tips on how not to drop your supermoto?

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by MudEverywhere, Apr 4, 2013.

  1. MudEverywhere

    MudEverywhere Adventurer

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    i was going around a right hand turn in my supermoto and lost control, then slid into mud ditch. bike seems fine thankfully besides a few scratches and broken mirror :cry. but my confidence is kaput . I think what happened was that I took a terrible line and got too low and tried coasting thru the turn.

    my first post
    #1
  2. Mgbgt89

    Mgbgt89 Long timer

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    Tried coasting through the turn? Did you pull in the clutch or let it engine brake? My 625 will easily slide the rear under engine braking.
    #2
  3. wiseblood

    wiseblood Hall Monitor

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    You need to get yourself some advanced training! Seriously, go buy a copy of "Total Control":

    http://www.amazon.com/Total-Control-Performance-Street-Techniques/dp/0760314039


    Read it, then take the class:

    http://www.totalcontroltraining.net/


    TC isn't the only class, but I've taken it, and I think it would address your confidence issues, as well as your technique.


    As far as "what happened" -- it would be a number of things. Without more detail, it's hard to know. However, you mention "coasting" and that could easily be it. Your bike is most stable in a turn when you have a small amount of throttle. If you chop the throttle in a turn, you are effectively causing the front wheel to suddenly take on a greater proportion of the weight of the vehicle. If the front is already using s significant amount of its available traction, throwing more weight on the front could easily cause it to lose traction.

    Though, your crash might just as easily have been target fixation. Did you crash before running off the road? Or, did you ride off the road into the ditch?
    #3
  4. MudEverywhere

    MudEverywhere Adventurer

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    Thanks for the reply.

    I will probably take an advanced motorcycle safety course. It was my Dads bike given to me. To quote him, "You are a danger to yourself." I tend to go too fast.. My Dad has a million motorcycle books I'll check one of them out. He taught me everything but I still mess up from time to time. I know how I am supposed to ride.. just don't always put it to practice.

    It was a sharp right hand turn with a bit of an incline. What happened was that I came into the turn too fast. Number one problem right there. I always go too fast always trying to push myself.. SO I had to slow down during the middle of my turn to avoid going into the other lane. I was i third gear should have been in second.. Then the bike was leaned far to the right. I pulled the clutch in when I braked at this point and that took away all my power and then lost traction, lowsided, slid about 10 ft on road into a muddy ditch. Bike runs fine but there a few scratches.

    A quick synopsis on how I am supposed to ride.. I always try to look thru the turn. Start my line from the outside in. Brake before the turn. Keep power to the wheels. Push down and keep my weight on the opposite peg. Keep weight off my handlebars. Accelerate out of the turn. Avoid gravel, etc.

    Dad just gave me a book to read.. "A Twist of the Wrist II"
    #4
  5. Meromorph

    Meromorph Expat Brit in TN.

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    Dumb way to die ... :eek1
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  6. MudEverywhere

    MudEverywhere Adventurer

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    It is a dumb way to die. I shouldnt have said that anyway. I have much more to learn.
    #6
  7. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

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    I would say pushing it is for dirt riding or on the track.
    At least if you do not want to end up in the hospital.

    But it depends on what you are looking for, if you want to take risks, you have to figure its not always going to go your way, and can end up with a broken mirror, or a broken spine.
    People around here seem to gear up and push limits some, which is ok in my book (on a motorcycle) as you will likely only hurt yourself if it goes wrong. Its fun, can build skill, but it can be expensive.
    Just riding involves a lot of risk, and if its dumb to push the limits on the street, its almost as dumb to ride at all.
    What I do is to reduce the risks my way.
    I do not wear much gear, which makes me not want to go down, so I only push it to about 80% of my ability. I am not thinking if I slide out I will just ride away painlessly.

    That 80% mostly involves going no faster then I can react to things, a turn sharper then I expected (gets most riders), something in/on the road, etc.

    If I can SEE the turn is sharp, I will take it at 80%, if I can not see through the turn, I slow down enough till I can see through it.

    If I wanted to do 100%, I would gear up and hit the track.

    I have avoided some really nasty stuff because I do not over ride my sight lines, ever.
    Things you would not even think about.
    Like 3 feet of water in a blind turn a long time after a rain, one lane each way, a rock wall on one side, a drop off on the other.
    My normal fun speed would have ended badly, even without traffic, as I would have hit 3 feet of standing water at speed and ended up someplace nasty, into the rock wall, off the cliff, or into an oncoming car.
    #7
  8. MudEverywhere

    MudEverywhere Adventurer

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    I will have to stop pushing myself you're right. I'll keep 80% in mind from now on.
    #8
  9. ohgood

    ohgood Long timer

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    in for the subscribe, and wow is there gonna be some advice....
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  10. MudEverywhere

    MudEverywhere Adventurer

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    Thanks for the help guys. I'll go slower.
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  11. motorat

    motorat TBD

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    it sounds like your father has given you a good foundation for riding a motorcycle.
    i would suggest you find a local school or do some track days because if you are
    like most sons, i know mine does, they discount what their father says
    if you hear it from an instructor it will reinforce what you have already been taught
    and you might learn something new.
    there are enough cagers trying to take you out, don't help them by riding above your limit.

    have fun and continue to pratice.
    #11
  12. LuciferMutt

    LuciferMutt Rides slow bike slow

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    Well, the fact that you are here, admitting you made a mistake and looking for advice speaks volumes to me. We all do dumb shit -- most of us survive, but many do not!

    Slow down a bit and enjoy the ride. Throttle THRU the turns -- this means you go into the turn more slowly than you will come out of it -- think about that: it means you need to enter any corner slowly enough that you will be able to maintain speed or accelerate the entire way through it. Try to get your braking done before you lean the bike.

    (yes, trailbraking experts, I know, I know, shut the hell up)
    #12
  13. GR0NK

    GR0NK Got some screws loose!

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    Do you have any dirbike experience? The best advice I can give you is to go play off-road to hone your on-road skills. This applies no matter what you ride but especially on a SuMo because it is essentially a dirtbike. Grip riding is all fun and all but if you don't have the knowledge of how to control a bike when it loses grip you are putting yourself at a distinct disadvantage. If you still have the knobbies for that bike put 'em on and go practice in deep sand,mud and finally gravel roads. Gravel will really let a bike move underneath you and let you build trust and confidence.


    Sean :bmwrider
    #13
  14. DowDuer

    DowDuer !rn00b-aK

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    Put your weight on the outside peg. Roll on to the throttle so the bike "Sits up" a little and it will turn better. Go play in the dirt on a regular basis.
    #14
  15. Idle

    Idle Been here awhile

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    What bike, what kind of tires, what size rear tire, what psi, are you "bigger than most", what riding position do you normally use, foot on the peg, or foot out, are you hanging off, or pushing the bike down and sitting up,,,,and, what tire lost traction first?

    I'm guessing you have long wearing sport-touring tires with way too much air in them, and or you are/were sitting too far back with feet on the pegs and the front slipped.

    How did I do?

    It happens, at least you got back up!

    I have the same tip as others,..the dirt is calling you!

    My motard is 285 wet, I'm 235 with gear and run 23-25psi front, 27 rear on the road. I sit up by the tank, push the bike down, and put my inside foot out often on pavement. ***Keep your foot up, don't ever skim the road**

    It prolly isn't neccesry as I'm not ever going more than 80% on the road but it works for me. It's just what I saw erryone else doing on YouTube.

    Really though, by moving up to the tank, and putting your boot almost even with the front axle while cornering, it plants the front tire firmly on the ground (paved or not) You just have to be careful with the throttle so the rear won't slip too much.

    For dirt, I drop to 16-18 psi front, and 15-17 rear. No tire or rim or rock related oopsies so far in over 500 miles of pretty AND ugly dirt roads and trails.

    Serious on the dirt riding on street tires, it's awesome.. Like mentioned above, brake, then gas it a little as you go thru the corner street and dirt.


    Oh, one more thing, don't seek and ride "lines" through the corners on the street.

    Right corners, ride in the left wheel track that cars make.

    For left corners, if it's a sharp turn with limited visibility, ride in the right wheel track. If you have a good view ahead on a sweeper turn, ride in the left wheel track.

    There's a lot of squirrel guts, oil, transmission fluid, coolant, dirt, sand, and who knows what else in the middle of the lane. It's where the car tires don't travel, and has been the primary reason for most solo motorcycle accidents.
    #15
  16. the Pheasant

    the Pheasant Been here awhile

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    Wot they all said...
    But I'd add this: don't pull in the clutch and coast around the corner 'cos you will likely go straight on.
    And dare I mention countersteering? That is, learn to use it consciously and you'll greatly increase the steering control available mid-corner. As explained in great detail in parts of this thread
    #16
  17. chippertheripper

    chippertheripper motorcycle junkie

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    Look where you want to go, chuck that thing in there, and ROLL on the gas as you make your way through the turn. It's a dirtbike, don't be afraid to manhandle it.

    And definitely get some rider education. It's cheaper than fixing yourself and your scooter. Because crashing in a right hand corner in the states typically means sliding across the oncoming lane. Which should absolutely terrify you to think about.
    #17