Trail Saws

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by SteveROntario, Apr 29, 2012.

  1. SteveROntario

    SteveROntario Adventurer

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    52
    #1
  2. heliyardsale

    heliyardsale Always looking for Dirt!

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    CNY.. Home of too many Liberials, yuck!
    This!
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    #2
  3. barnyard

    barnyard Verbal tactician Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2007
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    Location:
    central Mn
    I have a Kerber folding saw that I carry in a number plate bag, a compound branch cutter that I carry in a tool holster that is zip-tied to the frame and when needed a simple bow saw that the blade fits in some plumber pipe that is attached to the handlebars.

    I also have a harness that I attach my Stihl trimmer with saw blade attachment. The shaft has pipe insulation zip-tied to it so that it does not hurt anything when it bounces off the handlebars.

    I also carry a gallon of premix for the trimmer on the back of the harness and a fanny pack with tools to change the saw head for a string trimmer head. That fanny pack also has extra string for the trimmer and a t-shirt that I tuck into a baseball cap to keep the deer flies off.

    2-3 weekends a summer, I am a trail clearing machine.
    #3
  4. mookybird

    mookybird Gramps

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    Location:
    Olympic Peninsula, Washington State
    I carry this folder from Stihl and a light hatchet, this time of year they get used a lot exploring the high country roads.



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    #4
  5. Snarky

    Snarky Vodka Infused.

    Joined:
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    When would you prefer to use a saw over a hatchet or machete? I had to clear some mesquite to forge a path to a pond. I used an ax, and was pretty miserable, mesquite tough shit. Would a saw or machete has been better suited to this? Or a combination? I was clearing them down to little stumps to get the truck through, I would imagine via bike one would just have to get enough branches out of the way to push through. I think if I was going out just to perform trail maintenance I'da bring a cheap chain saw at this point, tedious work can get tedious. Though if you only 'occasionally' had to clear something manual labor would probably be the best.

    I carry a multi-tool with a saw attachment, but it's a pretty piss poor excuse for a saw.
    #5
  6. Rodzilla

    Rodzilla Horny as Hell

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    Location:
    Wheat Ridge Colorado
    Stihl chainsaw with mount on front forks for specific work days

    For Spring rides (when expecting a lot of deadfall)

    Silky Sugoi Bit big but it makes short work on most anything under about 8 inches. It WILL open you up fast too. Fackers so sharp I didn't know I had sliced my arm until I noticed my sleeve covered in blood.

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    #6
  7. barnyard

    barnyard Verbal tactician Super Moderator

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    If you had a truck, a chainsaw is a no-brainer.
    #7
  8. sanjoh

    sanjoh Purveyor of Light

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    Mountains of Central Florida:)
    Nice combo for anything <8"

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    Just saw:D a home depot brand (HDX) for < $5 and it is about 6" when folded. Nice and easy packing.
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    #8
  9. team ftb

    team ftb Befuddled Adventurer

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Lost in the jungles of Thailand
    I used to use a Gerber folding saw but it really was not that good at anything more than finger thick.

    Now using a 21" folding Sven saw. Everyone that has used them say they are great and top marks for getting the job done. I've only had to use it once so far on a four inch tree on a hillside singletrack trail and it worked great, much better than the folding Gerber.

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    When disassembled I put some inner tube around the ends so it does not chafe inside my backpack.


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    The avalanche probe pocket of the backpack holds the Sven Saw perfectly.


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    Once seated completly into the pocket the zipper closes and yet keeps it handy. Very happy with the Sven saw.

    best of luck.
    #9
  10. mbabc

    mbabc Curmudgeon trainee

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    #10
  11. K0m4

    K0m4 Been here awhile

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    Location:
    South Caucasus
    Bahco Laplander.

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    Comes with an orange handle too, easy to find at a camp site.
    #11
  12. BigDogAdventures

    BigDogAdventures Fart Letter

    Joined:
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    Location:
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    Yeh------the SVEN saw for me----------I'll never go camping again without it-------------it is much lighter----much less bulky---easier to pack-----and 10 times easier to use than an axe for making a campfire.

    No negatives on the sven saw. I meant to order the shorter version for the bike----but mistakenly ordered the longer one and am glad I did. The longer stroke cuts a bigger log faster.

    My opinions come from light packing on a motorcycle. I've even packed it camping on my bicycle.

    Great idea MTB with the inner tube----I was working on a something to protect the sharp ends---but you did it for me------got lots of old tubes laying around the sickle shed.

    BigDog
    #12
  13. bikerfish

    bikerfish flyfishandride

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    Location:
    western pa
    my svensaw never leaves my saddlebag. it's probable 20 years old and can still make a pile of firewood with little effort, or do a little pruning.
    #13
  14. GPS_Jon

    GPS_Jon The Global Pucker

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  15. HH

    HH Hurricane Harry

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    silky 390
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    #15
  16. ssevy

    ssevy Been here awhile

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    Southern Adirondacks
    svensaw. I bought a wyoming saw ($$) that comes apart in a small case, and it sucks.
    #16
  17. OurBC

    OurBC Live to Travel

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    #17
  18. weird1

    weird1 Adventurer

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  19. rockydog

    rockydog just a guy

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    okieland
    +1 on the sven saw, plus i use it to prop up the bike for lubing the chain, tire repair, etc. the hollow handle of the sven slips over the handles of a small titanium griddle, small hinged grill, and can add leverage to tools.
    #19
  20. Sparrowhawk

    Sparrowhawk Long timer

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    Sep 26, 2005
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    Eastern Washington, USA
    I also carry the Lee Valley Buck Saw. I wanted something that is light and packs up small but able to tackle good sized downed trees. The Lee Valley all packs up inside the longer metal tube just like the Sven. I chose it over the Sven because the buck saw shape gives you more depth (saw larger logs) for the same length blade compared to the A-frame Sven. Both work great and go through wood fast.
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    If you are a wood worker don't go the Lee Valley website unless you have a few hours to spend. They have way too many fine hand tools.​
    #20