theft precautions when trailering bike

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by hotwheels22, May 13, 2017.

  1. hotwheels22

    hotwheels22 Long timer

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    thanks man.

    so just (hopefully) one last question here?

    what was the point of painting it black?

    THANKS
    #21
  2. dirty_sanchez

    dirty_sanchez Dirty_Sanchez

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    Painting the white plastic motion sensors black helps hide them when it's dark outside.
    #22
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  3. Tall Man

    Tall Man Freelancer

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    Be sure that the U-lock doesn't use a legacy key and lock design. Several years back, Kryptonite was forced to initiate a massive recall to replace U-locks, disk locks, etc. that could be defeated with a pen body. All it took was one video on YouTube showing how it was done.

    The motorcycle disk lock that I currently use was one that was sent to me as a replacement for my original unit, per the aforementioned recall.
    #23
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  4. hotwheels22

    hotwheels22 Long timer

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    thanks a LOT. new lock is on the list...
    #24
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  5. the_gr8t_waldo

    the_gr8t_waldo Long timer

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    Go to a good bycycle shop and buy a security cable . pass one side thru the wheel and around the Axel and trailer frame ...if you have enough cable do this a few times. Then lock.
    #25
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  6. hotwheels22

    hotwheels22 Long timer

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    thanks. yeah that is pretty much the plan.

    i'm starting to think this is a lot like hiking in bear country where you don't have to run faster than the bear just your hiking companion...
    #26
  7. DonM

    DonM Do-dah Do-dah

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    I always travel with guys with better bikes on the trailer and never worry. :1drinkPark under a light and often the office will let you park by the office door if space is available. Never an issue so enjoy the trip!
    #27
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  8. ydarg

    ydarg Miscreant

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    It's a small trailer, park it under the hotel portico overnight. I've done that with the bike and the bike + kendon trailer overnight at several hotels now.....just asked the front desk if they'd mind and no one ever has once I asked.

    If it's just the bike, I always ride it and park it under the portico overnight.
    #28
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  9. GreaseMonkey

    GreaseMonkey Preshrunk & Cottony

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    Lots of good advice here. Whenever I hauled stuff on a trailer I covered it with a tarp and used a hundred feet or so of clothesline to tie down the tarp and never had a problem staying at motels, as mentioned you park in a visible spot or outside your door.
    I'd do the same thing nowadays with the addition of a couple battery powered motion lights stuck under the tarp so if there was any poking it would light up, what would be awesome would be to tie in a small alarm siren to it so your trailer not only wails but also lights up.
    #29
  10. broncobowsher

    broncobowsher Long timer

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    Until the hotel manager kicks you out at 1:30 in the morning from the alarm constantly going off as the tarp flaps in the breeze.
    #30
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  11. stucknarut

    stucknarut Uh oh...

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    Dude, nobody is going to steal an R100GS. I've tried and tried. But here's what I'd do if I was worried: put a lock on the trailer hitch to make sure nobody can take it off your car. Sell that trailer and get a drop-gate one, which is way easier to load into and more useful anyway, and then padlock the drop gate up with the round locks you use on storage units. Or install a hinged ramp on this trailer, and padlock it up. Park it under a street light in front of whatever shady motel you pick.
    #31
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  12. trc.rhubarb

    trc.rhubarb ZoomSplat!

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    Save all the money people are spending for you on silliness protecting a bike nobody will steal and if you're worried about it, upgrade your insurance to agreed value and still come out ahead when the bike isn't stolen.
    Don't count of parkinglot video cameras working though... I got hit in a motel parkinglot in Utah. Saw it happen but I was upstairs and it took me a while to get down... they were long gone. I was parked under a camera but turns out it wasn't real! Luckily just minor cosmetic damage and the bike was very adventurized anyhow.
    #32
  13. GreaseMonkey

    GreaseMonkey Preshrunk & Cottony

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    If you're going to make snarky comments it's usually a good idea to make an effort to research the science first to avoid looking like you have no grasp of what you are talking about. Here, I'll spend 20 seconds of time and do a cut and paste of one of the first hits that comes up:

    The "motion sensing" feature on most lights (and security systems) is a passive system that detects infrared energy. These sensors are therefore known as PIR (passive infrared) detectors or pyroelectric sensors. In order to make a sensor that can detect a human being, you need to make the sensor sensitive to the temperature of a human body. Humans, having a skin temperature of about 93 degrees F, radiate infrared energy with a wavelength between 9 and 10 micrometers. Therefore, the sensors are typically sensitive in the range of 8 to 12 micrometers.


    The devices themselves are simple electronic components not unlike a photosensor. The infrared light bumps electrons off a substrate, and these electrons can be detected and amplified into a signal.


    You have probably noticed that your light is sensitive to motion, but not to a person who is standing still. That's because the electronics package attached to the sensor is looking for a fairly rapid change in the amount of infrared energy it is seeing. When a person walks by, the amount of infrared energy in the field of view changes rapidly and is easily detected. You do not want the sensor detecting slower changes, like the sidewalk cooling off at night.


    From here:
    http://home.howstuffworks.com/home-improvement/household-safety/security/question238.htm

    What I find curious is that you can write that and never wonder to yourself "Hey, why don't these things go crazy when it is windy outside?"

    Anyway, I'm done with this thread.
    #33
  14. broncobowsher

    broncobowsher Long timer

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    I'm going off past experience with cheap motion sensors. Since the reference was to Harbor Freight products I don't put a high level on quality. I've watched my share of motion activated lights go nuts on windy days.

    Still going for all this is a waste of time and effort.
    #34
  15. DonM

    DonM Do-dah Do-dah

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    At any rate, point us to a ride report when all is said and done!
    #35