Trans New Jersey Trail

Discussion in 'GPS Tracks - Northeast, Southeast & Florida' started by rob23, Jul 12, 2007.

  1. DukeNJ

    DukeNJ n00b

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    Please, help with converting the file.
    What do I need to do to convert the extracted files?
    I really appreciate if someone can provide a mini guide or step-by-step direction.
    Also, can we "upload" the routes to Google Maps or Google Earth for navigation?

    upload_2017-6-30_15-12-58.png
  2. john.thorp

    john.thorp Adventurer

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    Update: for anyone trying to get the maps to upload on cellphone instead of GPS:

    Before I get into the steps, for those more technically sophisticated than I am, here's the spoiler: you're converting a .gdb file to a .kml or .kmz file, then loading that file into your Google Maps account (while using your computer) then opening that same Google Maps account on your phone. If you know how to do that, skip this walkthrough and do it!

    It's a lot of steps, but I have made this work on an iPhone. If you're on an Android, see note at bottom if this method doesn't work, as I came across some other suggestions but didn't test because the following worked for me. This method requires that you have accounts with Dropbox and Google Maps, so do that first.

    1). Download this folder http://www.gpsvisualizer.com/gpsbabel/, unzip it, then drag to your desktop. The files you're looking for end in .gdb.
    2). Go to this website (again, thanks rob): http://www.gpsvisualizer.com/gpsbabel/
    3). On that page, upload any one of the .gdb files. I found the 2007 and 2008 versions to be the best. 2011 is a mess of way points with no trail to follow.
    4). Next, and this point is crucial but somewhat misleading: for the "output format" select Google Earth (not Google Maps, even though you'll be opening this eventually on your phone with Google Earth).
    5). Click "Map It" and wait for the next page to load. There will be a link that has a long string of numbers that I think is just basically a date/time stamp of when the file was created. Click that link, and you'll be prompted to open or save the file. Click save and put it on your desktop.
    6). Log into Google Maps on your computer (not your phone)
    7). Click the Menu, go to Your Places, and at the bottom of that side bar, you should see "Create New Map." Click it. It'll open a new window.
    8). Click Import, and load the .kmz or .kml file on your desktop that you generated from that website.
    9). Name it something you can remember.
    10). Repeat with as many of the maps as you want.
    11). It may take a few minutes for your account to sync, but after a while you should be able to open Google maps on your phone, go to Your Places, Your Maps, and the map should be available.

    Note 1. I have not tried following one of these maps yet in real time, on a moving bike, with spotty cell service. I imagine it to be imperfect (best case) or useless (worst case). So keep your wits about you and don't rely on this unless I reply next week with an update.

    Note 2. Android users: I found some websites saying that, once you've created the .kmz or .kml file with that conversion website, you can just email that file to yourself and open it on your phone. Should auto launch google maps. This did not work for me, but you may want to try it before you go through all the google account loading.

    Note 3. Android users: Found some other sources saying that you could also sync the files with Dropbox, if you have a Dropbox app (I don't) and just open the file.

    Hope this helps.
  3. john.thorp

    john.thorp Adventurer

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    Hey saw you're request after I'd posted this write up and realize it doesn't answer your questions directly, but if you follow those steps it should work. I'm also working on create a new Dropbox folder with the .gdb files already converted to .kmz but might take a second since I am not a hacker.
  4. john.thorp

    john.thorp Adventurer

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    Let me know if this link works? https://www.dropbox.com/home?preview=TNJT.zip

    It's identical to rob23's folder, except the .kmz and .kml files are in there too.

    So all you need to do is
    1). down load the folder
    2). unzip
    3). drag the five files to your desktop
    4). upload them to your google maps on a computer and
    5). check to see if you can access on your phone.
  5. john.thorp

    john.thorp Adventurer

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    Ok, in case this thread is still alive, have some things to share. All this has been said elsewhere, but thought it might help some to see this? I rode 150 miles of trail over 2 days on a 2002 Honda XR650L, with maybe 40lbs of gear. Felt like I had the perfect bike for this trip but YMMV. Any bigger and you'd need to be a really good adv rider. Any smaller and you'll want a trailer.

    1). Get a gps if you're serious about this. All that work I did to get the maps loaded helps but it'll be a lot of stopping. Works fine for me being on a big single (all those stops get me some rest), but if you just wanna ride, you need heads up display and a tracking map.

    2). As many have said, the sand on the lower and middle sections is very real. Do not go without at least a 50/50 tire and air down. Also, every gas station I stopped at had free air. For me, 18psi front, 22psi rear. Shinko 700, Dunlop 606, Kenda 270, all should be fine. I have not encountered sand like this anywhere but northern Arizona and southern Utah. It's light, it's deep, it's everywhere. If you've never ridden sand do not go alone.

    3). Country down there is pretty savage. Lots of bugs, lots of thorns, but I was never out of cell range, and probably never too far out of shouting range. So if you're new to off road riding, this is a great place to learn before you take off for Labrador or wherever. Even if you tip over and end up with a sprained ankle (on that note, WEAR MX BOOTS), you'll be out, with your bike, in a matter of hours.
    rotorhead511 likes this.
  6. levain

    levain STILL Jim Williams

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    LOcus Pro is the way to go here. Use GPS visualizer to convert to GPX, then just import it into Locus. It's easy, fast and drama free. And, here's the big thread.
  7. Sgt Nucci USMC

    Sgt Nucci USMC n00b

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    Where on this thread are the GPS files located? New to adventure bike riding but an avid enduro rider and I'd love to take the GSA offroad.
  8. MuckSavage

    MuckSavage A Piney Irregular

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  9. lucmac

    lucmac n00b

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    Was just about to ask if this thread was really dead and has everyone moved on to a different current thread about riding in New Jersey. I live in Delaware County PA (relatively close to the Commodore Barry Bridge for a frame of reference) and am looking for a good legal place to trailer the bike to ride for 2 to 3 hours. Is Wharton State Forest/Atsion a good choice? Where can you park the trailer and gear up? What are the legalities of riding around there? I have a DR650 so the street legal part is covered. Any NJ park passes or anything else like that have to be had first?

    I'm not familiar with NJ's terrain other than the reputation for sand. Where are the large sections that are 'less sandy'?

    Thanks!
  10. MuckSavage

    MuckSavage A Piney Irregular

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