The Yamaha TW200 Thread...

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by neepuk, Jan 10, 2009.

  1. fazer6

    fazer6 Been here awhile

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    Some time in the '90s I think, but it gained a disk brake.
    #21
  2. Yooper_Bob

    Yooper_Bob Long timer

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    Da UP, eh! (Marquette, MI)
    Yer not too tall....heck, I'm 6'6" and I love ta jump on 'da wifes TW and take it for a run!
    #22
  3. Streamin' E

    Streamin' E Half-assed adventurer

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    We love ours!

    [​IMG]
    #23
  4. Colemanfu

    Colemanfu King of all manfu

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    I got one last Feb for the wife we love it. Great little city bike. Fun to blast around on. It will keep up with traffic but I don't like to run it at 65 for long. No so quick it will throw you off -in fact it's hard to get into trubble on it. I did some mods to make it cooler: taller bars, Baja Designs rear tail, Jimbo shield, short seat , old Vmax pegs........ easy to tinker with as well.

    Check that sight glass for oil and it will run forever.

    Oh yea she has put some miles on it and now we want to get her a street bike.
    #24
  5. Paradox Pete

    Paradox Pete Adventurer

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    Inland Wash. state near Can. border
    I get confused easy so I probably mis-read the posts with nice pix of more- aggressive-than-stock front & rear tires for the T-Dub.

    What I found at Bike Bandit: in stock size/tead pattern (what came on the bike from Yamaha) for the front 130/80 18" there is the Bridgestone C66P TW31, that is a rounded profile "trials-type" (I'de call it....)
    I have "issues" with this tread pattern on the fine sand and flour-like dust of the dirt roads I travel mostly on.
    Stock front tread "skates" sideways across the loose stuff...:eek1. (Front wheel "drifts" spook me when I'me on two wheels.)
    A better pattern for my AO is the Maxxis 6006 130/80 18 (six double-ought six)
    The problem I had was that this tire is listed as a REAR tire.
    It also might be "directional", which would mean you might be better off mounting it on the un-driven front wheel in REVERSE if there is and arrow showing direction of rotation on it.
    I believe the 6006 is called an "Enduro" tread, but it looks like a staggered knobby to me and is noticeably more aggressive thant he stock Bridgestone.

    You can get a similar pattern rear tire, but I'me happy if I'me able to slide the rear and I think that the small motor will perform better if it can spin a bit rather than be hooked-up like a cog railway.
    I had NO trouble with rear traction with the stock tire in the rocks once I had lowered the tire pressure.

    Dunlop makes a similar size and pattern tire (Dunlop 606 ?) to the Maxxis 6006, but I think the Maxxis is a better tire.

    If you can't find the tire and tread you want for your front 18", try listed under REAR tires.

    Paradox Pete
    #25
  6. neepuk

    neepuk Such a drag...

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    Have any of you removed your airbox and replaced it with a pod?
    Any smaller, yet more efficient airboxs available for these bikes?
    How about any typical air box mod pics?
    Are there any common exhaust swaps or aftermarket exhausts that you are particularly fond of?
    Jetting changes?
    Or have you guys just left them stock so far?

    I'm considering tearing in to it a bit but I don't want to ruin my mileage...
    #26
  7. Surfn54

    Surfn54 Adventurer

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    I do not mean to interupt the thread, but I need a question answered regarding my new TW.

    The tw200 comes with a low geared transmission. Most of my research shows that those who want better top end speeds need to go from a stock 50 rear to a 47 tooth and in addition go from a stock 14 front to a 15.
    That is fine, but can anyone explain why not go to a 45 rear or 43 or 41 etc.....as well as a 16 or 17 front? Can anyone explain what happens as you keep going and why the 47/15 seems to be the best improvment?

    Surf
    #27
  8. Surfn54

    Surfn54 Adventurer

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    Neepuk, Since you started the thread.....Would it best to move it under the Sticky: The Bike Specific Index Thread ? This falls at the top of the main page of THUMPERS
    That way we can avoid getting lost?
    Do we need to get permission from Gadget Boy?
    Just wondering

    Surf
    #28
  9. Skippii

    Skippii Milkshakes, my lad.

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    Getting correct chain tension, perhaps?
    #29
  10. Paradox Pete

    Paradox Pete Adventurer

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    Surf,
    RUle-of-thumb seems to be 1 or 1 1/2 mph per rear sprocket tooth.
    If you off-road in rocks and up steep hills you will get so much gear-lash/chain snatch you are going to thin you are goig to knock the bottom end out of yoru T-Dub.
    Also, lugged down gets em' HOT at very low speeds. (NOT "IMO", jsut fact...)

    Gearing taller/faster:
    You've got a close ratio gearbox and if you went ONE tooth larger on your counter-shft there would be a BIG difference. (Also, keep in mind that 1st is about where you would want it to be, even on the street already...Make several "starts" from dead stop in SECOND gear before you radically change your stock ratios.)
    If you have no problems startign in 2nd, take your pocket calculator and figure IF your gearing change is going to put 1st where 2nd is "stock", where will that put 5th?
    If you are very light, like around not over 125 lbs. you can probalby pull taller gear ratios better than a 200 or 250 lb. rider.

    "Given" the small engine, large tires(heavier/harder to turn), close ratio 5 speed, good-but-not-state-of-the-art suspension, if you REALLY "need" more speed don't you think you'de be happier with one of those six speed 225 or 250's (or larger)?

    My old BSA 441 one would do and indicated 90 mph only when I laid flat on the tank and grabbed the fork tube with my left hand to lower wind resistance, and those old Brit. singles were "TRACTORS".
    A small displacement bike being jammed into increasing wind resistance is like going up and increasing gradient, steeper & steeper.
    You just are not going to be able to pull extremely tall ratios like you are talking about unless you are going downhill.

    You will have to split your cases to change counter-shaft sprockets, and your rear hub needs attention since the bolts are "rattle-fit" to the sprocket/hub holes. (Read previous posts....)
    Also, your stock chain and sprockets are not "of the best".
    Personally, I have decided to "get along with" the stock counter-shft sprocket, but have replaced rear sprocket and chain.
    IF speed is paramount to NOT use O-ring chain as there is more drag to it.

    Lots of gearing change info. over on tw200forum.com
    Serioulsy, try THERE for more info. BEFORE you burn some bridges behind you.
    (Probably no higher than 45 tooth rear and stock 14 counter-shaft is practical, and then only for "street". or a 15 tooth counter-shft sprocket and 'stock" 50 tooth rear sprocket.)

    Paradox Pete (aka Old N' Tyred over on tw200forum)
    #30
  11. Surfn54

    Surfn54 Adventurer

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    Pete, Thanks for the help!
    Let me try to reply one at a time here:
    1) I am happy with the TW.....It is what it is.....I have had lots of bikes and yes If you want to go lots faster, then get another bike.
    I just wanted to strike that mysterious improvement balance!
    2) I have already decided to replace the chain, but what did you finally decide on the rear? Also, on the front...Did you keep the front 14 or go to 15?
    3) The TW200Forum is broken. New guys like meself cannot join, so thats why I came over here. (Whoever runs it will not respond to the join approval process)
    I have read every thread possible on this subject ( I think) But its not very consistent and few back up there opinions with any real good explanation. Your response is good and clear.

    Thanks again,

    sURF
    #31
  12. neepuk

    neepuk Such a drag...

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    This is my answer to both of the questions most recently presented.

    Move the thread? Nah, I'm betting that this thread will get enough activity to stay in the top 3 pages of Thumpers for quite some time. These little bike are a hot item and many are still unmodified.
    If you post it, they will read...

    Gearing....
    I've got 2 TW's. One has the stock gearing and the other has the stocker up front and a 45 tooth out back. I like the stock set up better. The stock set-up gives me a better ability to crawl around in first gear and stay on the pegs in the really tight or difficult situations. The 14/45 requires a bit more speed and skill. I don't ride over 65 EVER on my TW and I usually stay under 55...
    In deep sand a first gear take off is easier with the lower stock gearing and once you get through the gears you'll find that the bike has enough power to glide in 4th or 5th where the bike that are geared higher will run out of power in 3rd or 4th. Top speed in deep sand is higher with stock gears than with the 14/45.

    FYI: The TW has one of the widest range of gear ratios around. The ratios between 1st and 5th are greater than most bike range between 1st and 6th. It's not a "close-ratio" gear box.
    #32
  13. dynamos2000

    dynamos2000 is boinking your mom

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    I recently joined but dont like the forum very much. I asked about going to the 47 tooth in back (doing that and leaving the stock front seems best for just commuting and playin in the dirt isn't as high on the priority list as commuting for me).

    Instead of just a yes or no whether I could keep the stock chain and do that, i just got "replace the chain it sucks" and "who knows", etc. instead of just answering the damn question.

    I'll be doin the 47 at some point but 55mph seems like it will be fine as is and after my quick test ride, i need to do something about the lack of braking before I worry about going faster :evil
    #33
  14. Surfn54

    Surfn54 Adventurer

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    Thats the same responses that I read and its very frustrating. So far, everyone has made nice clear responses here. I hope this keeps going!
    Thanks to all!


    sURFs uP!
    #34
  15. neepuk

    neepuk Such a drag...

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    Man, you've got a disc brake up front and you feel you need more braking? Lucky you... Try a SS braided brake line. Lots of us have drum brakes up front too.:eek1 Faster is not an option.
    I would like a little more low-end and mid-range grunt though.
    #35
  16. Paradox Pete

    Paradox Pete Adventurer

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    Surf,
    I went the opposite way from you...Lower gearing with a 58 tooth rear sprocket, DID )-ring chain, stock counter-shaft sprocket. (My bike is the one in "Hacks" under "Yamahamer thread" Nice guy took several pix of my re-built machine.)

    The stock chain DOES suck, but if you are willing to keep adjusting as it stretches, use it for awhile and THEN get a better one.
    My thought was that if the soft counter-shaft sprocket wasn't worn yet, a new chain & sprocket in the back might help it last longer.

    I "think":huh that the stock chain size is an oddball one, and when my current sprockets and chain are worn I will try to get larger "common size" chain and custom sprockets.
    Of course, if the small DID chain holds-up dragging the hack aroudn there won't be much point in going to a larger pitch chan/sprockets.(Remember to check that you don't have sloppy under-size hub/sprocket bolts like I did.)
    #36
  17. neepuk

    neepuk Such a drag...

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    I just changed out the ORIGINAL chain and sprocks on my 1991. The stockers all lasted 11,350 miles! The sprocket teeth look like shark fins and the chain bends sideways almost as well as it bends around the sprockets but it still made it over 11k.

    The chain size is a 428 and the oddball thing about it is that you need 124 links... The standard 120 link chains are too short for stock gearing. If you change to "street" gearing and run a 45 tooth rear you can get away with the 120 link chain.
    #37
  18. dynamos2000

    dynamos2000 is boinking your mom

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    See thats what i'm talkin about! If I can get 5-10k on the stock setup, i can deal with how "horrible" it is lol great post
    #38
  19. tpar1220

    tpar1220 such a pud..

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    i changed to a 15 tooth front sprocket....didn't like it. i suppose if u ride nothing but street, and don't have many steep grades to climb...the 15 would be ok.

    i went back to stock gearing, i take the tw off road a good bit and the 15 just killed it on single track.

    i suppose if u could throw a big bore kit in the tw, then it would take more gearing, the way it is.....the lil tw won't take it. unless u live in il. (no hill in sight), and ride street only. :lol3
    #39
  20. Paradox Pete

    Paradox Pete Adventurer

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    Unfortunately the Maxxis 6006 130/80 - 18 has been disc. by manuf., so I have been informed by Bike Bandit 888-339-3888 in the cancellation of my tire order:cry.

    Still available are the Dunlop 606 size 130/90 - 18 in similar aggressive tread pattern. (Which I now have one order...:D
    Height is 10mm larger with the 606, but this is so little that it will probably not cause any greater problems with the minimal clearance front fender than with stock tire.

    Another possibility is the Metzler 140/80 - 18 (possibly a 130?/80) MCE Karoo, which I am told is not quite as aggressive a pattern as the Dunlop 606, or the late lamented Maxxis 6006.

    Expect to have some confusion in ordering because tires of the right size for a front tire on our T-Dub's are generally listed as a REAR tires.
    (If it IS "directional", run the little arrow BACKWARDS since it was put on to indicate direction of rotation of a DRIVEN(rear) tire.)

    Why a more aggresive tread than stock Bridgestone?
    The stock front tire is designed more for pavement than dirt or gravel and (hopefully!) the more aggressive tread will bite thru loose stuff and grip on sometheing soiid while still performing on pavement fairly well.(I might be on pavement 1 mile in 15 or 20 on dirt/gravel...)

    Rear tires on a mimimally powered bike that are this WIDE, (180/80 - 14), don't need any more aggressive tread than stock Bridgestone, IMO.
    You want to be able to slide a bit (as long as it is on the BACK tire!:D)
    Also, if you "hook-up" your rear off-road in rocks etc. like a cog railway, you are more tended to get gear-lash/chain-snatch that sounds like you are knocking the bottom end out of your engine.
    A little "slip" here is not a bad thing. (Again, IMO)

    Paradox Pete
    #40