They're out. Finally.

Discussion in 'Airheads' started by caponerd, Apr 20, 2014.

  1. caponerd

    caponerd Kickstart Enthusiast

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    Any accusations that I'm a welder will be denied vehemently.
    I'd been playing around with some 18ga. sheet metal, then decided I could handle putting a bead around the outer steering head races in my R100 frame.
    Forgot to crank the voltage up to max.
    But I got enough stuck on there to loosen them a little, and it stayed put long enough for me to use the lumps to punch the races out.
    Turned out to be a lot easier than I expected. I'd do it again if necessary.

    Attached Files:

    #1
  2. Beater

    Beater The Bavarian Butcher

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    Heh. Turn up the heat, and turn down the wire feed. You got no penetration there.

    GOOD JOB. Looks just like my first 'weld'. :lol3

    :clap
    #2
  3. Twin headlight Ernie

    Twin headlight Ernie Custom fabricated dual sport accessories

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    I have been welding most of my life. The majority of welding I do these days is on bikes and hot rods.
    The way I have done this is to use a fender washer with an OD that drops about halfway into the race. Weld the washer in place. Usually four or five short beads are enough. The heat does most of the work. Put a slide hammer through the hole in the fender washer and a couple of light taps pops it right out.

    2HE
    #3
  4. Kai Ju

    Kai Ju Long timer

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    That ought to go in Tips and Tricks, thanks.
    #4
  5. Bill Harris

    Bill Harris Confirmed Curmudgeon

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    Bingo^2. One of the best solutions I've heard. Especially for the noob welder.

    :)

    --Bill
    #5
  6. Beater

    Beater The Bavarian Butcher

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    SPOT ON. Never thought of that. THANKS!!!


    #6
  7. FrankR80GS

    FrankR80GS Been here awhile

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    Well, bearing races are 100Cr6, that's high carbon steel with 1%Cr. Not the easiest start for beginners.
    #7
  8. SloMo228

    SloMo228 World Class Cheapass

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    That would have been faster than what I did last weekend to get my rear wheel bearing out on my DR350:

    [​IMG]

    If I'd have just done this first thing instead of messing around with a punch trying to drive it out the normal way, I'd have saved myself 45 minutes of frustration.
    #8
  9. supershaft

    supershaft because I can

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    It's easiest just to lay a bead around the race. They fall right out. No need to weld anything to them. The hardness of the race has nothing to do with it.
    #9
  10. r60man

    r60man Long timer

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    I have done it this way. I tack welded a steel nail that I cut to fit about the middle of the race. I then use a long segment of pipe through the top/bottom and drive them right out.

    I have since bought the cycleworks kit and for the money I think it is a lot easier and there is no need to worry about welding the race into the frame like a friend of mine did.
    #10
  11. caponerd

    caponerd Kickstart Enthusiast

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    Great trick. I could manage that, even with my present poor skill level.
    #11
  12. caponerd

    caponerd Kickstart Enthusiast

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    That was my biggest worry. Turned out ok, even on the lower race where my visibility was pretty restricted.
    #12
  13. ME 109

    ME 109 Long timer

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    That's a cheap race frame!
    #13
  14. Wirespokes

    Wirespokes Beemerholics Anonymous

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    How did you remove the lower inner race from the bottom tree?
    #14
  15. RagerToo

    RagerToo vroom vroom

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    What really helped me was doubling up on the reading glasses under the hood. Doggone, I got much better at dat' weldin'.
    #15
  16. ME 109

    ME 109 Long timer

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    Last time I arc welded my races, I was able to pull them out with my fingers.
    A wet rag applied to the weld immediately, will help the race to shrink.
    The washer idea would help with accuracy of weld placement too, although the bottom race could be difficult for the uninitiated to get the washer in place.

    Best help for accuracy with an electrode would be to cut it down to 5" long.

    Tig torch on its own without filler rod would be good too.

    Bottom line, be careful doing this! Unintended damage to the steering head could result. :huh
    #16
  17. RagerToo

    RagerToo vroom vroom

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    Nothing is as satisfying as the clear tinkle of a big fricking race dropping onto the shop floor. And then using the same race(s) as a driver to install the new ones. (Did a low boy trailer brake refurbishment that way.)
    #17