Tiny House Movement

Discussion in 'Shiny Things' started by osii, Jul 25, 2010.

  1. Mr. Fisherman

    Mr. Fisherman PROUD 2B Riff Raff!

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    You call that living tiny?

    <iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/T1tV-ovGPyc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

    Some pretty good ideas...
  2. Jurgen

    Jurgen CysHeteroPatriarch Super Moderator

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    Tiny Houses are making YahooNews...

    Tiny houses on the market nationwide

  3. Manuel Garcia O'Kely

    Manuel Garcia O'Kely Back at last

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    Oh well, it was nice while it lasted....<GGGG>

    It's almost like we are going post-consumerism in a very small way.

    Would be interesting to see urban planning based on some smaller houses sort of backing into large shared common areas - IOW, small personal lots and houses with a back yard that opens into a commons - and the front side had the street and parking - lots of interesting ideas I would think

    Even small duplex units would potentially work well.

    If done properly, these types of developments could also share things like heat - a common boiler plant with distribution for heat and domestic hot water would save space in the homes and simplify home upkeep with no water heater or boiler/furnace. Metering would not be a problem.

    Wonder how much of this is being driven, if any, by the economy.
  4. battlecattle

    battlecattle Been here awhile

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  5. cogitate

    cogitate What Marcellus Wallace Looks Like

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    Love this thread. Back in the 80's, I worked in NY but lived near by in Greenwich, CT. Only because that was the only place I could find a rental! It was a tiny house, I must have pics somewhere, might have to scan them if I can find my scanner.

    The woman who owned the main house was a famous author, but I don't remember her name:eek1
    The little house was walking distance from the main house, located in front of a pond. It was appx. 20 by 20 feet, IIRC. There was a stove, a cooktop, but a half frig. The main room seemed large, there was a murphy bed that dropped out of the wall. It faced a HUGE sliding glass door, which faced the pond. It was filled with bookshelves, because when she would sequester her self back in her writing days she liked to read too. I could not put enough books on the shelves, ever! There was a small bathroom on the opposite side of the kitchen, with a standup shower stall. In front of the house, there was a car port. On the side, was a door with a 3 foot wide by 7 or eight foot long storage space. If I did have a moto at the time, it would have fit in the space. High ceiling, lots of windows. You could barely see the main house from the little one, and visa versa.

    It was really cool, and the first tiny house I ever saw. I was there for several years.
  6. PirateJohn

    PirateJohn Banned

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    Thanks Mon!

    I think that I have a scheme to build some lifts that would attach to the corners and lift a 20 ft. container vertically. Have been talking to the builder of this trailer about building one with retractable twist locks so that a 20 ft. container could be loaded between the gooseneck and the fenders and locked into place:

    [​IMG]




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  7. MitchG

    MitchG Iron Collector

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    FYI: Fenders/wheels on the outside of a 20' container would constitute a "wide load" in most North American jurisdictions necessitating a dimensionally oversized load permit and adherence to any included conditions in that permit. Also, these permits are usually only good for a single move under controlled conditions.
  8. PirateJohn

    PirateJohn Banned

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    Correct. Trailer is 102" wide. The idea is that the container would load in front of the fenders.


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  9. MitchG

    MitchG Iron Collector

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    Thanks, understood now. So in that configuration you'd be getting over 50% of the gross trailer & modified container weight transferred to the gooseneck hitch? Do you have a weight estimate?
  10. Manuel Garcia O'Kely

    Manuel Garcia O'Kely Back at last

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    That was the first thing I thought of - might be easier to weld up rails to mount it above the axles, unless that makes it too tall and unwieldy.

    Seems to me that a regular frame and cheap tractor might be more cost effective.
  11. PirateJohn

    PirateJohn Banned

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    Trailer has a GVW Of 18,000 lbs. and the truck is a Class 5 with a 16,000 GVW. Tare weight of an empty 20 ft. ISO container is around 6,000 lbs. so everything should be well within specs.


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  12. PirateJohn

    PirateJohn Banned

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    If I go through with this project the trailer will be used as a platform for a park model trailer/demountable modular housing unit and garage combo. I wanted to get the height down so that the step in height was a few steps lower than if it were mounted over the wheels.

    Carrying a 20 ft. container is just a side benefit. I agree that if the trailer were dedicated to moving ISO containers that I'd probably go with another design.


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  13. MeterPig

    MeterPig Meh

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    It's amazing how governments try to shoe horn a free citizen into their viewpoint. Live in a motor home , fine. Live aboard a boat? Bad.
  14. JamesG

    JamesG Rabid Poster

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    It's all about the revenue generation.
  15. cab591

    cab591 Been here awhile

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    Almost forgot about this one: It won a few design awards years ago. There was a little bit of publicity, and they were going to sell them -- but I haven't heard anything since.

    [​IMG]

    It's called the "Micro Compact Home". It's a house in a 9 foot cube. They can be towed, air lifted, or set in place by a crane (or a bunch of college students, provided you supply enough beer).

    [​IMG]

    The layout is weird, but effective. You walk in the front door, straight into a "wetzone" bathroom. The floor allows water to drain, and there's a toilet and a shower head. From a functional perspective, you could leave dirty / wet shoes and clothes here, and keep the house part clean. From there, you walk into the rest of the "house". A galley kitchen is on the left, and a sunken dinette on the right. The dinette seats are at floor level, with foot space below deck. Above the dinette is a full sized, extra long bed that folds up and out of the way. The dinette table drops down and forms another bed, at floor level. To the right and back (in line with the bathroom) is storage.

    [​IMG]

    I really like the modern styling, but I'm partial on walking into the bathroom. Either put a curtain in front of the toilet (so you don't see it when you walk in), or have a second door where the small window is, at the opposite end.
  16. cab591

    cab591 Been here awhile

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    More on the unit:

    They can be free-standing, and self sufficient (solar panels, wind turbines, what have you):

    [​IMG]

    Or part of a community, with the use of walkways and decks:

    [​IMG]
    (Note: This image shows part of the original design and testing. The manufacturer established a small community of the units on a college campus, and used them for cheap, single-student housing.)

    There was even a conceptual multi-leveled "tree" community:

    [​IMG]
  17. JamesG

    JamesG Rabid Poster

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    Looks too much like a cell. As in a prison cell. A tiny house should be beautiful, artistic, not look like an appliance or the back kitchen of a McDonalds. IMO.
  18. Manuel Garcia O'Kely

    Manuel Garcia O'Kely Back at last

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    81 square feet just gets into the seriously tiny - far smaller than I would find desirable as a residence.
  19. battlecattle

    battlecattle Been here awhile

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    I like it, I lived in 100sq ft and had ample room and the only thing I didn't have was a bathroom. My bigger concern would be the noise from weather with the lack of noise deadening materials.
  20. cab591

    cab591 Been here awhile

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    Well, it's designed and built by the Germans, so no doubt it's over-engineered. As for the size, it's not too different than living in a small trailer... only it'd be warmer in the winter. Styling is subjective. I like the clean, minimalist look. For a young, single person, it looks comfortable.