction 18 on the M6 motorway between Birmingham and Manchester (England), very memorable.


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    One or two short stretches are still gravel.



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    The rest is paved. And with a guard rail. Here with pink flamingos in the background. A pleasant surprise. I last saw their brethren on the Altiplano in Bolivia.



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    Torres del Paine national park is in Chile and the border crossing was again very straight forward. The customs guy's IT system was down, so he had to issue me with a handwritten document, just like 15 years ago. This is the waterfront at Puerto Natales.



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    This picture from 2016 has a certain similarity to this from 2001...


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    In the foothills of the park



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    A friend suggested it was possible to sneak into the park without paying the steep entry fee. The barrier is often open. Heading towards the gate, a tourist tour van turned out of a side track in front of me, offering the opportunity to ride out of eye-shot from the gate house. Result!



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    The Grey Glacier at a distance



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    Following the main trail through the park



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    Cable-tie storage on the front forks

    Geese in 2001, probably at a similar location to the above image:

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    Being on a budget, it is nice to camp for free (in this case legitimately) on a campsite (with enclosed hilltop cooking area), just outside the park gates (as suggested by Moritz) and with super views.



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    A few more views in the same direction: Sunset



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    (Next) morning cloud, but with a rainbow



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    Visiting hawk


    And some more 2001 memories. See also http://www.thebrightstuff.com/ch19.htm for more "wise words":


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    Nimble kitten



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    This bridge may have seen better days



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    Wild horses and a lot of cloud. But as it's always blowing a gale, the weather changes frequently



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    Genuine off road = no road



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    In 2001 I hiked up to the Towers of Pain, here a the boss of the hacienda checking his painter's handiwork



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    Now I'm totally unfit and with my damaged knee, I would never have made it here. In 2001 it had been raining for a couple of days; Until the day I wanted to leave, when the weather cleared up. So I stayed another day and was greeted by this majestic sight.
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  6. ChrisUK

    ChrisUK Been here awhile

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    Back to Argentina and El Calafate and Perito Moreno glacier

    Leaving the Torres del Paine park, I rode by these 2 gauchos and young gaucha and stopped for a chat. They're very hardy people.


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    Gaucho impressions from 2001:

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    Vegetarians might struggle in Argentina



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    I never got on with Argentina's national institution "mate". I found it too bitter



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    Shepherd



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    Horses and dogs. A gaucho's best friends



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    Back in Argentina



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    The wind never stops



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    What do ageing pop stars and ageing bike travellers do? Another gig in El Calafate in furthest Patagonia!

    For the last 50km heading towards El Calafate, Chlym started running like a dog. At the hostel there were 3 other KLRs: 2 Gen2s and a Gen1. All the guys were super helpful, especially the young Dutch chap with the Gen1. He allowed me to swap component to test for the fault. Every electric component I swapped out made not the slightest bit of difference. Until I tried the chap's fuel tank on my bike. It then ran fine. So I thought it was my dirty/contaminated fuel. Even more checking/testing... and 20 litres of fuel poured into a ditch... The fault was still on my bike! Bollox. It had to be the vacuum fuel tap. With some RTV silicone I turned it into a gravity only fuel tap and the bike ran fine. Turns out it's a known fault! Should have Googled it first, before attacking the bike. Novice error! But 6 hours of d!cking about means I know where all the electronic components can be found and how to remove them, as well as what the carburetor looks like from the inside.



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    The Perito Moreno Glacier in 2016. It chucked it down the whole time I was there.

    From 2001: More action and no rain then...

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    Going


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    Going


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    Going


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    Gone


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    Side on view of another ice "fall"


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    2016: Visitor in the hostel garden. The hostel was utterly full to overflowing because of Ricky's concert. I (sadly) avoided going.
  7. ChrisUK

    ChrisUK Been here awhile

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    A quick video comparing the Ruta 40, then and now.


    A 2001 picture:


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    There's plenty of random dialogue… Worth a watch? I’ve described it as boring. Maybe “anti-climax” is a better description. The northern 1500km is gravel and through some undulating terrain. Now 99% of the southern 3500km is paved, flat, straight. And still windy! Progress can’t stop the wind!
  8. ChrisUK

    ChrisUK Been here awhile

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    El Chaiten and Mount Fitzroy with Cerro Torres: Well worth a revisit, especially if it's not raining

    The rain stopped after leaving El Calafate but the wind was well and truly turned up to near max. In 2001 I travelled to El Chaiten by bus and hitchhiking because the Wife was stuck in Gobernador Gregores with a snapped rear shock and I passed the time around the south west waiting for my friend Dan to fly into Puntas Arenas airport in Chile with my new shock.

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    It's important to park the bike pointing the right way, so that when you dismount, it doesn't blow over. Also leave the bike in first gear that it can't be blown forwards off its stand.



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    Here are Uli and Stephan whom I'd first met in Ushuaia. A pleasant German couple touring the Americas on 2 Yamaha 660 Teneres. Their website is http://www.krad-wanderer.de/ In this picture they're holding onto my bike to stop it getting blown over while I take their picture!



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    Riding in to Mount Fitzroy and Cerro Torres park. Captain Fitzroy was the captain of the Beagle, the ship that Charles Darwin sailed around the world on.



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    Wild camping in the park. The accommodation in El Chaiten was again too expensive and as the weather was good, why not? Last time I passed El Chaiten there was about half a dozen buildings there. Now: several hundred.



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    Puncture. Bollox. Caused by a nail on a rickety wooden bridge. Couldn't get the tyre off the bead, even with a huge SUV driving over it. I hitched the 20 miles with the wheel back to El Chaiten to a gomeria (in Indian this would be a tyre-wallah).



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    2016 view from the wild camp spot close with the final rays of the sun on the peaks.


    In 2001 I got up at before dawn to trek to Mt Fitzroy. Here the sun is just rising behind me, while the moon sets, illuminating the sheer rock face in orange. No filters or photoshop used. Totally au naturel!

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    2016 view above

    Below, in 2001, views from closer as I trekked in...

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    Another 2001 trekking picture:

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    Hitchhikers are nice to chat too. They can also take your picture when you're riding solo :-)



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    What a vista!



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    And another of Chlym, because I like the view so much



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    On the way out, heading back towards the Ruta 40



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    Spotted this fella on his moped at a petrol station. South Korea guy (I think) on a Chinese moped with Colombian licence plate. In order to tour Latin America, who really needs a GS with the entire TT catalog bolted on?
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  9. rattis

    rattis Long timer

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    Your pics bring it back andd continues to ruin my day and piece of mind, thank you.
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  10. ChrisUK

    ChrisUK Been here awhile

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    Sorry for ruining your day :-)
  11. ChrisUK

    ChrisUK Been here awhile

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    Ruta 40 meetings and memories

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    2016: Riding the paved Ruta 40 means that things are going to get cold. So wrap up warm: I wore my down jacket between my body armour and outer jacket. If motorcycles are coming the other way, often there's a wave, but no one stops for a chat, like they did in 2001. Occasionally I spotted a cyclist: Here, a Polish guy who was taking a rest, sitting on the railing. He isn't that fat! It's the wind blowing up the inside of his jacket. A French fella on an old Transalp that's in a much better state than my rat-Transalp (which I used around Central Asia in 2012: http://advrider.com/index.php?threa...-brighty-in-central-asia-and-mongolia.828973/ ) also stops for a chat. A pleasant 10 minutes spent.



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    2016: The gas station at Bajo Caracoles. Everyone leaves stickers. I didn't have any. I must be old-school ;-)



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    2001: The gas station at Bajo Caracoles. I camped here the night in the wind shadow of some buildings



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    2016. The significance of this sign? Not the bullet holes, but this spot is where the shockabsorber on the Wife snapped in 2001. As I've said before, there were no paved roads then. 74km from Gobernador Gregores where I limped to at barely faster than walking pace across the ripio.



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    2001: A BMW R100GS Hardtale, with tyre-lever lashing it together with webbing off my luggage.



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    2001, heading towards Puntas Arenas, maybe 1000 miles away: After arranging for an Ohlins shock to be sent from Holland to England so my friend Dan could bring it with him to Puntas Arenas. Quote from the email:

    "Hope you're looking forward to your trip to Patagonia, Dan. Could you please bring the bike shock that's being sent from Holland to you to Puntas Arenas? I'll meet you at arrivals. PS. I don't have a Plan B!"

    I left the Wife in Gob Greg and became a Scottish hitchiker (there were no buses). The reason for "Scottish" was that I didn't think the locals drivers would know the similarities between the Escocés and the horrid Malvinas-invading Ingles! Got away with it, without mentioning the war, a la Fawlty Towers :-)



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    2001: Having collected the shock from Dan (he was on an organised trek through Torres del Paine), I headed back to GG. Here in the back of a truck with my valuable cargo.



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    2001: Fitted the new amortigador and headed south to Ushuaia



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    2016: A little shocking preview of what was going to happen on Chlym's new (only 3 months old... Virtually all on paved roads) shock in Bariloche, not far up the Ruta 40. I give you: "The Progressive self-dismantling shock"... The only thing worse than a Progressive shock is the Progressive "customer service". Advice: Avoid at all costs!
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  12. ChrisUK

    ChrisUK Been here awhile

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    Cave of Hands (now), Butch Cassidy (then) and regretting not revisiting the Careterra Austral

    As a post script, here's a contrasting image to the gas pump in the previous post, here from 2001. Except the one, note the lack of stickers!:

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    Just north of Bajo Caracoles is a turn-off worth taking. To the "Cave of Hands", that has prehistoric ancient and beautiful artwork painted on the walls of a desert cave.

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    The valley where the cave is situated



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    Hands, prehistoric graffiti



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    More... If you want to read more, click at http://www.atlasobscura.com/places/la-cueva-de-las-manos-cave-of-hands



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    Chubut province



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    I had met and stayed with Ivan in Rio Grande on Tierra del Fuego. Here we bumped into each other again by chance at a petrol station on the Ruta 40. He was touring some of his own Patagonian back yard.



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    Yorick on his big orange bike was riding by when I was fixing another puncture, caused by the tyre-wallah at El Chaiten's shoddy work. Yorick was a great help replacing the tube and we rode together for a couple of days via Gobernador Gregores, Perito Moreno town and to Esquel. Here are our 2 bikes in the hallway at the hostel in Esquel.



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    Riding alone again. So, a Ruta 40 selfie. Nobody really had cell phones in 2001 and certainly not ones with a front facing camera. The scourge of social media. If you can't beat them, join them!



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    In 2001 I visited Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid's cabin in Patagonia. The map is at

    https://www.google.co.uk/maps/place...31af!8m2!3d-42.5113333!4d-71.4310167?hl=en-GB


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    A 2001 splash



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    I really regret not riding the Careterra Austral in Chile on this trip. The paved 40 was such an non event and incredibly un-challenging, that the gravel roads and breath taking terrain on the west parallel road would have been more fun. Here's a great 2001/2 memory of bumping into Chris & Erin from the US, Jason from the UK and Reto & Beat from Switzerland
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  13. rattis

    rattis Long timer

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    Mind you they're paving the Carretera Austral with all speed so that'll be down the drain as well pretty soon.
  14. ChrisUK

    ChrisUK Been here awhile

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    The price of progress :-(
  15. ChrisUK

    ChrisUK Been here awhile

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    Bariloche: The pretty mountain town of great artisan beers, floppy shockers and exploding clutches

    If you've taken a moment to click the link at http://www.thebrightstuff.com/thebigtrip.htm you'll see the maps of my 1999 to 2001 trip. They're actually sections of a tapestry that I saw hanging on the wall in a Panama hotel, with random lines drawn on them. Today I use screenshots from my Garmin GPS mapping software. Around the Millennium I don't remember GPS devices being available to members of the public.



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    The 2001 route, in 2 trips. Between the 2 I flew back to the UK to work a little and take a break from travelling.



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    Sunny 2001 view near San Carlos de Bariloche



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    2001 Horse and guitar carrying gaucho. Unfortunately the focus is a bit soft



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    Always happy to pose...



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    2016: A bit breezy. Even the life guard has gone home



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    An unfortunate acronym?



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    Very pretty downtown Bariloche



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    One way to keep the sun off your head, although a bit difficult to read...



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    Don't know if this is a good or a bad picture. The subject is sharp and you can sense the movement...



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    Still Life: I give you nuts, artisan beer and a marginally un-serviceable clutch basket off a 2005 Gen 1 KLR650.

    After the shock was rebuilt so it wouldn't self-dismantle anymore (there's a picture above), I headed out of town. Or I tried. At a small roundabout, next to a gas station in the middle of town (there are worse places to brake down! ... ), I missed neutral and my clutch lever was loose. Snapped clutch cable, I thought. I've a spare cable, so no problem. A quick inspection said that it was much more serious than that. The mechanic/ Honda dealer who had fixed the shocker was up a very steep hill a couple of miles away. I was wearing full mx gear, so a taxi took the strain and the bike ended on a trailer and was back in the workshop within the hour.



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    Lesson learned: Always buy OEM or a reputable brand like EBC for a bit more money!

    This is what it looked like before removal. Multiple shattered clutch plates and a smashed outer clutch basket! In this case I'll take responsibility... prior to flying to Brazil to pick up the bike I saved myself 10 bucks by buying a set of Walker, Made in New Zealand clutch plates. Big mistakes. There was an odd rattling sound when the clutch lever was pulled the whole time they were in the bike... Parts availability in Chile and Argentina: Verging from non-available to a complete pita to source. I was intending on being a no show for my the return leg of my UK-Brazil-UK air ticket. The plan changed...
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  16. rattis

    rattis Long timer

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    Good luck with that!
    I used to be a BMW is Dog guy but for my South American ride I bought a KTM 990, that basically was and still is flawless, Ok it cost a couple of KLRs.
    I really hate when shit breaks down and Argie , and basically the whole of SA for that matter, is not where you find spare parts in abundance.
    BMW has it down fairly well, but everything costs an arm and a leg.
    Thanks for taking me along down memory lane, I have been perusing the secondhand bike ads in HU and salivating.
  17. ChrisUK

    ChrisUK Been here awhile

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    Getting any parts beyond tyres or chain/sprockets/basic consumables in most place in South America ain't easy. Even these can be a struggle and often way more expensive than in North America or Europe.

    As I had the return leg of an air ticket to use up and buying another Europe/South Am/Europe return ticket not being much more expensive than a South Am to Europe one way, I ordered (and sent to my UK address) a new (used) clutch basket (important: pre and post '97 model clutches are different, Google told me....) and some other stuff and flew home for a quick visit before mule-ing various bike parts through Santiago de Chile airport (cheaper flight and better bus connections to/from Bariloche in Argentina than through Buenos Aires... Everything is more expensive in Argentina!).
  18. WhicheverAnyWayCan

    WhicheverAnyWayCan Deaf Biker

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    Hey Chris! We met at Mexico City when Garry and I went to pick you up so you and Garry could crank up that Tenere that has been sitting in Garry garage for 4 years he was ready to kick it out! You guys got it running while I was working on radiator of my F650GS.

    I just finished reading your RR and got few questions but I have 3 minutes left so I gotta close up now.. I'll inbox you in Facebook.. sorry to hear about your accident and hope you are healing up real good! Look forward to more!
  19. ChrisUK

    ChrisUK Been here awhile

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    Hi Ken
    Great to hear from you. Please do contact me via Facebook with your questions. I'm recovering well after my gravity relate mishap.

    The Yamaha from Mexico City disintegrated its transmission. Turns out it is a known problem for that model/year/batch of chassis numbers, just usually on lower mileages. I was delivering it to San Diego, CA and it ended up in Oaxaca, 300 miles further from its destination than where it started :rofl ! I need to learn how to read a map better :-)
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  20. ChrisUK

    ChrisUK Been here awhile

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    In transit from Bariloche (Argentina), via Mendoza and Foz do Iguazu to Sao Paulo (Brazil) and the flight back to Blighty to pick up bike parts

    No bike pictures in this chapter... But some memories for me, that you might also appreciate.

    I parked the broken bike at the Honda shop in Bariloche and hopped on the bus to a friend's place for a few days.


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    It was plum harvest time, so I helped a little.



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    I have an affinity for black cats, having previously been the co-owner of 2 of them in England (both called Dave!).



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    "Argentina Dave" concentrating on the hunt



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    Not what you'd want to find in your bed...



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    The flight from Mendoza to Puerto Iguazu was the same price as the bus. 3 hours vs 36 hours. No brainer. Had a bit of time to kill at the airport and outside in the car-park were a whole load of classic cars, pre or post some sort of rally?



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    A great way to spend an hour kicking my heals, waiting for my flight.



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    I was heading back to Sao Paulo in Brazil for my flight. A direct connection from Mendoza to Brazil was hugely expensive. So I flew to the Argentinian town of Puerto Iguazu, site of the famous Falls on the border with Brazil and Paraguay. As I was here anyway, I checked the Argentine side of this awesome sight. I had already visited the Brazilian side of the Foz the previous November.



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    Checkin' the bins. If anyone wants to tell me the names of these mammals, birds, turtles and butterflies, please do!



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    Pretty little fella



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    No fear. I was able to stick my camera lens, virtually straight in its face



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    Taking a rest on a rock



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    Likes my old sports shoes...


    Then a night bus to Sao Paulo, catch up with some friends and the long haul back to Blighty.