Things Dealers tell Customers

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by ak_diane, Aug 16, 2012.

  1. Bogfarth

    Bogfarth Fridge Magnet Safety Tester

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    Oh they refunded everything and no restock fee was charged. How it happened, though, is a real mystery. Especially with an order that old.
  2. LngRidr

    LngRidr Been here awhile

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  3. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    I bought a new R1200R.

    I picked up the bike before the bags and rack came in.

    Salesman " leave a key and we will key your bags to the bike." I did.

    Bags came in, I was then told "These new locks are different, it can't be done."

    I went home, pulled the locks out and matched them to my original bike key.

    One key fits all locks.

    David
  4. tokyoklahoma

    tokyoklahoma 75%has been 25%wanabe

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    Those guys ROCK!!

    They even let me go in back and rummage around in their shelves to find stuff for my old bike. :clap
  5. Rick G

    Rick G Ranger Rick

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    I had a similar situation happen at a Suzuki, Kawasaki, Ducati dealership (may have even had Triumph too) that also had a large HD dealership next door. Even the non HD shop was heavily into cruisers. Anyway this was around the time that the original DL1000 V-Strom came out. It was during the work day and I was in between appointments (outside sales) so I stopped in to check the V-Strom out. I drove up in a nice late model car and had on business clothes. Conversation went like this, after a salesman finally acknowledged me after I spent 10-15 minutes kicking tires.

    Salesman: Can I help you?

    Me: Sure, thanks. I am thinking of getting a new bike and am interested in the V-Strom and would like to check it out.

    Salesman: (with a dumb founded look on face) Uhh, what's that?

    Me: This is a Suzuki dealership isn't it?

    Salesman: (still looking dumb founded) Yeah....

    Me: Well.....

    Salesman: (a light bulb coming on) Oh yeah. Nah, we ain't got one of those.

    Me: OK, will you be getting one in?

    Salesman: Probably not. We can't sell sport bikes.

    Me: Ok thanks.

    And I turn around and leave. The guy made no attempt to engage me at all in a conversation about motorcycles and I told him I was thinking of a new bike. I am in my late 40's, obviously not poor and looking for a new bike.

    I have spent a life in sales and I am by no means the best sales guy out there, but come on now. How do these guys get jobs selling anything????

    Rick G
  6. rocker59

    rocker59 diplomatico di moto

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    The dealerships don't pay anything. As a result, they get bottom of the barrel "salesmen".
  7. BCKRider

    BCKRider Been here awhile

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    This is about "Dustin" advertising a used 1000 cc sportbike as great for a "new rider" or a "commuter." Well, I think buying used is great advice for all beginners. The bike is likely to topple over more than once. And not everyone enoys riding, even if they don't kill themselves in the learning process. I suspect very few new riders are well-served by getting a sportbike as their first machine, much less one with 1000 cc. A used standard machine with easily controlled accelleration is the ticket to learning to ride - preferably after taking the MSF course, reading the David Hough books, and maybe getting some mentoring.

    It takes time for skills and preferences in motorcycles to develop. The salesman that puts the nOOb on the right first bike may well sell him more in the future. People who start on 1000 cc sportbikes I suspect have very short riding careers; hence, no future sales.
  8. Tinker1980

    Tinker1980 Long timer

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    I was reminded of something a Honda dealer told me today. It was last spring I think, a friend of mine purchased a 2012 Honda Silverwing. For those who don't know, this is a big scooter, 600 cc I think. It's price was north of $10,000. I tried to talk him into, well, damn near anything else including a Yaris instead of buying a $10k scooter for his first motorcycle, but whatever. He and his wife asked me to ride it home, since he had neither endorsement nor time at the MSF. I had to suffer the embarrassment of riding a scooter across Tulsa.

    But that's not the part that made me decide never to buy anything from the Honda/KTM/Can-Am dealer at 21st and Yale. The idiot salesman made that decision for me. I'm not there to buy a bike. I have one. And this asshole is telling me that the Honda Silverwing is something I should buy, it's more versatile than MY bike, etc etc, etc. At this point my pride has been hurt, and worse, he's insulted my wonderful KLR. I end up losing my temper, and asking the clueless salesman if he knew anything about the Kawasaki KLR650. He said he had heard of them. I asked how many Honda Silverwings had been ridden down the Alaska Highway? How many Silverwings have been ridden to Cape Horn from the US? How many sad, pathetic Silverwings have been ridden around the world? HOW MANY SILVERWINGS DO THE MARINES USE??

    Oh that's right, zero on all counts. But the KLR has been used for all that. Seems that the KLR is more versatile. And after riding that sorry scooter, I also know that the KLR is faster, corners better, sounds better, and somehow vibrates less. And I never have to be embarrassed on one. All that for half the price.
  9. pebble35

    pebble35 Long timer

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    I am a salesman (in the UK) and I have seen a Silverwing ridden from the UK to Timbuktu and back :evil
  10. Yossarian™

    Yossarian™ Deputy Cultural Attaché

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    Wow, that must have been one sorry scooter!


    Well, I don't know about that. I'll have to take your word.

    :lol3
  11. DAKEZ

    DAKEZ Long timer

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    :rofl
  12. Tinker1980

    Tinker1980 Long timer

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    Just the one, huh?

    Yossarin, yup it was a pretty sorry machine. Especially for $10k. A rather disappointing effort from Honda I thought. Could have walked into any bike shop with $10,000 and come out with a much better machine.

    Scooters in general seem overpriced. I could buy a Piaggio Mp3 for $8600, or a BMW 650 GS for $7850. Or a Husqvarna TR650 for $7000. Or a DR650 for $6000. A few years ago, a dealer in the area had about a half dozen new 2009 Ex500's they were trying for $3,000 just to be rid of them. So $10k for a scooter is insanity.
  13. Col rides to france

    Col rides to france n00b

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    Tinker,

    it is horses for courses... Here in the UK, and especially London, many people have to commute to work, in a very busy crowded wet city. A scooter will often have more under-seat storage, than a motorbike.

    The ability to have an Italian type rain skirt on the scooter, means someone can ride in street trousers and shoes.

    The Automatic transmission is handy in stop start traffic.

    I agree, it is not a KLR. If the scooter were as useless, as you claim They would never have sold any.

    What about your 'friends' ? did you slag them off too???

    They may go on to purchase one or more motorcycles later on. Each to their own. We should welcome any new 2 wheeled user surely ?

    Ride safe.
  14. pebble35

    pebble35 Long timer

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    Don't think it was a ,scooter vs bike' rant - it was more 'idiot salesman' rant :evil

    A key skill for any sales staff (no matter what you are selling) is to interact with and understand your customer. Listen to what they say and use your brain ! If you go up to someone and say 'can I help' and their response is 'No it's OK - I've only come to collect a bike for Mr A' then there is little point in trying hard to sell them a bike - they are not there to buy a bike - don't waste your time on them whilst ignoring the other customers in the store who may well be ready to buy. All it needs is a short, polite, friendly chat along the lines of 'You never know, you might enjoy the scooter - if you do you know where we are, here's my card' before moving on to the next customer. He may never come back but you never know who he may bump into who might be looking for a bike and wants a recommendation of where to buy ..........

    If you don't know what you are talking about, don't talk about it - you will only end up looking stupid.

    Just my 2p worth from this side of the pond :D:D
  15. TrashCan

    TrashCan Scary Jerry

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    Damn, you are funny in a redneck sort of way.:rofl


    First, a lot of silverwings have made the Alaska trip.
    http://www.alaskabikerun.com/1948.html



    Second, this is where you get even funnier, the scooter will run off and hide from a KLR on top end.:lol3

    [​IMG]
  16. Bacon_Grease

    Bacon_Grease Arrogant Bastard

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    Recently, I bought a new van and hit a LOT of dealerships. They all have the same models and pretty much the same price - just like MC dealerships. I decided on one dealership not because of price or selection, but the salesman. He never claimed to know everything, he answered what he could and sought out the answers he didn't have. He was polite and honest When it came time to write the check, his professionalism earned my business.

    This gentleman also streamlined the purchasing process (all the little details I had mentioned in passing were taken care of before we sat down) and this professionalism earned the dealership a long term customer.
  17. RedShark

    RedShark Long timer

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    Just an aside, - at a christmas party this week ( outdoors, it's warm here) I spied an Mp3 parked up with some other scoots in the driveway and wandered over about the same time the owner was there to get his phone out of his gear.
    "So, how do you like the Piaggio ?" I said...
    "It's awesome ! These are the Ferraris of scooters."
    "Really ? How long have you had it ?"
    "About a year now, I just had the brakes done for $ 400."
    "......?"
    He flipped the ignition on to light it up - 4500 miles. Yeah, let me get right down to the dealer... I spared him my Aprilia 'experience'.
  18. High Country Herb

    High Country Herb Adventure Connoiseur

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    How about a story about how I tried to play a salesperson at my last purchase?

    I didn't want to seem to eager, afraid I might lose my bargaining advantage. I knew exactly what I wanted, though: the Aprilia Dorsoduro. I knew they had a few on the showroom floor, and right where they were, but I walked in and kind of meandered near the first few bikes. When the saleswoman came to help me, I tried to guide her to sell me the bike I wanted by asking for features I knew the Dorsoduro had. At first I was vague, then gradually got more specific. Finally, I was practically asking for bikes beginning with the letter "D" trying to get what I wanted. I wasted the poor lady's time, but she was really heplful. In the end, they weren't that motivated to sell overstock bikes from the previous year, so I didn't even buy the bike that day.

    The lady was smart, though, and took down my name in case a used one came in. Sure enough, about 2 months later they were ready to sell their demo before the mileage got too high. I got it (out the door) for $2,000 less than the sticker price, with full warranty! I made sure to buy from the lady who had been so helpful, so I felt somewhat redeemed. She was a 20-something year old scooter rider, but knew an impressive amount of info about Triumphs, Moto Guzzi, and Aprilia bikes of all sorts. I don't think she (Mandy?) works at Elk Grove Powersports any more, but her boss Matt Berube does. He was a good guy too (and also the FF who wore out my tires commuting on the bike before I bought it!).
  19. ph0rk

    ph0rk Doesn't Care

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    "Oh, I think we have one of those bikes in stock - why don't you come down to the store and we'll take a look?"
  20. dutch440cid

    dutch440cid Degrees Minutes

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    As far as the tires go, competetive motorcycle shops will have tire and mounting choices already priced and the people answering the phone will ask your preference. If you "carry in" tires, You pay a mounting charge per tire. Usually the rear tire is more. Some other factors are, tires and tubes?, Tires on the bike? (highest charge) or did you bring in the wheels and tires?(lower price) or wheels only?(lowest mounting price).
    If you purchase Tires at the dealership they are usually priced on a cost plus a percentage AND a discounted or free installation of the new rubber. A guy who says I don't want your business must have had a bad day and a head injury. :huh