Too much information...

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Hesaid, Dec 4, 2012.

  1. greer

    greer Long timer

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    Ordered that link yet? You realize it's under $30, right? Too cheap and easy not to try.

    Also, did the dealer lower the front by swapping around the fork internals (proper factory method) or just slip the tubes up in the clamps? You need the bike lowered by the book, THEN you slip the fork tubes up and add the link. It's all in the factory service manual but you may have to point that out to the guys in the shop. If you paid to have the bike lowered they need to do it right. Seems like lots of shops go at it the lazy way, so be sure and check.

    You two had a fine plan, sometimes S### just happens.

    Sarah
    #21
  2. ER70S-2

    ER70S-2 Long timer

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    I'm surprised how many times I've heard that the shops just slip the forks up in the triple clamps. There isn't that much room over the front tire at full compression for the tire to clear the fender. Suzuki says we have 10.2" of suspension travel, front and rear. I just measured from my front tire to the fender--10.5" That only leaves a theoretical .3" clearance at full compression. A properly set up suspension will bottom on occassion. There are several riders who have slipped their forks up in the triples and they aren't having any clearance problems. I've ridden mine for thousands of miles with the forks up 1/2" with no interference between the tire and fender (10.0").

    How do you tell if your forks have been shortened by the factory method? My stock forks (full extension) are 35 1/4" from the fork cap to the axle centerline. Factory lowered should be 33 3/4".
    #22
  3. RyanR

    RyanR Been here awhile

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    A couple things:

    A motorcycle safety course is a great idea. It may seem a little slow paced but they really do drill the basics into your head with heavy focus on slow speed maneuvering. Being able to navigate your bike at 2MPH through a parking lot comfortably is just as important as being able to rail through the canyons or blast down the dirt roads. As you're both all too aware you can just as easily injure yourself in a parking lot as you can out exploring the wilds.

    Too heavy, too tall and in denial. You said you laughed at the suggestion she try a lighter bike like a Ninja 250. While the Ninja is technically similar in weight it is also a much lower bike that carries it's weight down low. The DR is a tall bike that carries much of it's weight up high. If you sit on both and try walking them around a parking lot and putting a foot down at a light you will realize that even though it's curb weight is similar the little Ninja will feel like riding a mountain bike in comparison to the DR.

    I mean no offense with my comments. I made the same mistakes, my first bike was an 08 KLR650. I am 6'1" and 200lbs. If I could go back in time I would punch myself in the face and buy a little 250 dual sport instead. Can your girl squat 350lbs comfortably several times a day when she's already worn out from riding and probably a bit banged up from dropping her bike? I know it took about 2-3 times picking up my KLR before I was hating the day and wishing I was doing just about anything else but riding...

    Park the DR, get her a little 250 to learn on and hop back on the DR once she's comfortable. You will both be MUCH happier in the long run.
    #23
  4. ER70S-2

    ER70S-2 Long timer

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    :nod
    #24
  5. Hesaid

    Hesaid Long timer

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    No, no link ordered yet. Mainly, we've still got time before she'll be back on the bike, so no real hurry. Been busy with the holidays. And we also figured she should at least try sitting on it with the new seat once before we take the next step. Orthopedist says she can start bearing weight on it now, so I figure this weekend we'll have it out of the garage (have to move them anyway to get to Christmas), and she can try sitting on it.

    Yes, bike was lowered by the book. It was a challenge, as the dealer had no idea it was possible, but we finally made it happen. Complete with new sidestand and warning sticker, and notation in the manual about different amount of fork oil. Plus, with two bikes it's easy to compare. I had to go through the service manual and have them print it out. Once they figured it all out, they were happy to learn that this was possible, apparently they never read the book...

    MV
    #25
  6. greer

    greer Long timer

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    I don't mean to preach and nag, but here's the website with the links:

    http://burkhartcycle.com/store/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=5&products_id=162


    Install the links, slide the forks, THEN have her sit on the bike in the garage to get the feel of things while her wrist continues to heal. Listen to me.

    Sarah



    #26
  7. Kommando

    Kommando Long timer

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    Sometimes the best thing you can do when fighting the DR from going over is to just get away from it. I've pitched it one way and rolled the other. I've pushed the handlebars under me as the front end plowed sideways in the mud and I hit the ground running. There are many times you REALLY don't want to try any harder to save it from going down. You could hurt yourself...hernia, hyper-extension, strained muscles, getting catapulted by 367lb of momentum tossing itself to the ground, etc. Just let it go. Hit the killswitch once it drops. It's pretty easy to pick up once you step off of it and plant your butt against the seat to lift it with your legs....especially if somebody else is helping.

    Make sure to armor it up...skid, sidecase covers, and real handguards. Drill your levers, leave their clamps loose enough that the levers rotate if slammed, and zip-tie spares to your frame (under the side plastics). You may also want to swap your rear signals for offroading, to signals that don't protrude, or to signals that are super flexy. Make sure to UNPLUG them, instead of cutting. Cyclegear sells wiring adapters to make most signals fit the DR harness.
    #27
  8. Hesaid

    Hesaid Long timer

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    Don't suppose you have a link to somewhere that has the links in stock?

    Over this last weekend we got the bikes out of the garage (as well as boxes of Christmas stuff...) and she got a chance to sit on her bike and see how the new seat felt, both as a seat, and as far as a different height. The seat was a step in the right direction, but I'm not quite sure it offers an extra inch lower as Suzuki claims. No matter, we spent some time with a tape measure and some weight, bouncing and moving and measuring, and were able to get an idea of which links to order. It does look like we'll only be going an inch. Could possibly do an inch and a half if those were the only links we could find, but if we've got a choice, we'll go for an inch.

    Which takes us back to the beginning of this post...

    Know a good place to buy links?

    I'll be doing some looking on my own, but if someone has a good place to recommend, I'm listening.

    MV
    #28
  9. greer

    greer Long timer

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    Give him a call, he made up a set for my husband's KLR in a day.

    Sarah
    #29
  10. greer

    greer Long timer

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  11. Hesaid

    Hesaid Long timer

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    Ok, now you're creeping me out a little...

    It's like you're looking over my shoulder at the other windows I have open. I'll try calling, if they really are that type of outfit that can respond to customers, I'd really like to do business with them. I am interested in Soupy's adjustable links, they cost more, but I think it's easy to see why. They might be good for the learning curve, and continued uses as racks, bags, and gear are added. We'll be talking it over, in the meanwhile, I will call Burkhart guy and see what he can do as well. Is anyone using Soupy's? Guess I'll go search.

    Thanks for the input.

    MV
    #31
  12. High Country Herb

    High Country Herb Adventure Connoiseur

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    I love the his & hers threads. It is good to see couples sharing hobbies. My wife doesn't ride pavement, but loves to share motorcycling with me.

    It sounds like you are sticking with the DR's for now. Nothing wrong with that, as they are fine all-around bikes. Someone else mentioned, and I agree, that adding a few teeth to the rear sprocket will make them easier to ride. They'll be less likely to stall, and roll smoother at low speeds. Even if you lose 10 mph of top speed, they'll still be great for exploring California. There are many many miles of forest service roads up here in the Sierra, and putting around on a DR is probably the best way to travel them.

    I ride an '83 XL600 off road, which is somewhat similar to your DR's. A dual sport that size is ideal for most secondary roads and dirt roads. The weight of a 600 can be tiresome on the single track, though, so I would avoid that until jumping curbs is second nature. Let me know if you want some trail suggestions in the Central Sierra, I'd be happy to tell you or show you.
    #32
  13. greer

    greer Long timer

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    Hope the bike and wrist are coming right along!

    Sarah
    #33
  14. buls4evr

    buls4evr No Marks....

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    Got quiet...... Divorce lawyer? 2 DR650s for sale?:deal
    #34
  15. Shesaid

    Shesaid Been here awhile

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    LOL... I am supposed to assure everyone that our bikes are NOT for sale! Wouldn't make sense to get a divorce lawyer seeing as how I refuse to marry Hesaid all legal-like. LONG stories that I will be happy to tell around a campfire with a beer in my hand if anyone ever wants to hear them.

    For the most part, you are always sure to hear more and more often from Hesaid than from me. I am active on several Internet forums related to my career (yeah, I know, it's total news to most folks that there's more to do doing nails than just sitting around doing nails all day... but I like to set the curve a little higher in most things I do. Most. This motorcycling thing didn't exactly do my image any favors!) so I just don't have much time to keep up with y'all.

    Also, this forum is CRAZY! Hesaid keeps sending me links to threads about dutch oven cooking and lightweight motorcylce tents and BELIEVE ME I have input on those subjects! I just have don't have time to keep up with them!

    We plan to get back on the bikes this weekend, nothing too adventurous but my orthopedist has only recentely (and quite reluctantly) agreed that I could get back on the bike at all!

    Many adventures and hilarious Hesaid/Shesaid posts will ensue! Meanwhile... if you want a great taste of past adventures, I think I managed to fill out my profile properly and there should be a link to my blog-- look up all the canoeing posts. I can't wait to start writing biking posts too!

    (Also, VERY Excited about the promise of lowering link! 1 more inch, that's all I ask! :wink: )
    #35
  16. Hesaid

    Hesaid Long timer

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    Just been busy, Holidays and all.

    And work. I keep having to do that.

    And computer failures around the house (Merry Christmas from Dell, a brand new, new computer!).

    But all that aside, since no one seems to have a reason why not to, it looks like I'll be ordering Soupy's adjustable links.

    And then a jacket.

    And some boots.

    And it just goes on...

    MV
    #36
  17. greer

    greer Long timer

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    There you go. Good to hear from you two.

    Sarah
    #37
  18. Shesaid

    Shesaid Been here awhile

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    Hey Sarah, have to say thanks bunches for the info on the lowering link. It worked out great and I'm feeling much better on the bike now!
    #38
  19. focallength

    focallength Long timer

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    Take the MSF dirt bike school, both of you. Theyll teach you on 250s, then take what you learned and ride, ride, ride. Dont do anything your not comfortable with. That being said you only get better by going outside of your comfort zone, just do it gradually.
    Learn the basics like speed is your friend, how to stop, how and when to use which brake, etc...get comfortable loosing traction, one of the best skills to learn is locking the rear tire, get used to the feeling now. Stuff like that, find a good coach.

    March is the noob rally in death valley, if youre up to it attend.
    #39
  20. ER70S-2

    ER70S-2 Long timer

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    Dirt riding is challenging enough, I suggest a full knobby front tire. :nod A new rider will never over-ride a DOT knobby on the street. If they do, they should find another hobby. :deal
    #40