Trading my KLR for a Burgman 400....another talk me out of it thread

Discussion in 'Battle Scooters' started by doogiepooch, Nov 5, 2012.

  1. chazbird

    chazbird Long timer

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    Comfort:

    KLR (I've owned one) = masochist
    Maxi Scooter = hedonist

    If you find the KLR "comfortable" then any other bike that others think comfortable, like a maxi scooter, will not register with you, so might as well keep the KLR.
    Weather/wind protection = maxi scooter
    Road handling = Maxi Scooter
    Braking = Maxi scooter
    Dirt roads/ potholes: KLR
    Range: KLR
    Fuel mileage same or better than a KLR.
    Open roads cruising speed = Maxi Scooter (I ride 70-75 on a 250 semi-maxi scooter all the time, its not frenetic like the KLR is starting to become at this speed and a 500cc-650cc maxi would so outclass a KLR)
    Two up = maxi scooter
    Carrying capacity = Maxi scooter (unless you put Jesse bags on a KLR)
    Town riding = any maxi scooter - its just a breeze.

    For me, (Piaggio BV250, which is a compact maxi, I guess) I've not found the maintenance costs and consumables to be out of line with a KLR.
    #21
  2. doogiepooch

    doogiepooch Been here awhile

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    I've watched some of his video's on youtube. He did 1,100 miles in 18 hrs from somewhere in FL to somewhere in TX. He as eating and drinking while riding and looked insanely relaxed the whole trip. :lol3

    I won't say that I think the KLR is the most comfortable thing out there. I can live with it on long days, I guess is about the best way to sum it up. I have Hwy pegs so I can switch legs postions, have a Russel Day long copy custom seat, heated grips and a new windscreen. Plus the ability to stand, that one thing I think I'll miss but the only reason to stand aside from the fun of it, is if your butt is killing you. But even without riding one I'm totally agreeing with you, I think it will knock the KLR out of the park. I'm also hoping to entice the Mrs, who has MS, back into riding. A big comfy seat and a nice backrest on a smooth machine will do the trick.

    A couple folks have brought up potential maintenance costs and frequency as a deturrant. One thing I'd like to mention.....while the KLR is a dead simple bike with low maint. costs, for myself anyway, it takes $1,000 worth of add ons to make it a good bike. It's so top heavy, crash bars are a must, toss in some lever guards and stronger bars for bomb proof drop insurance, add a seat, a windscreen etc and that still leaves you with a bike with no storage. The Burgman has locking storage built in. The cheapest pannier system for a KLR is roughly $650 and that only gets you a big stainless box. Nice looking ones like the Trax boxes or other and you've dropped $1,000. While I'm not suggesting you can compare a KLR to a Burgman but for someone interested in stepping from one to the other, costs of add on's to the KLR could and should be considered as big plusses in the Burgman column.
    #22
  3. Racerrrx

    Racerrrx Been here awhile

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    Not trying to upset your marital bliss, but this makes zero sense. $150/month for 60 months vs $3000 ONCE. Can't see how that's fiscally sound to anyone. If you MUST make payments, just take out a personal loan for the $3K, no need to go through a dealer.
    #23
  4. Chris618

    Chris618 Been here awhile

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    I bought an 08 Burgman 400 for my wife and find it to be the first bike I go to when I go out for a ride. It is so easy and relaxing to ride, no shifting, no clutch to hold in at a light, pulls my 210lbs at 85mph, gets 60mpg and can cruise highway all day. My wife rode it from NY to RI no issues, then we rode two up all weekend, carries leftovers from dinner, holds jackets, two helmets. I highly recomend one. I liked the 400 over the 650 I rode, the 650 felt heavier. I added Givi windshield and Dr Pulley slider clutch weights 18grams to lower highway rpm slightly.
    Our garage has: Super Tenere, XR650R, 400exc, 950SM, Monster 695 and xt225. The Burgman still is my first choice when going out to dinner or for a cruise. Go try one out!
    #24
  5. JerryH

    JerryH Banned

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    I personally would avoid the Burgman 650. It is almost as heavy as a 1500 Goldwing, with less than half the displacement, and believe it or not, is actually harder to handle. I'm 53, with severe arthritis, and was looking for an easier to manage touring bike than the Goldwing. I did not find it among the maxi scooters, except for possibly the Piaggio BV500. My Goldwing (without floorboards) easily allows me to put both feet solidly on the ground, which I could not do on most of the maxi scooters. I also didn't like the small wheels on such large heavy bikes.

    As for cruisers, they are not what they used to be. My beloved Vulcan 750 is a 1985 design, and is the most comfortable bike I have ever had. It is plenty fast, light enough to handle easily, gets good mileage, and can be loaded down with enough stuff for a 2 week trip. Granted, it is not your typical late model cruiser. But even todays cruisers are more comfortable than any sport bike or even sport touring bikes.I avoid bikes where you have to support any of your weight with your arms. The VTX1300 is a fairly comfortable cruiser. So is the Yamaha Royal Star. I actually prefer standard bikes, and will probably eventually replace the Vulcan with a Triumph Bonneville, when it wears out. It is the only full sized standard sold in the U.S. unless Honda has something under one of those tarps.

    As for my aversion to ABS, I started riding at age 8, in 1967. Since age 16, I have owned 41 bikes. None of them had ABS, nor did they need it. Braking is something the rider is supposed to do. It is something you practice over and over, and get better and better at. I don't want a computer controlling MY motorcycle. As the rider, that is MY job. Half a million miles in 36 years, and no accidents. I must be doing something right.
    #25
  6. doogiepooch

    doogiepooch Been here awhile

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    #1 - I don't really want a $3,000 scooter. I buy new, because I like to know everything that's been done to something and although the KLR isn't a good example, when I buy new, I keep that new thing for years to get my money's worth.
    #2 - I won't think twice about $150 a month. The Mrs pressuring me to get that $3000 back in savings....uh I notice that.
    #3 - I basically Dave Ramsey everything. I don't have a car payment, credit card debt, blah blah blah. So no way do I owe 60 months, I'd never finance anything that long, but at 3% interest I'll finace a couple grand here and there.

    Cool to know you have all those choices and still pick the Burgman.
    #26
  7. tastroman

    tastroman Long timer

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    Something you may not have taken into consideration is how much more user friendly a scooter is around town. The built in storage capacity, weather protection and small wheels make it an excellent short distance ride. If you get it you will find yourself grocery shopping, commuting, and errand running on it. Plus, the added weather protection will extend your riding season. So if you can live with it as a long distance hauler, you are going to love it around town.

    I do think you need to spend some serious saddle time on the scooter as it sits way different than your KLR. I mean night and day different. Some love, some hate the maxi seating position so if you plan on big miles, you don't want to have regrets.

    I've got of 250cc maxi you are welcome to try for a extended ride if you like. It's not comparable to the Burgman in the engine department but it sits somewhat similarly so you could get an idea if you like the riding position. PM me if you are interested.
    #27
  8. Ken K

    Ken K Adventurer

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    All I can say is I don't regret the change at all!! I had a KRL traded that in on a sportster - sold that didn't like the ride - got caught up in the harley thing. Then bought a used KTM 950 Adventer - got tired of that - Liked the bike but it was difficult to service, so I looked at a scooter - bike friend suggest the Burgman, found out a buddy had one - went and looked at a left over 2011 in September and traded my KTM even up for it. Really enjoy the Burgman great ride nibble, agile and it goes. Drove it back from the dealership at 65mph no problems what so ever. Great on the highway - wonderful on secondary roads and the back roads the weather protection is great. Added a trunk unit - I can go anywhere with the storage capacity it has, also being automatic took a little adjustment. Put 2500 miles on it since mid-September. Don't regret the change at all - love the MPG. My only regret is that I am getting ready to put it away for the winter. Pull the trigger make the move - it's still two wheels and you will smile from ear to ear.
    #28
  9. soboy

    soboy Long timer

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    I've been riding for 40 years. Last year, I sold my DR650 and my Shadow 750 and bought a Yamaha Tmax. Now that I've had the Tmax for over a year, here are my observations: If you like to ride distances and enjoy the twisties, a maxiscooter is a much better street bike than a cruiser. Way more cornering clearance, lots of built in storage, great wind protection and I find the Tmax much more comfortable over distances. A good dual sport handles well on the street, but the Tmax still outcorners a d/s and has all the other benefits I just listed. What I miss about the DR650 is the plush ride on bad pavement and the ability to go off road, in these two areas, it has the maxi beat. BTW, I have ridden both the KLR and the Burgman 400 and the Burger is much nicer on the street.
    #29
  10. HandKPhil

    HandKPhil Been here awhile

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    Amen to this. I bought an '09 Majesty, thinking it would be a better long-distance mount than my KLR250. Well that sure didn't turn out to be true. The "feet forward" position of the Majesty just killed my back after anything more than an hour long ride. The Majesty's rear suspension was too harsh for me as well. Sold the Majesty after a year and am now looking seriously at an "Italian" KLR. (a Husqvarna TR650) (...and I'll be keeping my two KLR250's too)
    #30
  11. chazbird

    chazbird Long timer

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    Definitely if seating position is a concern sit on (or ride) all the potential maxi-scooters you can. My Piaggio has a wide range of foot positions. Feet forward, which, like many have posted, I really don't care for, to flat and even somewhat semi-rearset, sort of like a SV650, not ideal for touring but better than feat forward, especially when you are riding "spiritied" in the curves/hills. Its nice to actually have, at least on the Piaggio's (250's 350 and maybe the 500's) the ability to readily move your foot/leg position.
    #31
  12. John Bentall

    John Bentall Been here awhile

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    Surely the difference is very roughly this....

    KLR = cowboy, the wide open range, challenge of the Wild West, smoking a Marlboro in the saddle.
    Mini Scooter (<250cc) = Urban Mobility, practicality, drinking a coffee and meeting friends
    Maxi-Scooter (>250cc) = Mini Scooter + long distance cruising.

    You just have to decide where you are in your life.......
    #32
  13. oldxr

    oldxr Long timer

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    Motorcycles are like tools-you have to pick the best 1 for the job.Kind of like women-sometimes the different looking ones ride better.
    #33
  14. cbolling

    cbolling Here...Hold my Beer.

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    :lol3
    #34
  15. emmettken

    emmettken Long timer

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    I went from this [​IMG] to this [​IMG] Love the Burgman. Sometimes I really miss the KLR,my body needed something more comfortable.
    #35
  16. SPOFF

    SPOFF Been here awhile

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    This won't be too helpful, but I bought a Honda PCX 125 this spring and haven't ridden my KLR since. (I only rode the Valkyrie three times.) But I was laid up the entire summer after emergency eye surgery. So I spent the riding season riding a rocking chair in front of my computer :cry If at all possible, I'd keep the KLR for winter and ride the Burgman all summer. Otherwise go with the Burgman. The auto transmission spoils you fast.
    #36
  17. topless

    topless Been here awhile

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    I stepped up to the Burgman when Suzuki offered 0% for 60 months financing.
    As far as comfort, I bought a part off eBay that raised the stock butt pad 4" and it keeps the adjustment. The seller is called 2brothersperfromacejr. They make it and it is an easy install. By keeping the curved support, it hits me just under the rib cage and is very comfortable.
    #37
  18. TomN

    TomN Long timer

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    I've owned a KLR and a 400 Burgman. They were pretty close on the highway speed wise, the Burgman having much better wind protection. Neither is that good at high speeds, I always felt like I needed more power till I got a VStrom. Burgman was great for riding to work but not very good on twisty back roads, did not have much suspension travel, not much grunt ou of the corners. Did not feel very fast with the CVT but did ok.
    #38
  19. cdwise

    cdwise Long timer

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    My brother has a KLR 650 and I rode with him a few times while I had the Burgman 400. One ride with both him and my other brother on his BMW 1200R they put me in the lead because I had the "little" bike. After awhile I had to drop my speed because the cross winds were affecting the one on the KLR much worse than either me or the one on the BMW. Later my brother on the BMW asked me why I slowed down and I told him I seemed to keep losing Dave (KLR) in my rear view mirror. To be old that "yeah, I had that same problem on the ride up to meet you."

    Okay, that's my fun poke at someone riding a KLR. There are many, many places where the KLR would be the much better choice (speaking as someone who dumped a Burgman on a gravel road, they do not handle well on somewhat lose light to moderately graveled dirt roads) but they are very good on the highway and handle winds well. Acceleration is smooth and you can cruise all day long 70-80 miles per hour and still have grunt in reserve. I've ridden one between Houston and Breckenridge as well as other long 1,000+ mile rides. Care does need to be taken on the throttle or you will find yourself going in the mid 90s without even realizing your going that fast. I'm speaking of 1 up. Nicest thing about the Burgman 400 was taking a 3-4 day trip and having everything fit under the seat. No saddle bags, top case or even a net (one of which is included with the Burgman 400 and it has connection knobs discretely tucked under the tail to attach it without using hooks that could damage paint.

    Negatives for me was the seating position and low speed handling but I'm used to and prefer more upright seating. So we traded in the Burgman for a BV 500 which still isn't quite as good for distance riding as my Scarabeo 500, same engine just different suspension, seat and body panels but the differences in ride is enough to be noticeable. Check around some dealerships will let you rent a used one if they have one in stock. (I've seen a few that don't call it a rental but a conditional sale. You "buy" the bike and can return it within 10 days for a "restocking" fee.) That would give you the opportunity to see if it is one that fits you or not.They are a good scoot and if you don't go off road or do dirt/gravel roads then the Burgman would be better for touring than a KLR but that's just my opinion. I'm a road not off road rider so what do I know.
    #39
  20. TomN

    TomN Long timer

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    I thought the center of gravit on the Burgman was crazy low compaired to KLR, slow speed handling was nice.
    #40