This is why you put Anti-Seize on your spark plugs!

Discussion in 'Airheads' started by Ron Seida, Jan 18, 2013.

  1. Ron Seida

    Ron Seida Adventman

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    Listen up kids! Always put Anti-Seize, or any other high temperature non-seizing compound on your sparkplugs so you can avoid the three hours of nervousness i endured today removing a seized sparkplug from a /2 cylinder head. In the end i prevailed... Boo-Yah! :norton
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    #1
  2. Steve G.

    Steve G. Long timer

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    Agree totally. Very much overlooked, more so in the automotive area where cars run for years on 1 set of plugs, most with aluminium heads.
    Copper never seize is better imo, not aluminium.
    #2
  3. bmwhacker

    bmwhacker Still on 3 wheels

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    Ya good point. I'm gonna do it.
    I had a "rough" feel removing one R100S plug yesterday. Threads looked ok though.
    I'll follow up with some anti sieze tomorrow!:D
    #3
  4. Ron Seida

    Ron Seida Adventman

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    This one was pretty scary! The metal insert is only pressed into the head. The moment it broke loose, i wasn't sure if i was spinning the plug, or the insert out of the aluminum. i soaked it with liquid wrench for 4 days and it did nothing, drilling out the spark plug was the only option. These heads are in really good shape, i feel very fortunate i got the plug out and didn't screw it up!
    #4
  5. boxerboy81

    boxerboy81 Stay Horizontal

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    Copper verses the silver stuff..

    Which is the best application for each of these on our bikes? If I had to have one, I'd buy the copper stuff for the exhaust nuts and sparks plugs, but does the silver stuff have a specific use?
    #5
  6. ritetwist

    ritetwist Been here awhile

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    Without mentioning brand names, the kopr-kote I have says rated to 1500 deg.F,,contains copper and graphite.
    The never-seez (silver) is rated to 2400 deg.F.,contains nickel, graphite,and aluminum.Both contain other petroleum
    additives, etc. Both meet a military spec MIL-PRF-907E,For what its worth.
    Use whatever makes you feel good.
    I believe in using something,not too much.
    #6
  7. Paul_Rochdale

    Paul_Rochdale Been here awhile

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    Surely this is what EVERYBODY does? No? 45yrs tinkering with bikes and I've done it since day one. And I didn't need to know what bloomin' Military Spec it was.
    #7
  8. ME 109

    ME 109 Long timer

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    Anti-seize?

    I use natural airhead technique..
    It's never together long enough for anything to seize.:wink:
    #8
  9. chollo9

    chollo9 Screwed the Pooch

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    Ya, a schmeer of oil on the threads, they will be out again soon enough.
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  10. JonnyCash

    JonnyCash turd polisher

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    ^seriously, I must have mine out 2 or 3 times a season. I don't use a torque wrench, but I am very light handed when tightening them up. I only put never-seize on stuff that's going to stay together for a long time, or highly seize-prone things like exhaust header nuts.
    #10
  11. Bill Harris

    Bill Harris Confirmed Curmudgeon

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    I've used the Loctite nickel-based Anti-Sieze since Istarted working on VWs in the 1960s.

    One problem with aluminum heads is over-tightening. Use a light touch or a torque wrench. If the plug goes in with resistance, run a sparkplug thread chaser into it-- carbon can sometimes build up on the threads.

    On some years of the /2 series there was a problem with the aluminum alloy being too soft and strip-prone. Called "butterheads". I disremember which year(s); I think Vech (Benchmarkworks) has something at his website.

    --Bill
    #11
  12. Airhead Wrangler

    Airhead Wrangler Long timer

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    I don't think they make aluminum anti-seize, do they? The silver stuff you're probably thinking of is nickel anti-seize. Regardless, you're right, copper is better in hot applications like this.
    #12
  13. danedg

    danedg Horizontally Opposed

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    If the heat of any part of a /2 exceeds 275F you're in deep doodoo. I'd not be too worried about 1400 vs. 2400 heat resistance. I don't think my plugs have been in the bike longer than a month without being checked for something or another. And they get changed just about every year....
    You DO change your spark plugs often, DON'T YOU????????:deal
    #13
  14. Multiplicity

    Multiplicity Been here awhile

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    Exactly :thumbup
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  15. Multiplicity

    Multiplicity Been here awhile

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    No! If it's not a 2 stroke. Today's spark plug technology is far superior to the old copper core of yesteryear.

    Platinum, Double Platinum and Iridium plugs will run for much longer and don't require frequent replacement :norton

    They also don't require as much coil saturation to get a higher KV discharge from the ignition system Today's technology has made many great changes and advancements.
    The biggest benefit is better MPG and less maintenance costs.
    Good high quality plugs cost more, but they run much longer. Denso plugs are marine grade. They're also coated, but I still use copper anti-seize on all spark plugs, wheel bolts and
    anywhere dissimilar metals are used or has the ability to corrode from the elements.
    #15
  16. Ron Seida

    Ron Seida Adventman

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    Ive used both copper and silver/nickel with similar effects. I really don't think their temperature ratings really apply to us as they're both rated well beyond their expected duty in our case. These heads were dug out of a pile of parts, im really glad the previous owner didn't try to forcefully remove those plugs.
    While were on the subject of cylinder heads, heres a question for you ole' timers. At what point did BMW put larger steel inserts in their heads? One of the heads in my possession has larger holes than i was expecting. [​IMG][​IMG]
    #16
  17. chollo9

    chollo9 Screwed the Pooch

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    Very true. Even a quality (Bosch, NGK, ND, . . .) base level "fat" core plug will last a long time in these engines assuming all else is well. It's not a race bike.
    #17
  18. danedg

    danedg Horizontally Opposed

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    Platinum, Double Platinum and Iridium plugs will run for much longer and don't require frequent replacement.

    Only problem is, these plugs won't work well in a slash 2. They're not 0 resistance. That leaves the Bosch and NGK that still utilize the Old Technology.
    I like the idea of some slippery stuff on the threads.
    #18
  19. Big Bamboo

    Big Bamboo Aircooled & Sunbaked

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  20. motu

    motu Loose Pre Unit

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    I used to use Wurth AL1100, but it's a bit expensive for me these days, so just use a copper antisieze.

    http://www.wurth.co.uk/product/al1100
    #20