The Yamaha Super Tenere XT1200Z Big Thread

Discussion in 'Land of the Rising Sun: ADV Bikes from Japan' started by mr moto, Feb 9, 2008.

  1. towboatcrisco

    towboatcrisco Adventurer

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    Hey thanx GrahamD and Dirty bike!!

    Funny you should mention the nelson rigg as i was just checkin out their gear today online. As for the tent that may end up in my kit a lil farther down the road . I dont have a garage at the moment but im undercover , i go away for periods of time and basically looking for something to protect the bike while it sits at home.

    i also tracked down a " R&G " adventure bike outdoor cover . anybody ever hear about them ?? think it was $ 50 UKpounds

    Appreciate the help and it was an easy way to introduce myself to the inmates
  2. tremor38

    tremor38 Long timer

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    http://www.amazon.com/Speed-Way-MTT-GRY-Large-Touring-Shelter/dp/B009GIXPF4/ref=pd_sim_sbs_auto_4
  3. tremor38

    tremor38 Long timer

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    Hmmm! Gears are turning. I'm definitely looking for a combo volt meter and ice warning. I have something similar in my car that I picked up in the local Autobacs. It has an audible low/high voltage alarm that's always chirping away when the engine is at idle with the headlights on. No way to opt out of this alarm in the settings, so I found a sharp object and gave the speaker a little 'tune-up'...problem solved! :lol3

    I suppose such a thing on a bike wouldn't be much of an issue.
  4. twinrider

    twinrider pass the catnip

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    I've used this model on a few of my bikes now and like it, very accurate. For some reason my Dakar's HID headlight would set off the voltage alarm every time it fired up, a quick "tune-up" fixed that. :evil
  5. Space Traveler

    Space Traveler explorer

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    I am seriously considering to buy Gerbing's clothing to be able to Ride my New flat grey S10 as soon as possible...

    I want to know where you plug your electric clothing on the bike. Do you use the factory power outlet in the dash or you aded one under the seat?

    If you have some pics, that will help for sure.


    Thanks!
  6. TH

    TH There and Here

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    The stock plug will not support the gerbing gear that well. Best thing to do:

    • Run the wire that comes with the controller directly from the battery and run it to under the seat, or
    • Install a fuse block (many different options) and run the gear off of the fuse block, which would be directly connected to the battery.
    I have used the fuse block method, as I don't like to keep my tinkering with the stock electrical wires to a minimum.
  7. Space Traveler

    Space Traveler explorer

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    Great, Thank you!

    It help searching on Google when you know what to look for and use the right words :evil
  8. RideAbout

    RideAbout Mentally Retired

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  9. Bob Herr

    Bob Herr Oilpatch University Graduate

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    Check out the Warm N Safe gear too. They have a remote(wireless) operated controller that does not require wires to the jacket and pants. The only connection you have to fool with is the wire from the battery. Gerbings may have it now too. I just haven't checked their website lately. - Bob
  10. Dirty bike

    Dirty bike Eval Innovations Inc

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    Apr 10, 2011
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    +1 on what TH said. The factory cig outlet is only 3 amps fuse.

    Before you buy, check out Warm and Safe, Powerlet and even Tourmaster to see what meets your needs. I've had a bunch of warranty issues with Tourmaster heated gear, but they have always been fast to deal with and their gear does come with a controller, where as all the others you need to buy the controller separately from the jacket or other piece of heated gear. I've had a Gerbing jacket liner for over ten years and it still works fine, but if I were buying today, I'd probably get W&S for the features and quality of the gear. Wife moved from the Tourmaster to the W&S and is pretty happy, though feels the jacket is not as warm by itself, (w/o power), for walking around. It's far less bulky though, and more comfortable to wear under her gear.

    All heated gear come with a pigtail that is a fused connection with ring terminals on it, for direct connection to the battery. Many riders that already have an aux. fuse block will connect the pigtail to the fuse block instead of direct to the battery. Most of us learned long ago that you can only get so many wires on the battery, and the aux. fuse block makes it a lot easier to manage your electrical farkles.

    I have seen many methods of managing the plugs for heated gear. The simplist is what TH wrote, just run the connector up under the seat, give it a zip tie for strain relief and when you need it, pop the seat and pull the wire up so it sticks out at the front of the seat. The controller will plug in there and hang off your tank bag or jacket.

    When you don't need it, it can just stay there and will be fine, and when things warm up consistently that you don't use it, tuck it back under the seat and it's out of sight.

    The most sanitary method is to use a 'mounted' controller, Warm and Safe being the best out there. (First gear branded Heat-Trollers are made by W&S and warranted the same.) This means you have the controller box under the seat or under the side panel and a remote adjustment knob mounted somewhere convenient for you to reach. You still have a wire from under the seat to plug into, but you are just plugging in the jacket, the controller is always on the bike. You can also use a panel mount co-ax receptacle if you want to avoid the wire coming out from under the seat.

    I use a Heat-Troller for my heated grips too, and have that control knob located in the left switch housing.
    [​IMG]

    Co-ax plug coming out from under the seat, running to controller in pocket of tank bag. I'll update this to a mounted unit soon, probably with a panel mount co-ax jack. (the other cord is for comm to helmet)
    [​IMG]

    Close up under the seat, finger points to the zip tie for strain relief.
    [​IMG]
  11. pluric

    pluric Gimpy Adventurer

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    I have heated grips and a heated vest with the outlets wired in.

    If I'm going cold riding I wear one of these and don't need the vest.
    They are soooooo warm alone. I use it as a snow suit too when playing
    on other winter toys.

    http://www.revzilla.com/product/fir...kw={keyword}&gclid=CPq-5d_71rUCFQxxQgodWDMAaA
  12. fredz43

    fredz43 Been here awhile

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    I believe that you still have to plug the jacket into the power port. The remote portion is only the controller. Or perhaps I misunderstood what you were saying.
  13. Old Git Ray

    Old Git Ray Now retired...YeeHaa

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    You have got to be right. Else its wizardry, not electricity.
  14. Dirty bike

    Dirty bike Eval Innovations Inc

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    Yep, with any of the options, you have a single power cable coming from the bike to the jacket.

    With the portable controller, the controller is in line between the bike and the jacket.

    With the mounted controller, the jacket plugs directly to the power cable, as that runs to the mounted controller and you have to run another cable with the control knob to someplace handy.

    With the 'remote' controller, it's the same as the mounted one, except you don't have to run a wire from the control box to the adjustment knob. The remote portion is just the heat adjustment knob, and you can stick that where ever with some velcro or dual-lock or just put it in your map case or pocket, etc.

    All the remote option saves you is the time it takes to route and install the control knob and led. Well, and the space on a panel or switch housing.
  15. Space Traveler

    Space Traveler explorer

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    Would you mind giving me a link for the one You have???
  16. Bob Herr

    Bob Herr Oilpatch University Graduate

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    Yes, you still have to plug the jacket into the power cord from the battery but there are no wires from the controller to the jacket. W&S told me that is the reason they do not call it a wireless setup because it still has a power cord. FWIW, I prefer the portable controller rather than the one mounted on the bike. I have a couple of bikes and I just clip the controller to my jacket and put a lead from the battery on each bike to plug the jacket in to. With permanet mount you will have to buy additional controllers if you have more than one bike. Finally, if you trade bikes all you have to do is put a new battery harness on the new bike and you are ready to roll. - Bob
  17. TH

    TH There and Here

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    I just went to autozone and bought a fuse block. I velcro'd it by where the tools are located (right side cover).

    However, there are multiple other options available. Do a search of this thread you and you will see some good setups. Likewise, you can also go to www.yamahasupertenere.com where you could also search for solutions.

    Pluric has a nice setup that fits in the cavity under the seat. Mine was just a bit to long to fit in there, so that is why mine is under the right side cover. Pluric has some photo's of his setup on this thread.

    Eastern Beaver is also a popular choice for many folks here too. http://www.easternbeaver.com/

    A good place for outlining the wiring, using a distribution block and relay can be found at Canyon Chasers (This is what I used as a template for my wiring setup). http://canyonchasers.net/shop/generic/relay.php
  18. pluric

    pluric Gimpy Adventurer

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  19. Space Traveler

    Space Traveler explorer

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  20. FMFDOC

    FMFDOC Long timer

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