Total Control ARC (By Lee Parks)

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by outlaws justice, Mar 2, 2011.

  1. rickrwh

    rickrwh Been here awhile

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    KLRs ALWAYS get a mention. :evil

    Especially here.

    Glad you enjoyed the class!
  2. outlaws justice

    outlaws justice Long timer

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    Some folks have sent me messages about classes, so I thought I would mention if you want to look at the web site www.totalcontroltraining.net you can view the schedule, I am sure it will grow over the winter.
  3. Am.E

    Am.E Been here awhile

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    Bump...

    I'm signed up to take this class for the first time next weekend, and really looking forward to it.

    However, I have two bikes, and am not sure which to take (I know, I know, world's smallest violin, first world problems....), so I'm polling the crowd:

    One is a 2012 Ducati Monster. Learning to get more out of this bike is a big reason I'd like to take this class. However, the Monster is not the friendliest at parking lot speeds: first gear is still very tall (even after going to a smaller front sprocket), fueling at low rpm is TERRIBLE, making the bike run roughly at low rpm, and the throttle is very snatchy or on/off at low rpm. Also, the amount of steering lock is not great. All of this makes the bike difficult to ride at parking lot speeds in small circles.

    Contrast to my Honda CRF230L dualsport. Easy to ride slow (low first gear, smooth running, will tractor as smoothly as you want all the way down to zero.) Lots of steering angle. Light. Don't care a bit if I drop it. I've been practicing some parking lot figure 8 stuff, and the CRF has allowed me to learn much more, and its easier to push the limits.

    I'm concerned if I take the Monster that I will not get as much from the class. But then again, maybe taking it on the Monster is exactly what I need.

    which bike would you take? Is the crf dual sport an appropriate bike for this? Does it make sense to take the class on the CRF, and then practice on the Monster on my own time later?
  4. viajero

    viajero Too old to be a nOOb

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    I say take the Monster. Explain its shortcomings to the instructors and ask for help in overcoming them. They might just have some good techniques for you to try.

    Otherwise, sell it and get something more user friendly.
  5. beck49

    beck49 Been here awhile

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    The OP is in an interesting position. I took both TCARC classes and certainly benefited from them. I had a Tiger 1050 that can be very snatchy at low speed. The class will probably be a lot easier with the dual sport, but I think the lessons will apply more to when you ride the Monster. Also the circles aren't that small. The challenge is being able to quickly get up to speed and then hold a constant throttle while executing what you've learned. Keep in mind that it's also not just about learning the techniques you use in the circles. They will cover suspension as well. Lee was at both of my classes and you can get very direct advice about the suspension on your own bike. This would again probably argue in favor of the Monster. Good luck.
  6. DiamondDan

    DiamondDan Adventurer

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    I just did the ARC1 here n IL on an F800R, which also has a really snatchy throttle at low speeds. Did it make the maneuvers more difficult? Probably, but it's important to remember that you are learning techniques, not mastering the, at the ARC1. I'll do a skills day or two to really work on getting these maneuvers up to a standard I'm happy with on my bike.

    I'n your shoes, I'd use the monster.
  7. wiseblood

    wiseblood Hall Monitor

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    One of the lessons they teach in the class is maintaining your RPMs in the level above where the "snatch" kicks in. So, going with the Monster will give you another opportunity to learn.

    Sounds like you have already made your decision. :deal
  8. Am.E

    Am.E Been here awhile

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    Thanks for the responses! Good points all...

    Eh, no bike is "perfect." Despite its faults, the Monster is a really excellent, fun "little" bike. I do think the Monster rewards higher skill with higher performance in a way that a bike that is "easier" to ride cannot. (Won't completely de-rail the thread with this, but different strokes for different folks, most of the time, the Monster is a hoot)


    This probably makes all the difference, and decreases my concern a lot.

    Yeah, I was leaning pretty hard that way anyway, but I was curious what others would do (especially those who had taken the class). As long as my new rear tire comes in on time, I'll take the Monster. I'll definitely report back to this thread with my opinion after the class in case anyone is interested.

    Cross your fingers for good weather, I get to go on a 300 mi moto trip this Friday!:D
  9. rickrwh

    rickrwh Been here awhile

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    I'll chime in here. I'd take the Monster. My wife has a 696 and I've taught on it a couple times and like you said, it's a hoot.
  10. Am.E

    Am.E Been here awhile

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    So the verdict is that the Monster is a great bike to take to total control.

    Also, a big thumbs up for this class.:clap This was my first time taking total control, and it was definitely worth it for me (if only to fix the bad habits I didn’t know I had). I had fun, and learned a few things to work on. I gained a bit of knowledge, but the biggest value was getting to practice some fundamentals in front of the instructors. I wasn’t the only one with a gap between what I thought I was doing, and what I was actually doing. Reading a book and watching others gives the knowledge of what to do, but having knowledgeable instructors correct you and show you photographic evidence that you aren’t actually doing what you think you are is worth the price of the class. Highly recommended!

    The concerns about the Monster being difficult at low speeds were totally unfounded for this class. Yes, the class is held in a parking lot, but the drills are plenty fast enough to avoid the difficulty at very low speeds. I had been concerned because I have been practicing very small u-turns and circles (like inside a 24 ft circle, which bumps up against full lock on the Monster), and am still having some trouble. This class addresses cornering at road speeds, and the 40 ft circles were plenty big enough (especially since they wanted you to stay far enough away from the cones to see the whole circle at all times). The only difference is that some people did some of the drills in 2nd gear, but I would do them in first at roughly the same speed.

    If the crf230 was my only bike, it would have been fine to take to this class. However, since I had a choice, the Monster is definitely better.
  11. F16Viper68

    F16Viper68 Trapped in the Sandbox!

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