TomTom Rider 450/Garmin Zumo 395LM offroad use?

Discussion in 'GPS 101 - Which GPS For Me' started by MrNemobody, Dec 7, 2017.

  1. MrNemobody

    MrNemobody Adventurer

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    Hi Guys.

    I love to travel with my bike. Like a lot of us here.

    So I'm tired to use my cellphone to navigate, I want something better, I want a real GPS.

    Because I'm first of all a road eater, I want one good for road use.

    Those in my title looks great for ride without brain, let it chose roads, and just enjoy.

    But, because I'm also a guy who didn't like limits, I'm thinking about use it with my offroad bike too. Is it something possible? Are those GPS able to guide me in the dirt? And if the answer is "yes", do they do it out of the box or will I have to fight with them or with downloadable maps?
    #1
  2. Daboo

    Daboo Been here awhile

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    If you're going with the 4.3 inch size, I'd get the TomTom. I'm not sure about off-road maps, so you'll have to do your own research there. The TomTom's Winding Roads is far superior than the Garmin Adventurous Routing or Curvy Roads feature. On a motorcycle, that's a big plus.

    If you're going Garmin, I'd look for a refurbished 590 or 595. I bought a 590 a year or so ago that was refurbished. Several hundred less than new and about the same price as the 395LM new. The added screen size is really nice when you're trying to see your route. I've heard you can download the firmware for a 595 and install it on a 590. Hardware wise, they are the same. That's not true with the smaller 390/395 models. The 590/595 LM will accept off-road maps.

    Chris
    #2
  3. MrNemobody

    MrNemobody Adventurer

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    Ok guy, thanks for your answer.

    I just called Tomtom, they told me there is some forest roads include in their maps but not really any possibility to have more.

    I can't have Garmin at this hour, but their website seem to contain lot of topo maps, quite expensive, but still availlable. Do you know, if those maps (wich are for bicycle/hiking) can be add to a motorbike GPS model?

    And obviously, Garmin seems to be open to custom maps. According to their customers service, Tomtom aren't.
    #3
  4. MrNemobody

    MrNemobody Adventurer

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    Crap, i forgot to ask about gpx maps...
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  5. ohgood

    ohgood Just givver tha berries !!!

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    if you're dead set on Garmin, the Montana is the one everyone says to use for offroad, but it's too limited/small so I just use my phone.
    #5
  6. chrisjk

    chrisjk Been here awhile

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    TomTom doesn't do off-road. As @ohgood says, Montana is your best bet for off-road, if you really want a Garmin. However, its routing is not as good as the newer units like the Zumo 595 so for regular road riding it is a bit compromised.
    #6
  7. MrNemobody

    MrNemobody Adventurer

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    Ok Guys, thanks for your answers.

    Apparently take a device for both is complicated. Maybe I should take one for each use.

    And Chris, you said "Montana is your best bet for off-road, if you really want a Garmin"
    Do you mean there is a better choice for offroad in other brands?
    #7
  8. MrNemobody

    MrNemobody Adventurer

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    Finaly, reading your answers here reminds me I haven't phone to garmin yet.

    Just did it. The guy tells me all topo maps can be mount on zumo 395/595.

    So the twice solutions are:

    One road GPS (probably tomtom, more countries out of the box) + one offroad GPS (montana?)
    or
    Zumo for both (but, after add a lot of expensive maps for offroad and countries wich are not include)
    #8
  9. chrisjk

    chrisjk Been here awhile

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    Apart from TomTom, I am unfamiliar with other dedicated satnav brands. They are relatively few in number I believe and certainly uncommon amongst motorcyclists. I meant that I felt a Montana was better suited to off-road than other Garmin models.
    #9
  10. MrNemobody

    MrNemobody Adventurer

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    [​IMG]
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  11. bross

    bross Where we riding to?

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    Spend some time here..., will give you a good idea of what you should get. A bit dated but still relevant.

    http://globeriders.com/article_pages/article02_gps/article02_gps.shtml
    http://globeriders.com/article_pages/article08_RTW/article08_rtw.shtml
    http://globeriders.com/article_pages/article03_gps/article03_montana.shtml

    Last year I finally ditched my inexpensive car based Nuvi which had provided years of road based use, and bought a Zumo 660, partly based on Gloderiders info. I also have and use a Delorme PN-60 for off road because it's paired to my Spot, but have started using the Zumo for both road based and dual sport rides. It handles tracks as well as the PN-60 and at least I can see the screen on the Zumo while riding. With my eye sight getting worse I can't see the tiny screen on the PN-60 while riding so usually have to stop or at least slow way down at intersections or splits in the trail to see which way to go.
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  12. ohgood

    ohgood Just givver tha berries !!!

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    phones do it better, but you stated you were tired of your phone and wanted a "real gps". that normally means the person saying it only wants to consider a stand alone GPS, which is why I suggested the Montana. it's not great, but it fit your requirements, and it's the best gamin offers. phones still kill it.
    #12
  13. bkg123

    bkg123 Yes, that bike makes your ass look fat

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    I’ve had my zumo390 for years. Many miles of heat, cold, rain, snow, road and off road use. Its old and beat up but still works great. Im moving up to the 595 sometime soon, before the 390 finally dies. I highly recommend the Zumo’s. Never ever let me down.
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  14. MrNemobody

    MrNemobody Adventurer

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    Yeah I like the idea of big screen, it's comfy.
    I will read your links anyway!
    Phone does it well but my phone is not waterproof, not shockproof, and most of all, i'm tired to care about my battery life, don't want to let it plug all the day ;)
    I like this kind of user return!


    Thanks for your help guys!
    #14
  15. ohgood

    ohgood Just givver tha berries !!!

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    buy one that is for $40
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  16. MrNemobody

    MrNemobody Adventurer

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    Question is: why do you consider that's better than a stand alone GPS?
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  17. bkg123

    bkg123 Yes, that bike makes your ass look fat

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    Im not answering for ohgood, or anyone else but myself..... It all depends on what your used to, and what your comfortable with. I use basecamp to plan trips, and save tracks. I have hundreds of routes, tracks, waypoints saved. Im real comfortable with the software, and the cost of a new GPS isn’t an issue for me. I use my iphone all the time in my car, and its great. But my Zumo is bulletproof and it always does exactly what I want. Cant ever say the same for my phone.
    Others on this forum are exactly opposite. Mac vs Windows, Ford vs Toyota, Mcdonalds vs ???.
    Good luck
    #17
  18. ohgood

    ohgood Just givver tha berries !!!

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    all the GPS /software functionality of the standalone units, lots of rugged versions to choose from, no wires needed, no computer needed, basecamp isn't required to shuffle things around or make room ever, almost unlimited track/waypoint/poi/map storage, map updates take seconds from anywhere, sharing everything (including maps ) is fast and simple, track editing on device, route editing on device, the ability to snap a picture of a map at a trailhead then georeference it and use it like any other on the trail, no proprietary mounts required, no proprietary cables required, no proprietary software required, Bluetooth pairing that works, Wi-Fi that works, the list just keeps going and going.

    also, the entry fee is around $40-50 for a (used) rugged phone, $5-10 for a mount, $4-10 for an application. no cellular service needed, ever. most people already have one in their pocket so buying another GPS is unneeded, redundant.

    and it's easier to use.

    the database is scheduled to upload three times a week to an online host, so if I ever manage to smash one bad enough to destroy the sdcard, $40 (new) at the Walmart, five minutes if downloading and I'll have all my tracks back.

    it just keeps going, but basically the standalone units were good in their day, but no longer needed.
    #18