Things Dealers tell Customers

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by ak_diane, Aug 16, 2012.

  1. dwoodward

    dwoodward Long timer

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    aka stuff they shouldn't have ordered, probably don't know how or why they ordered it, and will probably never sell. At best, they got paid up front for it so it's not a loss...
  2. slartidbartfast

    slartidbartfast Love those blue pipes

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    I found air filters for some old CB750 that were a perfect fit on my XS650. The Maxim one looks like it might replace the K+N in the aftermarket airbox on my DR350. Next time I'm in there I'll take the K+N and compare sizes.
  3. rocker59

    rocker59 diplomatico di moto

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    Yes. It is.
  4. squonker

    squonker Eat my shorts

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    End of thread right there!
  5. RFVC600R

    RFVC600R SAND EATER!

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    Sorry to revive this thread an' all. But I just want to post this and don't wanna make a new thread for something like this.

    Went to the Honda dealership, surely they have my oil filter.

    Ask the man at the service desk about it, he said "For an '83? we would have to order it, we don't carry anything that old." looking at me like WTF you on something that old for?

    Me "I bet you got an oil filter for let's say... IDK.... let's say a 2004 XR650L?"

    Him "Lemme see..... Yes we have 13 in stock."

    :rofl For some reason, It made my day. Next time I'll just give him the part number(s) for what ever I'm needing, No need to tell them the model, they're morons.
  6. ttpete

    ttpete Rectum Non Bustibus

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    Surprisingly, I recently ordered and got a set of OEM mirrors for an '83 XL. I owned one years ago and I liked the mirrors so well that I wanted a set for my KLR.
  7. HooliKen

    HooliKen Awesome is a flavor

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    And from the "Some Dealers Get It" File:

    The KTM 950 recently developed a coolant leak.

    Brought up my parts PDF and got all part numbers together and hit a couple of the usuals (KTM-Twins/Parts/Hutt) to check prices.

    Jump on the local Green Bay KTM dealers website and pull up all the parts on their system. Prices were in the ballpark so figured I would give them a call to see if anything was in stock:

    Me: Need some engine parts for and LC-8.

    KTM Dude: LC-8? Probably have to order them but if you order in next 45 minutes or so I can have them Friday and get them shipped right to you.

    Me: I am in Algoma and no worries about picking them up. Would it be easier to email you the part numbers instead of over the phone.

    KTM Dude: Oh your local? No, easiest thing to do is order them on the website. Will get them here for you by Friday (no shipping cost) and if you order on our site we will give you a discount.

    Me: Right On.

    Prices were the same, if not better, than the usual online places and saved at least $15 in shipping.

    There are still awesome dealers out there that understand how most of us are doing business nowadays.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------

    On the flip side of that. After I got ejected from, and totaled the Buell, I was shopping for a KTM, either Adventure or SE.

    Living in VA at the time so call the local dealer and ask what they have in stock. Had a left over 2006 Adventure they would make me a good deal on. Sweet! Told them I would be in on Saturday to check it out and take it for a spin, this was a Monday when I called. Dude said OK and figured all was well.

    Showed up at the dealer Saturday and asked about the 06 Adventure. Guy just kind of looks at me funny, obviously not the same guy I talked to on the phone. He takes me around corner and there the NEW, left over bike, sits in the hallway in a severe state of disassembly. With the carbs dangling from the handlebars by a bungy cord. Needless to say I was not impressed. Laughed, shook me head, and said later.
  8. joenuclear

    joenuclear Planning.....

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    I don't like stealerships anymore than the next guy but.... dealers are charged tax on their inventory now. Nobody wants to stock parts anymore.

    I'm lucky to live in NW Arkansas. The BMW dealership is owned by the sales guy and the service guy. The parts gal has been in the moto business for years.

    I've got an independent with a $35 hr shop rate and a work ethic named Mossy Creek Cycle. I have to ride a little out of the way and down a mile and a half of gravel and I never mind it because I've never been bullshited or lied to.

    There's a larger independent closer to me that has a higher shop rate and sometimes a day or two wait that l use as a back-up.

    The local Asian dealers don't have any inventory and too high a mark up.
  9. DAKEZ

    DAKEZ Long timer

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    "Ride Fast and Take Chances" :1drink


    The Rev.
  10. klaviator

    klaviator Long timer

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    A recent dealer experience.

    I was on an extended trip when I noticed my rear tire was wearing much faster than expected. I decided to get a new tire ASAP before I really got into the boonies. So I'm looking for a tire on a Monday morning. There was no dealer in Marion, VA where I spent the night. Surprisingly, most of the dealers in nearby towns where open on Monday. The first place I called, a four Japanese brand shop, had a tire in the correct size. Great! But they wouldn't install it on my Aprilia since it was not a brand they sold:huh

    The next place I called was a small Victory/Polaris shop. They also a a tire that would fit. Would they mount it on Aprilia? They said "No problem. We've got one bike ahead of you if you can come in at 10 we'll get you in." So I got there at 10 and rode out at 11 with a new tire.

    As some others have posted, I usually have better experiences at smaller dealers. Yes they did charge me retail for the tire and $45 for mount and balance but it was worth it to me to be able to continue my trip with minimum delay.
  11. slide

    slide A nation in despair

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    I had a similar experience. In my case, the dealer wouldn't install the tire on a bike which wasn't his brand even though I offered to take the wheel off.

    Gee, a wheel is a wheel. I can't believe that a Brand X wheel is so different from the Brand Y one that the dealer was at risk to install the tire.
  12. Joe3

    Joe3 Been here awhile

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    On trip I tipped the bike over in the hotel parking lot and broke the end off of my clutch lever. Lever was usable but didn't feel right. I stopped at a a dealer in Knoxville, TN the next day. The parts guy didn't have a lever in stock so he went into the showroom to find a new bike he could take a lever off of so I could continue my trip in comfort. I was very impressed. :clap
  13. stiles

    stiles Adventurer

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    A few notes from the other side of the counter:

    Tires are, in fact, volume priced over multiple tiers - and the price difference is huge between buying one and buying 700 of them at once. Open any big distributor's catalog (Tucker Rocky, Parts Unlimited) and the standard dealer cost of any popular tire in there will be more than the selling price from the big tire mail order websites.

    That said, full retail price as listed in those catalogs is essentially a myth, especially for popular sizes and brands. If you want to sell any tires at all, you need to discount them at least somewhat. I have run three euro multiline dealership service departments so far in major markets, and set pricing for tires and installation. Those were midsized shops - 3 techs.

    All were smaller volume dealers, selling maybe 3,000 tires a year tops. That sounds like a lot until you consider the big mail order outfits sell that many in a week during season. The reason dealers don't want to mail order tires themselves is that the total dollar volume of their aftermarket sales is counted for setting pricing for all parts from those big nationwide distributors - the more you buy, the better your margin. Also, adding duplicate part numbers with different costs from different suppliers is a headache in Lightspeed, the dealer admin computer program used to do everything from repair orders to parts sales, accounts receivable, bike sales and inventory. The staff time spent ordering/labeling/receiving/editing info in lightspeed/issuing a separate payment outside of normal channels is time that could be better spent on a million other things, like helping customers at the counter, dispatching parts to service dept or handling your own mail order/internet sales.

    I did as much pre-season volume ordering as possible, took advantage of volume deals from the manufacturer when I could, cut tire pricing as much as I could (down to 15% over my cost, typically) and preserved my install labor rate as best as possible. I also didn't charge more labor for installing mail order tires. Customers who brought in the wheel off the bike got a cheaper price on labor, as they should, so I could offer a lower cost option for buyers comfortable with doing their own R&R.

    As parts go, like everything else, dealers stock what sells. A good parts manager will track monthly sales and lost sales (requested but not in stock and not sold when the customer leaves without ordering) of any given part number through Lightspeed, and look at sales history, particularly when the last one sold. A $200 part sitting on the shelf for two years ties up that capital and makes you nothing (actually costs you money, in fact, since it takes up space you're paying for, required inventorying,stocking, receiving, ordering, etc.) while that same $200 spent on a popular open clutch cover that you sell every month with a 25% margin makes you $1200 in gross profit on $4800 in gross sales over the same two years. Add in a state inventory tax and the much stiffer requirements/higher interest rates to get a working capital loan or bank line of credit and you have dealer owners taking a much harder line on stocking inventory dollar limits. Also remember that tires, like fresh produce, age out. Throwing away a new, unused 5 year old $200 tire that has tied up your working capital while sitting on a shelf for 4 years without making you a penny is something nobody wants to explain to your general manager.

    This is the other reason why your tire may not be in stock, especially if it is an off size or specialty model that only fits your bike; even more so if that bike wasn't a big seller where that dealership is. All things being equal, if you haven't sold one of those parts in the last 12 months or so they are not worth keeping in stock. This is also the big reason why special ordered parts must be paid for in advance.Dealers are often hit with a 20%+ restocking fee plus return shipping if they need to return special ordered parts, and special ordered electrical parts simply aren't returnable to most manufacturers.

    Also note that there may be other forces at work for parts pricing - one manufacturer gives better hard parts prices to dealers that sell a lot of apparel under a specific program.
  14. Ianstein

    Ianstein Been here awhile

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    Dealerships are the reason I learned to work on my own cars/bikes/sleds and do my own research for parts. After working as a mechanic and knowing the amount of markup I just can't bring myself to pay all the extras without at least trying to find a cheaper way first.

    The local big powersports dealer is kind of shady. Its not like they'll try to cheat you, but they sure won't go out of their way to help you. Sales guys are high pressure, don't give you the full story on their inventory (probably because they don't know anything other than specs on the newest models). The parts guys are always uncaring. They'll help you, but they never act like they're enjoying it. I've never had a real problem with them, but I think that's because I know what to expect.


    Now my local Skidoo/Bombardier dealer is bad ass. Just a little family owned place. Great customer service, knowledgable and friendly. They even host a couple open houses in the fall that they let me try to sell my old sled and let me post for sale fliers in the building. I was really surprised when I went in there last August to talk about buying a 2012 sled. Things came up and I didn't back in to talk to them again until October and the sales guy remembered my name and exactly what sled I had been looking at before. I was also surprised for being such a small dealer, their parts still came in at the same cost as buying online if I took shipping into account. I always try to buy local if the price difference is the same or smallish.
  15. HooliKen

    HooliKen Awesome is a flavor

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    Thanks for posting up man. Nice to hear both sides of the story.

    Never had issues with the tire thing personally, but know many others that have, or claim to have.
  16. Human Ills

    Human Ills Useful Idiom

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    If I ran that restaurant, I wouldn't tell them that I didn't want to sell them my food ever, either.

    I DON'T WANT YOUR BUSINESS.

    That expression should be saved for people who come in and cause trouble.
  17. Tuna Helper

    Tuna Helper Rawrr!

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    Things dealers tell customers...

    "Well that bike needs the handlebars tightened up, but we can do that before you come back."

    Two days later I come back...

    "We haven't got to it yet, we weren't expecting you until 1:30"

    I never told them when I'd be there.

    "We'll work it in for you."

    "It's going to be about an hour and a half. If you want to leave we'll call you."

    I leave. About three hours later I get the call.

    "The handlebar clamp on that is wallered out, so we have to replace it. Unfortunately we don't have one in stock, so it'll be a few days to a week."

    Really? As long as I have it by Monday.

    No word all weekend, so I call on Monday.

    "The part came in today, so we'll get right on it and let you know."

    My relief was short lived.

    "The service manager something something and that part actually goes to a different bike. they don't put the bike model on the box, just the designation. Yours will be h3ere either later today or tomorrow"

    Fuck fuckity fuck!

    About 20 minutes later I get a text, that someone checked and my parts will be tomorrow.

    Now it's tomorrow, and no call. I call them about 5:15, no answer from the sales manager/finance guy that I've been talking to. I think that number rings at his desk.

    At 5:30 I get a call, the bike is off the rack, but it is too late for me to come out. Now I have to either wait two days for another day off or take a vacation day to go pick it up.

    Why didn't I just cruise craigslist?
  18. jpgrego

    jpgrego Adventurer

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    SC
    When I bought my Buell, I was really surprised what a great price they were willing to agree to. I had seen the bike on their showroom floor for quite awhile so I figured they just wanted it off the books and were willing to deal.....

    Six months later when it came time to replace the first set of tires I wanted to give them my business even though it's a bit farther from my house than I wanted to go. I had scheduled my time slot in advance and had a friend follow me so I didn't have to sit around the shop and wait. When I arrived I was told that they weren't carrying Buell anymore and as a result they wouldn't work on them either.... The fact I bought the bike there only months earlier didn't matter, they weren't going to touch it..... :eek1
  19. slide

    slide A nation in despair

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    Harley really screwed Buell over. I shopped a Uly against the Tiger years ago. I went to the HD dealer to look at one & the guy greeted me warmly but when I said I wanted to check out the Uly, he acted as if I was the plague.

    He took me in the back - the hallway leading to the service area - and showed me a partly assembled Uly. He wouldn't even put it on the floor with the Holy Harleys. I decided that no way would I buy a bike - no matter how interesting - if I had to deal with these fools for parts, etc.

    So I bought the Tiger & am happy.
  20. Tome

    Tome Been here awhile

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    I have a lot of time for good dealers, especially with new bikes under warranty :evil
    I have found myself wondering about the service and/or parts dept on more than one occasion with 'information' they've given me but I have to remind myself (having been a parts person at one point) that home/forum/OTR fixes are NOT what an official dealer is about. They have procedures and official ways of doing things because of liability, etc. A number of dealers won't adjust suspension away from 'the book' incase you bin it 2 miles down the road and blame the suspension settings they gave you and I can totally see their point in this day an age.