The XR400 Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Hayduke, Jan 16, 2008.

  1. Stretch67

    Stretch67 Mad Scientist

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    I've never seen footpegs worn to this degree. Pretty impressive I think. I'm replacing them with the cheap steel eBay big-'uns (for my size 14 E's), and keeping the originals to hang in my rogues' gallery.

    I don't even want to think about how stuck the swingarm bolt is. If it were welded to the frame it would probably be easier to remove. Oof.

    There is a fine line of black RTV silicone between the cylinder and cases, indicating a possible piston & rings job in the past. It doesn't smoke, so I'm hip.

    I'm just going through the bike now, tightening and lubing stuff. The brake pedal is all floppy, the rear wheel bearings have a lot of play, etc. Nothing major, just lots of worn consumables. I'll essentially be restoring the bike, save bodywork and appearances. New bearings,cables, brake pads, etc. The muffler has been gutted and is loud as hell... I found a good used one on eBay for a hundred bucks, etc etc etc.

    I've been wanting this bike for a long time, and I do TLC. :wings
  2. Ed@Ford

    Ed@Ford Long timer

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    Stretch 67....when I redid my SA bolt I took off the brake pedal...it is on a shaft with two puny seals to keep out crap...they didn't check yours, replace seals if required, and grease it well on reassembly

    flushing fresh brake fluid thru the 2 systems is always good...especially if you have no service records....it's pretty cheap and easy
  3. G600

    G600 Been here awhile

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    Don´t panic yet, maybe some PO did grease the swingarm bolt at some time. I bought back my 1999 XR4 last year, I did grease the bolt ten years earlier and it was still removable. Was not easy but it still came out. If the ride terrain is not too muddy/wet, rust is less of a problem of course..


    You might have a problem with this one. You can get a new brake pedal of course, but the bushing in the frame is not removable as far as I know. If you find a smart way to tighten up that bushing please let us know..
  4. Stretch67

    Stretch67 Mad Scientist

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    Regarding the brake pedal, I'm sure the hole in the frame is now grossly wallowed-out... even a new pedal would have a sloppy fit. I may just have to drill or ream the hole in the frame, then weld in a sleeve machined to the proper size.

    I'll start work on the swingarm bolt when all the crucial stuff is done. I can just lay the bike on its side in the garage and lay the PB Blaster to it, for weeks if need be. I have an air chisel with blunt drift bits... if I can work the thing back and forth in a sea of penetrating oil, maybe something will come of it. I'm not holding out for an easy job of it though. I don't believe the bike spent much time in the desert, but was in the southeastern USA most of its life... humid summers and frequent mud on the trails, not to mention PO's pressure-washing the bike, blasting water into the bearings and bushings.

    It may take me a while, but I'll get it. I've been in tighter spots than this. :evil
  5. Stretch67

    Stretch67 Mad Scientist

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    Most certainly. It's on my list. Naturally, the front master cylinder cover screws are bunged-up, and will have to be replaced before I can re-install the cover. Fortunately, the brakes work quite well, so I ought not have to rebuild them quite yet, just new pads and a fluid flush.

    Thanks. :freaky
  6. G600

    G600 Been here awhile

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    Ok.

    If the bolt won’t move, try heat before doing anything more drastic.

    I was once working on a stuck swingarm bolt in a 2004 xr4. It had never been out and was truly stuck. The usual big hammer, socket with long extension shaft and rust penetration oil routine did not work.

    So I got a oxygen/acetylene (steel) cutting Torch. If you do the same, DO NOT TOUCH THE LEVER as you don’t want to blast any material away. With a strong flame you can heat the swingarm bolt from end to end, you can blast the flame through the hollow bolt. I did heat the bolt until it was just starting to go read (at the torch end) , and then let it cool down. I repeated this maybe ten times, but eventually the bolt moved.
  7. Stretch67

    Stretch67 Mad Scientist

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    Sweet. I have an oxy-acetylene rig. Thanks for the tip.
  8. DrLewall

    DrLewall The Human GPS

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    do you have a back up tool for just in case? :rofl

    [​IMG]
  9. Stretch67

    Stretch67 Mad Scientist

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    Yep! :D
  10. Ed@Ford

    Ed@Ford Long timer

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    I recently redid my SA bolt. It siezes on the hardened steel sleeves in each side of the swing arm....AND in the two steel bushings pressed into the rear of each crankcase half. I ended up drilling the bolt to get the heads off, then with a lot of frikkin around the engine with the SA will come out of the frame....then I slashed the swing arm up leaving the bolt and the two bushings stuck on....then a die grinder (Dremel or bigger) to split the hardened bushings...they actually break easy....THEN heat the remainder of the bolt and whack it back and forth in the rear of the engine to get it moving. Dr Lewall's discourse on the operation is essentially the bible.

    my opinion is the water that rusts it in place comes thru the gap between the SA and the rear of the crankcase

    It is also my opinion that as long as your swing arm moves smoothly, even though the bolt won't budge....leave it be
  11. DrLewall

    DrLewall The Human GPS

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    :huh

    but probably the best advice yet :clap
  12. Tachedoutoffroad

    Tachedoutoffroad Mr. Parrish

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    My 400 got traded in for a plated 250/300 and a plated 600 :huh:1drink..

    A buddy needs this measurement and I can't help him out... :cry

    [​IMG]


    Can someone measure the length from the center of the pivot bolt to the rear machined end, like in this pic? :freaky
  13. DrLewall

    DrLewall The Human GPS

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    you mean the end of the swing arm itself? BRB with that fer ya..:D

    22 3/4
  14. Tachedoutoffroad

    Tachedoutoffroad Mr. Parrish

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    Thanks! :freaky

    Think he's trying to put a 400 rear end on a 250 to get the rear shock suspension.....


    BTW
    Xr600 is 22 3/4"
    Xr250 is 21 3/4"
    Middle of bolt head to end of arm.


    XR250
    Wheelbase:********************* 55.1”
    Rear Susp Travel************* 10.6”
    Ground Clearance********** 12.4”

    Shock Type: ***************** Kayaba
    Linkage Ratio (est)********** 4.0 > 1
    Stock Spring Rate************ 11.0
    Spring Dimensions********** 61.0 x 55.5 x 190 mm (OD x ID x Length)

    Swingarm Length*********
    Swingarm Bolt***************** 14mm x 213 mm
    SA bushing length*********** 15 x 20 x 64 *(OE #52141-KCZ-000)
    Pivot Works#******************** H-PI-032

    Upper Shock Bolt************ 10mm x 55mm
    Lower Shock Bolt************ 10mm x 55mm
    Upper Rocker Bolt********** 12mm x 90mm
    Lower Link Bolt (to rkr)* 10mm x 74mm
    Lower Link Bolt (to SA)* 10mm x 69mm



    XR400
    Wheelbase:*********************** 56.1”
    Rear Susp Travel************** 11.8”
    Ground Clearance************* 12.2”

    Shock Type: ********************** Showa
    Linkage Ratio (est)
    Stock Spring Rate**************** 9.50
    Spring specs********************** 63.1 x 59.1 x 217 mm (OD x ID x Lengt
    Swingarm Length************
    Swingarm Bolt****** 14mm x 255 mm
    SA bushing length*********** 15 x 20 x 64* (OE #52141-HN1-000)
    Pivot Works#******************** H-PI-032


    Upper Shock Bolt************ 10mm x 55mm
    Lower Shock Bolt************ 10mm x 55mm
    Upper Rocker Bolt********** 12mm x 90mm
    Lower Link Bolt (to rkr)* 10mm x 74mm
    Lower Link Bolt (to SA)* 10mm x 69mm
  15. XR4EVER

    XR4EVER 919 excuses to ride!

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  16. Stretch67

    Stretch67 Mad Scientist

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    Welp, I found a smart way, but not an easy way. Unless you're a Mad Scientist.

    - After removing the pedal from the bike... Ground the weld off the outside surface of the pedal and pressed the worn-out shaft out.

    - Using a MIG welder, ran beads along the shaft itself to increase the diameter.

    - Put the shaft in my lathe and turned it down to the proper diameter, then pressed the shaft back into the pedal and re-welded it back in place. That takes care of the pedal.

    - Drilled out the pedal mounting hole in the frame with a 5/8-inch (.625) bit. Since I was using a hand drill, it wallowed out to .635, but that's okay...

    - Using the lathe again, machined a steel bushing with an inside diameter to allow a proper fit on the pedal shaft, with outside diameter of .637.

    - Smeared the outside of the bushing with red Loc-Tite and pressed it into the frame.



    Tomorrow morning it'll be as good as new. Maybe better... I believe I might seal the ends of the pedal shaft, cross-drill it, and install a grease fitting.


    [​IMG]

    It... is... ALIVE!!!

    Muuuwaaaa-hahahahahahahaha!!!


    [​IMG]
  17. DrLewall

    DrLewall The Human GPS

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    A man who has SKILLZ and machinery at his finger tips! When can I move in, Dad! :D
  18. Stretch67

    Stretch67 Mad Scientist

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    C'mon in, m' brother! [​IMG]



    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    "I love it when a plan comes together!"
  19. Ed@Ford

    Ed@Ford Long timer

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    Stretch67:

    Clever!!
  20. G600

    G600 Been here awhile

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    wow.. Impressive.... but I guess most of us mortals will have our brake pedals flopping on...