Thoughts on a 65 Mustang Fastback

Discussion in 'Shiny Things' started by TEXASYETI, Jul 6, 2013.

  1. TEXASYETI

    TEXASYETI Call me "thread killer!"

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    Been looking for awhile so this is not a complete impulse buy. I do think it is a solid car but just wondered what others might think. The buyer says he is firm and I am going to see the car Tuesday.

    Here are the particulars:

    1965 mustand fastback 2+2
    289 2-barrel
    3 speed auto

    1 owner car from california but been in new mexico the last ten years

    restored 20 years ago so it has fair paint and good interior

    original motor with car. Rebuit at 135,000 - now at 195,000

    Basically all original. No upgrades or customization.

    Owner says only rust located at door drain hole.

    No wrecks - ever.

    He says he wants 16,000.

    Any thoughts? :ear
    #1
  2. jeep44

    jeep44 junk collector

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  3. broncobowsher

    broncobowsher Long timer

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    Hard to say without getting a good close look at the car. But that looks to be a fairly decent price. Down a lot from the peak of the market. If you don't buy it at that price, someone else probably will.
    #3
  4. chazbird

    chazbird Long timer

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    Family had a 'new 65 GT 4 speed Fastback when I was a young teen. Its a cool car and we were agog. For some reason they replaced it in late '66 with a new '66 Mustang convertible automatic - $3150 or so. Maybe they got that because they were anticipating the kids soon learning to drive. Anyway, if it has drum brakes they are very weak and often need new pads/linings - otherwise, if remember correctly, the second car lasted nearly ten years with nothing major going wrong.
    #4
  5. Navin

    Navin Long timer

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    For a few K more you can get a brand new 2014 V6 6 speed with 305 HP that won't leak, bubble rust the paint, wobble down the road or break down every 2k miles. At least not yet or for 25 years! :evil

    My buddy was looking at a 66 vert and I steered him to a new 06 V6 vert. Says it was the best automotive move he ever made, and the 66 would have been the worst.

    My son bought a "stripper" 14 V6, it is an all around nicer and better car than my 03 Mach 1, except for torque. The AC is incredible, the handling is better stock than mine with mods, the dash doesn't shake like it isn't bolted down, it goes on and on. Mine has 24,000 miles!!!

    The 4.56 gears in my Mach are nasty, but when he gets 4.10 in the V6, he will have an awesome package with lower highway RPM than mine from the wide ratio 6 speed. The new structure from 05 up is just great.

    As great as the older cars look, they are still a 60s Falcon under the fenders!
    #5
  6. Navin

    Navin Long timer

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    BTW, 65 fastbacks are great looking cars, I do get it. :freaky
    #6
  7. Bueller

    Bueller Cashin?

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    Agreed. That's why the old Mustang I dreamed of owning for 30 years turned into the purchase of an 08 GT500. I couldn't be happier with my choice. I don't have to do anything more than put gas in it, drive it, clean it once in a while, and enjoy it.
    #7
  8. patmo

    patmo Long timer

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    I went through college with a 65 Mustang, a car that I have always loved ever since my uncle got a new red fastback in 65. Always been my favorite car...especially the fastback.

    However, even though I have had several chances to own another one over the last 20 years, I haven't pulled the trigger. I don't believe I ever will. In truth, as much as I have fond memories of my Mustang, it was really a piece of s**t car, that was basically worn out at 100K. A major part of that was the rust that the car was not prepared to resist when built. Today's cars do everything better and last much much longer as well.

    The real question for me becomes....Am I willing to spend that much money on a toy that looks killer, but doesn't drive, ride, handle, or last anywhere near what I can get for less money?

    Me? I take that 16K and either buy a couple more bikes OR look at a more modern car that will do EVERYTHING better than the 'Stang. One that I could also take on a road trip and not worry about breaking down. One that I could just enjoy DRIVING.
    #8
  9. chazbird

    chazbird Long timer

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    Now I remember why we traded the Fastback GT for the convertible. My mother. She wanted a convertible - before her looks started to "go". I remember her bitching about parking the GT/4 speed, too. But the GT was great as a kid to lay down in the back with the seats folded down and to look out that giant piece of glass. Probably not what you want to do with your possible purchase...

    Are new cars "better"? Certainly. But I do remember, very well, the visceral experience of the GT. I wouldn't ever call an early Mustang a shitty car, (not unreliable) but even then it was rough, but a "just right" rough.
    #9
  10. Navin

    Navin Long timer

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    My 2003 is refined when compared to a 1965, compared to a 2014, my 03 Mach 32v is a poorly built go kart with rope steering and loose rocks bouncing around under the fenders!

    Keep your memories intact and avoid driving one! :lol3
    #10
  11. nskitts

    nskitts Long timer

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    I had a '65 Fastback 289 3 Speed. Always required something and was a pain to keep on the road but there is nothing like it and if it is what you want, get it. There is no reasonable reason to get one but I don't suppose we are discussing a reasonable and practical subject.

    As a witty neighbor of mine said once, "Go ahead and get addicted to cocaine, you will end up spending less over the long run than keeping an old car on the road."
    #11
  12. Gimpinator

    Gimpinator Core Dumper

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    With that many miles, the car is going to need A LOT of work. I love the early fastbacks, but any old Mustang basically drives like crap after a certain number of miles. The car will need to be completely stripped down, suspension and steering rebuilt, new driveline parts, etc. I've also had bad surprises with other people's engine rebuilds. Sometimes it's not much more than a can of Krylon and some Chinese chrome valve covers.

    Things like water pumps, radiators, window regulators, rubber trim and seals, wiring harness connectors, headlamp switches and ignition switches will make you crazy unless you replace them. BTDT!

    If you love the car, it's worth it. Just be prepared to find a lot of crap under the surface. The price seems to be fair market though IMHO.
    #12
  13. Speedo66

    Speedo66 Transient

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    I've had a number of collectable cars, including 4 first series Mustangs.

    As long as you understand it's a toy, a hobby, etc. rather than an everyday driver you'll be fine. It will take some effort to keep it on the road, but if you're OK with that, it's a lot of fun to have something different. Buying a newer Mustang is not the equivalent.

    Now, specifically to the Mustang: before you even look at the exterior/interior, get down on your back and do a complete lap around the underside of the car. Bring a small screwdriver and poke, everywhere, looking for rust, extra heavy undercoating covering rust, and Bondo, you guessed it, filling in rust. Also check the front and rear fender wells and shock towers. Lift the carpet and look for rust. If you haven't got the message yet, these cars rust. When they were first producing them, there was a buying frenzy to the point that the factories were shipping them out, as fast as possible, without even spraying the inside door metal. Yes, bare metal was being sold! They sold almost 1 1/2 million of them in 3 years, a record not yet equaled. This is what made Lee Iacocca.

    There are sheet metal boxes under the car that add strength, plus the rockers help support the car. The car is unibody, so no separate frame, the floor pan and related sheet metal parts are the frame, so be very, very careful. This rust can be repaired, but it's pretty expensive work.

    There are many vendors selling repro parts, probably almost enough to assemble a new car. So getting parts, patch panels, floors, etc. is not a problem except for cost.

    There are several mods to increase the handling ability to the level of the Shelby's, including lowering the suspension points, better shocks and springs, poly bushings, better brakes, etc., but it's still going to handle, and stop, like a '60's car. Just be sure you know what you're getting into.

    The early fastbacks are arguably the best looking model, and currently the most expensive. Good luck with your toy!
    #13
  14. Anorak

    Anorak Woolf Barnato

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    It won't depreciate and any part you need is easy to get N.O.S., reproduction or aftermarket.It also looks better than any Mustang made after 1967.
    #14
  15. chazbird

    chazbird Long timer

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    Tell me, which ride, the 1965 or the 201X, is the Kinks "Sunny afternoon" going to sound better in?
    #15
  16. DMZ

    DMZ Castor Bean Addict

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    Look for:

    Wire spoke hubs - desirable
    Original Mustang paint color? - most were blue or red
    Sounds like it does not have the 289HiPro (it would have a 4bbl carb, different cam and lifters)
    Check the springs/shocks, OEM springs were notoriously soft and weak
    Check dash padding for cracks
    60k on a rebuilt 289 is a lot, IMO, it may not have much life left in it.
    Check front buckets for any cracks in the vinyl

    $16k seems a bit high unless it is 90% or better.

    I had a '65 hardtop (271 HP Windsor V8 engine/ 3 speed auto) that was the coolest car I ever owned. I rebuilt the engine at 105k then the auto-tran went south. Sold it while I was overseas with the US Army.
    #16
  17. Hardware02

    Hardware02 Long timer

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    To the OP...have you driven one of the "sports" cars of that era?

    Understand it'll probably handle like a barge...
    #17
  18. Navin

    Navin Long timer

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    On the perfect day, perfect road in a perfect example, the 65 is great.

    If the temps rise above 57f, the tar isn't absolutely perfect and the radio is stock, the 2014! :lol3
    #18
  19. Anorak

    Anorak Woolf Barnato

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    Well, since everybody has decided you should buy a new Mustang instead of what you want, have you thought about a fucking TDI? It will get better fuel economy and it will blah blah blah much better than the car you want.

    Hey assholes no shit, it's a 48 year old American car, it's not going to drive like a new car but that's not a bad thing. Old cars are fun to drive, too. My guess is that if he wanted a new fucking car, he would have asked about a fucking new car.
    #19
  20. chazbird

    chazbird Long timer

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    The roads were better and the music was better in 1965. Not sure where that leads one to, picking a 2013 Mustang?
    #20