Tiny House Movement

Discussion in 'Shiny Things' started by osii, Jul 25, 2010.

  1. Reconstructed

    Reconstructed Been here awhile

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  2. Jurgen

    Jurgen CysHeteroPatriarch Super Moderator

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    An interesting article on moving to smaller houses, in this case trailers, as we age.

    [​IMG]

    How The Trailer Park could Save us All.
  3. Zapp22

    Zapp22 ZAPP - Tejas

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    not exactly tiny, but show me a plan for something in the neighborhood of 20x20 [roughly], 1.5 story/level so the upper is mainly storage...
    Or, come to think of it, the lower is garage [MC] + storage + farm implements, and the 'loft' is living space....:deal

    and re: online floorplans/plans - why do so few offer CAD files? paper... are you kidding me? I realize that folks building the thing will resort to hardcopy but why so few designers offering the CAD files?
  4. perterra

    perterra -. --- .--. .

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  5. cab591

    cab591 Been here awhile

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    Yeah, that was pages back. Still makes me drool. :tb



    On the trailer park topic: I actually had just finished reading that article before seeing it linked here -- jalopnik posted it. It really does bring up a good point. Modern pre-manufactured homes are built to the same standards as most traditional houses, just a lot cheaper. The communities are often friendly and active. Some friends and I are looking into rental houses for the next year, but now we're thinking of buying a cheap, used single wide. The only issue we're running into are the parks in Arizona -- I swear every single one is 55+. Young people can't want to live in trailers, too? :D
  6. Ken

    Ken Long timer

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    "Cabinology: The study and implementation of personal dreams related to planning, designing, constructing and/or living a simple life, in a simple structure, close to nature, the purpose of which is to bring peace, contentment and satisfaction to one's soul ...."

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  7. PirateJohn

    PirateJohn Banned

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    Everyone (seemingly) has seen the RV retirement parks in Florida. I stumbled across the over-55 parks in the RGV of South Texas several years ago. To me this article paints somewhat of a depressing picture of getting older but I have to say that the parks themselves in Texas tend to be pretty decent. As we get older and want less hassle and more time to take care of our hobbies they make great sense.
  8. JNRobert

    JNRobert Breaking Wind

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    As long as you have someone to share it with. It's just as soulless as a McMansion on a smaller scale otherwise.
  9. Beemer Bob

    Beemer Bob Long timer

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    Those trees will be a big issue for the roof..........
  10. Hay Ewe

    Hay Ewe Just a Wannabe

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    WOW!
    GREAT thread.
    read most of it last weekend and just finished now.
    Given me LOTS of thoughts and already we are going to make some shelves - up over three doors.

    No time to make a longer post now but rest assured there will be one soon.

    Hay Ewe
  11. PaddedHat

    PaddedHat Been here awhile

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    Ever do a service call on a newer manufactured home where the center of the floors were crowning upward severely, as the frame outriggers (supporting exterior walls) were failing and the weight of the roof and exterior walls of the home was bowing the floor joists 2" in 14'? Ever tear into the roof of a 28' wide manufactured home with scissors trusses, only to find trusses made of 2"x2" material (in a 50lb/psf snow load region) shingles that were well below 200lbs a square, (or about as thick as a cereal box), and Kraft paper used instead of roofing felt? Ever see a manufactured home with a $25 aluminum storm window screwed to both sides on a trimmed and paneled rough opening, since it's a few bucks less than using the cheapest piece of shit vinyl window available? Ever deal with hundreds of sq. ft. of rotting 3/4" particle board subfloor, and a homeowner that is so broke that they have to decide if falling through the floor is a bigger risk that not paying their utilities this month.
    Having done all of this, I can't quite agree that it's "no different than a stick house"

    They serve a purpose. There are extremely well built "state code" modular homes available, that can be done to far higher standards than the average clubbed together tract house. That sad, most "HUD code" modular and/or manufactured housing tend to be built to a price point, with a whole lot of shiny bling being top priority, and durability, energy efficiency, longevity etc...... falling WAY down the list of priorities.

    I'm not elitist, and I can clearly see spending my later years hopping around a pair of park model trailers, strategically located in good climates. That said, they will be used, since they depreciate like a rock falling into a canyon, and I will be well aware that a lot of the place is staying together out of habit, with a bit of glue and a few staples helping.
  12. Zapp22

    Zapp22 ZAPP - Tejas

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    i'm glad this thread popped up again so I can vent..
    so frustrating: I've been trying to find a plan online for which I can get blasted CAD files. no luck. i found a few things that are very very close to what I have in my head and on scratch paper - only needing minor changes, but the only way the designers sell is paper. then if you want to change it the price triples.
    have any of you fought through this?

    equally frustrating is trying to find a CAD guy that can just knock out the job. I guess the demand for those skills is so great here [one of the top 5 or so fastest growing counties in the nation] that the good ones are all rapidly absorbed into big builders, or go into education, or architectural/engineering, so only the culls and the students remain
  13. hysterwv

    hysterwv Adventurer

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    Jalopnik probably wasn't discussing a trailer. There is a significant difference between a trailer and a "pre-manufactured" home. Generally, a pre-manufactured (or modular) home is a stick built home that is constructed indoors in a manufacturing facility. The home is built in "modules" that are then transported by truck (not a mobile home frame) and are set in-place on a foundation with a crane.

    <iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/OIiMfWE4WaE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
  14. PirateJohn

    PirateJohn Banned

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    Depends. Some manufacturers that sell here in Texas sell mobile homes and modular homes that are built on the same assembly line. It evidently varies by state. My father bought and resold several "modular houses" in Kentucky that were brought into town in big sections on dedicated trailers, and then removed from those trailers. In Texas a modular home usually is basically a trailer without wheels. Evidently most places in Texas require that the wheels remain attached while in many states you can take the wheels off and lower the trailer's overall height.

    But 28 ft. is pretty wide. That has to be two 14 ft. wide sections to get down most roads.

    I have been looking at mobile homes and staying with some friends that have mobile homes. There is a big difference in quality, and even the nice ones usually bore me with their appearance.

    This is a trailer. Not available in Texas:

    [​IMG]

    This is a prefab steel house. Also not available in Texas:

    [​IMG]

    This is a 782 sq. ft. contemporary mobile home. I thought it would be perfect. It was in a poster on the door of the sales lady at the local Palm Harbor dealer and she had never looked closely at the poster on her own door. After my insisting that she call the corporate offices they finally decided that it was no longer in production.

    (This one has stone work added which makes it less mobile, but the series was originally designed to scale from a 782 sq. ft. single wide to a double wide and finally a triple wide).

    [​IMG]

    Been very frustrating finding what I want. Either the available product is butt ugly, or when I find what I want it's unavailable or unGodly expensive.





    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
  15. AWolff

    AWolff AWolff

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    Got any details, or a link, on that one?

    -AWolff
  16. PaddedHat

    PaddedHat Been here awhile

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    Sorry but there is zero difference between a "trailer" and a manufactured home. Specifically the traditional single/double wide industry was building such total shit that they need an 'image makeover". Two things were occurring at the time. First, there were multitudes of manufactured home builders building high quality products that met state and national stick building codes, and were being marketed as "modular homes". Second the trailer industry was governed by HUD standards. The trailer industry then was allowed to upgrade their image by soiling the reputation of the modular industry. They went from being "house trailer builders" to "HUD code modular" manufacturers. Same shit, new name.
    So in your comments you referred to "trailers" a word that the trailer industry avoids like Herpes, and further muddied the facts by claiming that "manufactured homes" are modular. This type of confusion makes the POS trailer builders grin from ear to ear. The fact is that high quality manufactured home builders build to "State code" specs. which typically involve the umbrella of national codes, typically the IRC single family dwelling requirements, and any state or local requirements for energy efficiently, seismic and wind load requirements etc....They then call these products "state code modular". Since HUD hasn't change much of anything in the way of oversight in the last thirty years, and the wacko fuck nuts at the IRC add hundreds of requirements every three years, comparing a manufactured home (trailer) to a state code modular is a little like saying that a new Ford fusion and a 1980s Yugo are the same product since they are both cars.

    BTW, I have been a builder since the 80s. I just sold my personal home, a state code modular that we lived in for 12 years. It was a rock solid home, full of amazing upgrades and workmanship. It also cost about 20% less than a site built home, and sold for the same price as a stick home.

    It really comes down to one thing after all the sales bullshit has been slung, and the smoke clears. The question is...... where is the steel frame when it's all over? If it left the day of the "set" , as in the set crew unbolted the house from the 'carrier" and the hauler took it back to the factory to be reused, it's a state code modular. If it's still under the home, and remains an integral part of the structure, it's a TRAILER. Doesn't matter if it's being marketed as a "modular", "HUD code modular" or a manufacturer home, it's a fekin' trailer, end of story. If you are accustomed to the quality of a well built custom stick built home, you will probably find that 99% of all trailers are going to seem pretty cheezy. Since they work from a totally different play book, they are not even close to being well built, particularly when you get under the skin. You will find a structure that is marginal, at best, and a whole new world of materials that can obscure, far from durable and a real bitch to repair, replace, or renovate. Everything from electrical devices (switches, outlets, etc..) that don't get installed in boxes, or have standard wire nut connections to odd, hard to find plumbing parts, 3/8" drywall, none standard doors, trim, windows etc...... I've repaired and added to a few of them. Once you get them ripped open, you get a true appreciation for the definition of "value engineering"
  17. JNRobert

    JNRobert Breaking Wind

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  18. PirateJohn

    PirateJohn Banned

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    I found that in a Metal Architecture magazine and for the life of me I cannot find the issue at the moment, and looking at my notes and postings elsewhere I didn't identify it.

    I just did a Google for "pre-fab steel home built in Palm Springs, CA" and several similar designs showed up.

    If I can find it I will pass the info on to you Amigo.
  19. PirateJohn

    PirateJohn Banned

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    Well, sorta and once again it depends on regions and areas. I have seen some fancy homes that were built in sections in Scandinavia that were built in a factory, trucked in sections, and assembled. And those were nothing like the rectangular houses that you see in rural USA.

    By the same token I know there were some projects in the USA to replicate this. I have no idea how successful they were, this was years ago, and in the Northeastern USA as I recall.

    But you are right that finding a quality manufactured/modular home and/or trailer is frustrating. The things that I have seen were hyper expensive and/or didn't stay on the market long.

    And there are some really crappy mobile homes out there.

    When I Google "Scandinavian manufactured homes" I find images like this:

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
  20. PirateJohn

    PirateJohn Banned

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    I like that spare usage of wooden paneling, matching the floor presumably, to add color to all the white.

    Does anyone know if engineered wooden flooring can be used on a wall? That's an idea that I have kicked around.