The Yamaha Super Tenere XT1200Z Big Thread

Discussion in 'Land of the Rising Sun: ADV Bikes from Japan' started by mr moto, Feb 9, 2008.

  1. japako

    japako Been here awhile

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    Looks like it was a large bump and he may have touched the front brake.
    When the front wheel hit I saw some smoke and then the wheel went to a hard left creating a hard stoppie. Just my two cents.
  2. Happy Snapper

    Happy Snapper GOMOB.

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    My guess is no shock or stuffed shock on the back.. it seems the spring's rebound after compression is uncontrolled!
  3. japako

    japako Been here awhile

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    There is an o ring to hold back any oil. What you are seeing is probably assembly grease that melted and ran down the shaft. I don't think you need to use Yama bound. jmho
  4. wolfmanluggage

    wolfmanluggage Been here awhile

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    Sounds Good
    Thank you
    Woof
    e
  5. RED CAT

    RED CAT Bumpy Backroader

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    +1.
  6. markjenn

    markjenn Long timer

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    It's entirely possible to do an endo like this over a big speed bump if all the events line up:

    1. Soft front suspension with little compression damping and a lot of rebound damping has the bike front end remaining low after hitting the bump.
    2. Rider rises up and forward in seat, perhaps in a belated attempt to cushion for a bump they didn't anticipate, probably pulling on the handlebars to raise themselves.
    3. Rider belatedly gets on front brake after hitting the bump, further lowering front and raising rear.
    4. As rear tire hits bump, the limited rear suspension compresses briefly, then releases its energy hitting the rider in the ass and catapulting him further forward.

    Once you hit the tipping point, you're hosed - you're going end over end. Hope he's Okay.

    - Mark
  7. jaumev

    jaumev Long timer

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    I've made some suspension adjustments and fix a new tire in front (Metzeler Unicross 90/01/21) which is higher than the TKC. Now the ground clearance with the ACD skid plate is nearly 24cm. I measured a new bike with the OEM skid plate and is about 18cm. I’m very please, All this changes improved more than 5cm the ground clearance than stock.
    More than this high could be difficult to me, now I can only just reach the floor. :eek1
    My old GSA with long suspensions was 23 and the KTM 990 is 26.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I'm going to try this Unicross on the front and a Mitas E10 rear. As you can see is nearly identical than a Karoo T.
    Mitas on the left:

    [​IMG]

    I need a hard tire to go to Morocco. TKC's and Karoo's are too soft.
  8. Gundy

    Gundy Been here awhile

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  9. wfopete

    wfopete Suffer Fools; Gladly!

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  10. markjenn

    markjenn Long timer

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    It's probably Okay oil and GL5 rated so I'm sure it will work fine. But we're talking a buck or two savings for each gear oil change vs. the well-regarded and widely-used M1 and Castrol synthetics, so "the KLR guy within" has to be dominant. And a gallon of this stuff would last about 20 oil changes which is about 320K miles at the factory-recommended change intervals.

    - Mark
  11. Gundy

    Gundy Been here awhile

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    Can't argue with you there - just wanted to see if it was ok to use for the first change since I am thinking its a good idea to do a couple extra changes in the first few thousand miles, or if doing stressful riding.
  12. markjenn

    markjenn Long timer

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    Book is to do a 600-mile change, then every 16K. I honestly think this is completely adequate as gear oil doesn't shear down and mostly stays clean. I change mine every-other engine oil change, or about 6K-8K. Several times in the first few thousand seems like total overkill, but if it helps you sleep better at night, go for it. If you're doing these super-short changes, then something like this Walmart stuff might make more sense.

    - Mark
  13. MeefZah

    MeefZah Curmudgeonly

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    How do you extract it from the whale?

    ("Looks like you blew a seal...")
  14. Mikef5000

    Mikef5000 Long timer

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    I changed mine at 500 miles, then every 10,000 after that. At the first 10k change, I pulled the whole final drive and lubed the shaft and splines and everything. I don't plan on doing that again for awhile... maybe around the 50k mile mark. I've been using Napa premium synthetic gear oil, although when I need to re-buy, I'll most likely switch to Amsoil Severe Gear Synthetic Gear Lube.
  15. Mikef5000

    Mikef5000 Long timer

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    [​IMG]+ [​IMG]


    Well, ok, probably more like
    [​IMG]

    :baldy So messed up.
  16. dcstrom

    dcstrom Long timer

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    I changed my drive oil at 600, 1500 and 5000. The oil that came out at 600 and 1500 was grey and yucky looking, at 5000 it was clear. That seems to indicate that it needs more than just the one "early" change before switching to a normal schedule. Since the 5000 mile change I've been changing about every 8000
  17. RED CAT

    RED CAT Bumpy Backroader

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    Is so easy to change I do it every couple thousand klicks. Did in my Beamer too but I was more worried with that bike. Run full synthetic 75W90.
  18. Xdriver

    Xdriver Been here awhile

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    Just picked up a used S10 with a Sargent which i think the previous owner picked up in August. Have to say this seat is killing me. It's hard as a rock. I only ring in at about 155 lbs, so that may have something to do with it. Going to try a BMS seat the previous owner had made up for it today. Hope that's better.
  19. fredz43

    fredz43 Been here awhile

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    Sargent received serveral complaints about the hardness of their original World Sport seat for the S10. Based on that feedback, they revised the foam and did free upgrades for those that bought the original version. You might contact Sargent about that. I really like my second edition Sargent seat.
  20. Thagua

    Thagua Let's go adventuring...

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    Try to upgrade your rear to an 18" ... it makes a different bike together with a 21" front ... but, you will have to use a 140/80/18 and not a wide 150 ...
    Went for a ride up the mountains with a XT660, TTR250 and XR250 ... very hard road
    [​IMG]
    had to rest the bike ...
    [​IMG]

    the friend with the XT660 tried it for a stretch and got very tired ...
    [​IMG]

    I'm replacing my 2 TW200 for a XT660Z Tenere ... easier to pick up ... lol
    Cheers,
    Roberto