The Yamaha Super Tenere XT1200Z Big Thread

Discussion in 'Land of the Rising Sun: ADV Bikes from Japan' started by mr moto, Feb 9, 2008.

  1. bouldertag

    bouldertag WannabenarlyADV'rrrr

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    I believe the attitude of Yamaha is this:

    As with the Pianos-Yamaha does not need no stinking high end marketing!

    But I do agree with you farmerscott. I am tired of being pulled aside and people asking me what bike is that? Is that a bullet bike etc...For the love of everything that is holy No!!

    And of course the lists of what bike that it could be goes on from Harleys to scooters.

    Come on Yamaha I am getting a little pressed for time doing your marketing for you.

    oh ya you don't need no stinking marketing.

    High Quality substituted for marketing I don't get it...Could that be whats happening here? Smart economics + time.
    "I really am not being sarcastic. I am really questioning this". No disrespect to anyone.

    boulder
  2. Jim Rowley

    Jim Rowley Rise above

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    What oil or tires do you guys use? :evil

    I decided on my S10 the minute I sat on it. It fit me relatively well.

    A friend and I went to a BMW/Triumph open house. I sat on the Triumph 1200 and the 1200GS but neither really moved me. I have owned plenty of bimmers and even converted a few to be more offroad friendly. Then we went to another dealership and I fell in love with the S10. I had purchased an FJR1300 a couple of months before but felt more comfortable on a dualsport so I kept looking.

    One day I heard an ad on the radio from the Yamaha dealer where I sat on the S10. Yamaha was running a promotion on trading up to a Yamaha. I contacted the dealership and asked what they would give me for my FJR. They declined to deal since they claimed they had 4 of them on the floor already. I called another shop and the owner gave me a deal I couldn't refuse. I was there the next day.

    The S10 is primarily for two-up riding on gravel and forest roads, nothing too gnarly. I have an Africa Twin for one-up duty. You may have heard about the forest fire that consumed my entire property. The first things loaded in my truck were the two bikes. I do have priorities after all.

    So, that was MY path to Yamahadom. But I did own an RD400, YZ125 and an XTZ750 before.
  3. Old Git Ray

    Old Git Ray Now retired...YeeHaa

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    Me too. I sorted it (mostly !) with big 1.5" 'YAMAHA' stickers on the tank.

    I had a couple of cruisers park either side of my bike in Moab a couple of days ago. I had to ask what they were as they were clearly not Harleys. One was a Victory, tiny badge that I did not recognise and the other was a Suzuki. The only 'S' on the bike was a tiny one on the center of the tank and it was 3/4" tall.

    On the other hand a Harley has it written a dozen times on the bike and 2 dozen on the rider. Same with BMW's (inc Twat suits) and KTM's.

    What I really need is a big sticker saying 'I upgraded from a BMW'.

    Edit: Or better still. BMW roundels all over it just to confuse idiots and wind BMW riders up. :nono
  4. Dallara

    Dallara Creaks When Walks...

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    Well, that would be true if it weren't for one minor detail...

    On almost all liquid-cooled engines there is always some method to allow a certain amount of "bypass" to occur somewhere in the area of the water pump. On many cars it is as simple as a bypass hose, but on most motorcycle engines it is some sort of small casting divot or a simple hole across the intake and exhaust side of the pump. On some bikes it is even done at the thermostat housing, but one or the other, it's there (except for some race bikes that have no thermostat).

    Why, you may ask?

    When an engine starts cold, before the thermostat begins to open, if the engine were designed as you describe, coolant would sit stagnant and would not move at all. We know that we want the coolant to stay in the engine block so it will warm up quickly, but some coolant must circulate. If it didn't circulate, and remained completely stagnant, localized areas around the cylinder head would literally boil coolant and create steam pockets, quickly superheating the area and causing metal fatigue and component failure. Incorporating a simple bypass arrangement that allows just a small amount of circulation of coolant within the block before the thermostat opens and allows circulation through the remainder of the system.

    Further, if there was not some sort of bypass the pump would suck the coolant return hose shut, so the bypass acts as a bit of a negative pressure "bleed" to avoid this.

    Don't believe me? Look it up. :beer

    Hope this helps!

    Dallara



    ~
  5. Old Git Ray

    Old Git Ray Now retired...YeeHaa

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    100% agree, besides that if there was no flow at all and the water pump kept turning it would soon destroy itself without some exchange of fluid around the vanes. Similar to a pressure washer being left on with no water throughput. It overheats.
  6. watrboy

    watrboy Been here awhile

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    Word of mouth is the greatest marketing tool out there. Think of the problems and expense that BMW and HD owners have had, but they still claim pride of ownership. I just want an inexpensive bike that is relatively bullet proof, to hell with pride of ownership. Do the job, don't do me.
  7. bouldertag

    bouldertag WannabenarlyADV'rrrr

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    Agreed.
  8. Bill-66

    Bill-66 Hencho in Kansas

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    I was pondering this last nite..the heat has to have somewhere to go..I was sure the efficiency went down..but I was PUI and didn't take time to look it up..
  9. Bill-66

    Bill-66 Hencho in Kansas

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    Well..yeah..:lol3 :1drink :freaky

    All in good fun..
  10. Bill-66

    Bill-66 Hencho in Kansas

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    D..

    after I hit submit..I KNEW this would came up..I started laughing..remembering the days before built in bypass..we used to drill a hole in our thermostats to provide some and assist in burping the system..

    I do not know if there is such a circuit in the Yammie..and if there is..is it enough to allow for a thermostat failure..My KTM doesn't have one..you have a bleed screw (2) instead.. :dunno..


    :lol3 :clap :freaky

    Cheers my friend..
  11. markjenn

    markjenn Long timer

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    This is for a heat pump using refrigerant and electricity to cool a home where condensation is a factor. These changes in efficiency have to do with condensing water out of the air. I doubt this has much to do with a vehicle radiator.

    - Mark
  12. Wreckchecker

    Wreckchecker Ungeneer to broked stuff.

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    Hi Mark -

    That the chart was for a heat pump was why I mentioned the source and said that using the chart was just to get the efficiency idea across. The point was simply that humidity does make a difference in the efficiency of getting rid of engine heat. The thermostat may open a few seconds quicker and once the water temp is above boiling the engine may run a bit warmer. But you'd need to be plotting data to know.

    I think your point (rightly) was really that humidity doesn't make a difference in practical terms for operation, such as "Should I should stop the engine, because it's a humid day?" :lol3
  13. Tim

    Tim Long timer

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    Nope attending the Ténére 30th party in Switzerland :p3rry:ricky:ricky:beer:ricky:beer
  14. GrahamD

    GrahamD Long timer

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    Cool, but don't do :p3rry <--- Too often will you? :ricky
  15. markjenn

    markjenn Long timer

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    The question is whether the efficiency of a liquid-to-air heat exchanger (a radiator) or an solid-to-air heat exchanger (cooling fins on an air-cooled bike) is affected by moisture in the air. I doubt it does, but really don't know for sure. (There is probably some small effect because the specific-heat of water vapor is different than air, but given the small amount of water vapor by mass in a parcel of even saturated air, it shouldn't be much.) Heat pumps are an entirely different deal which work on completely different thermodynamic principles, so sorry, but I don't think they're relevant to the discussion.

    - Mark
  16. markjenn

    markjenn Long timer

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    Sorry, but again, mostly irrelevant. Cooling towers work by evaporative cooling. A vehicle radiator does not. Totally different thermo principles.

    - Mark
  17. GrahamD

    GrahamD Long timer

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    Just my suspicion, but I would have thought that air at a certain temperature with a higher humidity may be able to capture MORE heat than dry air at the the same temp in NON evaporative applications.

    Yep found it. but it's a negligible difference.

    Well in a lab you would see measurable differences it depends on your equipment doesn't it.

    Glad to see all the professors out and about doing peer reviewed science.
    Another thousand posts and we should have the the subject nailed. :lol3

    Anyway, my take at this point is..

    Ride More, Use good oil, Keep the cooling system in top nick, Worry less
  18. snakebitten

    snakebitten Small Town Hick

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    Forecast tomorrow is 95F 90% humidity. 50% rain.

    Now here is my question.
    Will my bike be operating at a higher temp if I get lucky and miss the rain? (90% humidity) Or if I get soaked. (100% humidity?)

    Just messin with ya.
  19. markjenn

    markjenn Long timer

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    Sounds about right. Interesting discussion.

    - Mark
  20. pluric

    pluric Gimpy Adventurer

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    My son was testing the " water bypass" system yesterday. Guess what's on his Christmas wish list? :lol3

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