Torque wrench with 1/4" to 3/8" adapter

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by bobframe, Aug 16, 2013.

  1. bobframe

    bobframe Been here awhile

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    I need to use my 1/4" torque wrench in a situation that requires 11Nm of torque. My wrench's range is from 6-32Nm...so it is my preferred tool since my 3/8" torque wrench's dial begins at 20Nm. I am using it to tighten an oil filter and the oil filter wrench requires either a 3/8" square drive or a 19mm socket, which I only have in 3/8". However, I do have a 1/4" to 3/8" adapter that would allow me to use the 1/4" torque wrench.

    Anyone see a problem using a 1/4" torque wrench with such an adapter? Obviously the parts all connect and work...but any reason to doubt the wrench's accuracy with such a setup?

    Thanks!
    #1
  2. emti

    emti Been here awhile

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    Others may correct me but the only issue I can think of is that if the adapter is of a significant length there would be a loss of torque due to torsional losses? Maybe.... Its been a while. I believe there is a formula to correct the loss? emti
    #2
  3. KeithinSC

    KeithinSC Long timer

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    Torsional loses due to twisting of the adapter would be negligible/non-existent at 11 N-m. That is barely a 'two finger' torque:D

    There is noting to worry about using an adapter, we use them all the time and have no calibration issues.
    #3
  4. ZEmann

    ZEmann want to be riding

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    non issue
    agreed
    #4
  5. anotherguy

    anotherguy Long timer

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    Yeah use it without worry.
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  6. Imachimper

    Imachimper Newer than Noob

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  7. Beezer

    Beezer Long timer

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    n o... it's the law...Newton's 3rd law, don't matter how long an extension is in the same plane, it does matter if the lever arm is changed though. Imachimper covered that
    #7
  8. bobframe

    bobframe Been here awhile

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    Thanks guys!
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  9. damurph

    damurph Cold Adventurer

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    I know I am not as fussy as some but it is an oil filter. Tens of thousands are put on daily and I have personally put on hundreds ....BY HAND.
    Don't overdo it on the thinking or the torqueing.
    #9
  10. pelvis_98

    pelvis_98 Havin A Time

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    I agree.

    Putting on a oil filter doesn't have the that perfect a torque. Lots of people tend to over tighten them and then have a hard time getting them off.
    #10
  11. DrDaytona

    DrDaytona Been here awhile

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    Some filters aren't accessible by hand....in which case, I always recommend people use a torque wrench. Mostly because people do tend to get over zealous and tighten the crap out of them.
    #11
  12. damurph

    damurph Cold Adventurer

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    And I agree that people do just this.
    Put your oil filter socket onto a 3/8 wratchet and grab it by the head of the wratchet. Spin. When you feel any resistance go a shade further and it is on.
    By all means torque every nut and bolt to your hearts content. What procedure do you use on the road??? Sometimes you just have to get a feel for things.
    #12
  13. bobframe

    bobframe Been here awhile

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    Completely agree and, in this case, I understand that hand tightening would work fine. But I have a new torque wrench and want an excuse to use it. The wrench's instructions had several warnings about using handle extensions and adapters and it was written in "pig-English"...hard to understand. Just wanted to understand the do's and don'ts of adapters. Thanks for all the help.
    #13
  14. Beezer

    Beezer Long timer

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    does it have a floating handle? some beam type wrenches do... the handle pivots on a pin. if so, then the handle has to float during the check... if one of the ends contacts the beam it will be inaccurate. on the other types with solid handles it doesn't matter how you hold it. just an fyi
    #14
  15. bobframe

    bobframe Been here awhile

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    It does not, but thanks for the info. Mine have solid handles like a "normal" ratchet wrench.
    #15
  16. Jetmakerbrit

    Jetmakerbrit Cranky Flier

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    Flogging a dead horse here but as previous responses concurred, adaptor effect on accuracy is a non-issue. It does however increase the chances of breaking the 1/4" wrench head - especially if the click is missed (seen this done). Just be careful not to be over-zealous and exceed the specified torque.
    #16
  17. Z50R

    Z50R Not lost yet

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    The length of the adapter only matters in a dynamic situation like an impact wrench. Since every action has an equal and opposite reaction, a twist in one end of the bar must be accounted for with an equal and opposite twist on the other end. A bar under torsion acts as a spring: this means that it can store energy and thus a large force for a short duration can be balanced by a small force for a long duration. A longer or more slender bar will have a lower spring constant and therefore be less stiff and more "springy".

    If you are using a long extension for a critical torque operation, be sure to hold the wrench at the specified torque until the socket stops moving. For any real life application this will be less than a second.
    #17
  18. Terry

    Terry Long timer

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    I thought I was the only person around that actually used a torque wrench on the oil fil on my GS! I do because I can. I have the torque wrench and the filter tool. I can't do it 'by hand' since it is in a recess. Obviously I could just use a ratchet, but I figure as long as I am using a ratchet, why not use my torque wrench?
    On all other vehicles I work on, I do it by hand. Never had a problem either way.
    But one think I have noticed lately is that on my GS (1150), the rubber ring on the filter sticks on the bike insted of coming off with the old filter. Seems like the last several filter changes have gone this way, while it never happened to me before. So I suspect the filters are not grabbing the rubber ring as well as they used to. No big deal. Just remember to look for it.

    Terry
    #18