Total Control ARC (By Lee Parks)

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by outlaws justice, Mar 2, 2011.

  1. outlaws justice

    outlaws justice Long timer

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    I did some searches and did not come up with much. I was wondering how many people here have taken the Total Control Advanced Riding Clinic? www.totalcontroltraining.net I also would like some thoughts from those who have. (I have been teaching it since 2006) I have traveled all over to teach, or help teach the class, from Washington and California to N.C., Tenn, and GA. to Maryland, N.Y. and N.H.

    The Class was a real eye opener for me, especially being an MSF instructor that I saw the need for such training and got involved. Now when I have a free weekend or vacation time I use it to travel and teach where needed and requested when I can.

    We have Classes scheduled for June 3rd or June 4th (Your choice) for Nashville Tenn. If you are interested in taking one you can sign up here. http://www.nashvilleriders.com/index.php/total-control-registration-june-2011
    #1
  2. Brit in SF

    Brit in SF Been here awhile

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    I have not taken the class but thinking of signing up for the next one in San Mateo that's in a month or so away.

    I want to be a better rider, just not sure this is the right class. Most of the pictures show people hanging off the bike like they are on a race track. My street riding is a little more conservative.

    Maybe you could help me understand the curriculum and what I can expect to learn.

    Thanks!
    #2
  3. outlaws justice

    outlaws justice Long timer

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    First I would say to look at what others have to say about the class (other students) here is a thread from the SV forums

    http://forum.svrider.com/showthread.php?t=98234

    And here is one from the writer at Web bike world

    http://www.webbikeworld.com/motorcycle-training/total-control/advanced-riding-clinic.htm

    I can say I never rode a sport bike before taking the class, (I ride a lot of different bikes) but it really transformed my riding and took me to a whole new level of riding, trust in my bike etc.
    #3
  4. RMZMZM

    RMZMZM Not adventurous

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    Highly, Highly recommend!!

    I took the course in Aug '09 and have greatly increased my confidence and skill. I hope to get in a skills day this summer.

    "I want to be a better rider, just not sure this is the right class. Most of the pictures show people hanging off the bike like they are on a race track. My street riding is a little more conservative." - Brit in SF

    Don't let the hanging off the bike thing detour you. I thought the same thing when I took the class, and for several weeks afterward I wondered if it really applied to conservative street riding. In spite of those thoughts I practiced some of the skills anyways.

    What a difference it made! The real value is in the confidence you gain from discovering how far from the real limits of the machine most of us usually ride. Knowing that I have the ability to "snap" the handlebar and "flop" the bike over quickly into a much steeper lean than I do normally allows me to relax more, keep my eyes and focus further ahead, and operate more smoothly (and yes I do go to a parking lot occasionally to practice these techniques)
    #4
  5. LuciferMutt

    LuciferMutt Rides slow bike slow

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    I haven't taken his class but I read his book several times. The key thing I think you are going to take away is an ability to control your machine with much more precision and much greater confidence which will enable you to ride more safely on the street. No you don't have to drag knee and probably won't even have to in the class but many of the concepts can be used to a less extreme degree to provide better cornering traction and clearance which are hugely important in street riding.

    I think he teaches people how to ride fast so they don't have to...if that makes any sense. I guess I mean that if you know how to ride fast safely and properly with the correct body positioning and correct inputs, then riding at a street pace should be much safer for you since you will have increased your personal limits.
    #5
  6. fung

    fung Been here awhile

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    Get the book, read it. And take the class. I sure got slot out of it.
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  7. outlaws justice

    outlaws justice Long timer

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    The Book is great, and a must read, I read it before I took the class as well, and it was what made me look deeper into my own skills and realize there was a lot I did not know, A LOT!

    The Class is not about dragging a knee, is that possible? Yes, is it necessary, no. The class is about many aspects of riding from the mental aspect to the physical aspect. From tires and suspension to body position and line selection.

    It will help you ride safer and better!
    #7
  8. coppertop

    coppertop occasional meanderthal

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    There was a LOT of information doled out over the course of the day. I would have liked more time practicing the techniques, but that was more a matter of the sheer number of things being taught. The Total Control class covered easily more than a dozen different actions relating to bike control, and you practice them a few times each. In contrast, American Supercamp seems to cover maybe fewer distinct actions, but you are drilling on those few things over and over for two days. I came out of Supercamp feeling like I had more of a handle on the skill I was trying to develop. I came out of the Total Control class with a mental laundry list of things to practice to improve my riding. The upside for Total Control is, you can practice those techniques every time you get on the bike. It's a little bit harder to do the Supercamp thing on my morning commute.
    #8
  9. wiseblood

    wiseblood Hall Monitor

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    Yup!

    [​IMG]


    I took it w/ Christine Firehock at DCCC near Poughkeepsie, NY. Picture above was from last year, around this time.

    I had read the book a couple times, so I was familiar with the basic principles. However, the class really helped master some techniques which are better understood "physically" such as trail-braking.

    The day I took the class was pouring down rain, which was a real bummer. Nonetheless, we had fun on the range. Nobody dropped a bike, and by the end of the day I had gained some useful skills which I use EVERY day, as well as some skills which helped me enjoy my first track day, done later that year. :ricky :D

    Jesse
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  10. gmiguy

    gmiguy You rode a what to where?

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    I would like to take a motorcycle skills class this year, and have been seriously considering this one.

    The only thing that puts me off is that I see people occasionally saying that they see it as a more advanced continuation of the MSF classes, which I thought were a dreadful waste of time and money.

    Good to see that other folks think highly of it. Any idea why people would compare it to the MSF? I hope it's quite different from that.
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  11. wiseblood

    wiseblood Hall Monitor

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    I do not think this is a "more advanced" MSF course. That might be the ERC, but not Total Control.

    A better description: Total Control ARC is a class which is somewhere between street riding and track riding techniques.

    MSF (I've taken the BRC) focuses on minimum safety, IMHO. Basics, like counter-steering, basic braking, and LOW speed body positioning. Basically, the essentials you need to survive your first year or two riding.

    TC-ARC focuses on:

    * Body positioning for cornering at speed
    * Trail braking: What is it, and why you *will* use it every day, every time you apply your brakes. (Yes, you will. I do!)
    * Vision, w/r/t cornering at speed.
    * Psychology of riding, and how it effects your riding

    If you stay until the end, there's a bit in the class about suspension set-up. No MSF class touches upon that.


    All in all, I think it's a very good class, particularly if you have any desire to try out the track. Even if you don't, the lessons will make you a much better rider.

    Jesse
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  12. outlaws justice

    outlaws justice Long timer

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    Glad to hear that those posting up have had a good experiance, Sad to see that many who have not taken the class think it is a racing class. Far from a racing class, and from personal experiance this class was the best thing I did for my riding bar none in my entire riding history!

    I am also surprised so few members here have taken this class.
    #12
  13. Brit in SF

    Brit in SF Been here awhile

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    I am glad I posted and it's nice to hear that the class is not as racing oriented as I has feared. I will check the schedule and see if I can make it.
    #13
  14. anotherguy

    anotherguy Long timer

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    Been riding and racing for 40+ years. Have not taken the Parks course but have read the book. Got some useful things from that. Well written and illustrated with a logical progression.

    On the "I'm not racing" viewpoint. I have taken many off road training/racing schools and everything I learned there transfers to riding a motorcycle. Anywhere,anyhow. Being comfortable and in control of a sliding,bouncing squirrelly motorcycle goes a long way to understanding what needs to be done to ride at the edge. And trying to avoid that idiot in the truck that's trying to kill you is most certainly "on the edge".
    #14
  15. garandman

    garandman Wandering Minstrel

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    I've taken the ARC and ARC II course. I thought both terrific.
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  16. PT Rider

    PT Rider Been here awhile

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  17. wiseblood

    wiseblood Hall Monitor

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    What did you think of ARC2, specifically?
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  18. garandman

    garandman Wandering Minstrel

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    Good refresher of I, plus more advanced drills and a lot of discussion about suspension setup.

    There is also a Refresher offered at some venues.
    #18
  19. rdwalker

    rdwalker Long timer

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    I usually try to participate in some training at least once a year - preferably in the spring, to get the cobwebs out.

    Over the years, I have done the MSF ERC, of course, as well as a Pridmore track school, BMW school and Lee Parks ARC.

    If you have the opportunity, I highly recommend the ARC: there is a lot of training for the money. It it probably the least expensive training (outside of MSF). A the others mentioned, it concentrates on handling and turning the bike. I have done both levels, probably 4 times by now. Highly recommended.
    #19
  20. outlaws justice

    outlaws justice Long timer

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    4 Times, Where do you take it?
    #20