TravellingStrom Needs Advice - Please Help Me To Decide

Discussion in 'Land of the Rising Sun: ADV Bikes from Japan' started by TravellingStrom, Dec 25, 2012.

  1. TravellingStrom

    TravellingStrom Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2007
    Oddometer:
    397
    Location:
    Rockhampton, Australia
    Hi there Gurus and the rest of us, merry Christmas if you do that thing.

    I need some advice here.

    Please read my latest blog post, rather than trying to repost it all here and I have crap internet today as well

    http://travellingstrom.com/2012/12/25/

    If you haven't read the blog post yet, the following will not make sense





    Basically I need to know, is it OK to run the clutch basket without the metal strap, how important is it, what does it do. Should I just wait and order a new basket and not run it?

    There are small flecks of metal in the engine, very soft metal, from the band that is no longer on the clutch basket. Is it Ok to just run and flush the engine a few times, until no more glitter comes out, or does this engine need a full strip down and rebuild?

    I am not limited by time, but my patience is running thin with this country and the mechanic shop here.

    My only other option is to truck the bike to Bangkok and have it looked at by factory trained mechanics, although there is no Suzuki shop there, only Kawasaki and some other brands.

    Let me know soon please, my liver is rejecting me!

    Cheers from Vientiane
    TravellingStrom
    #1
  2. Kawidad

    Kawidad Long timer

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    Given your situation, I'd run it as you suggest. Not ideal, but it would seem workable. :deal

    That metal band is probable to prevent the clutch basket from flexing under load and most clutches do not have that band, so I would take an educated guess and say it is not essential. :slurp
    #2
  3. Wolfgang55

    Wolfgang55 Long timer

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    Keep in mind your operation of the clutch may in fact be a key factor in its longevity.
    #3
  4. TravellingStrom

    TravellingStrom Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2007
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    Location:
    Rockhampton, Australia
    Ok thanks. It might be best to replace it but sourcing and getting one delivered is the logistics problem

    I don't want it to fail in the backwoods of Cambodia
    #4
  5. Kawidad

    Kawidad Long timer

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    I totally agree with you! That's why I qualified my answer. :norton

    I would stay along roads and not stray too far off of the beaten path. Those Chinese mechanics really knackered your bike up. :puke1
    #5
  6. TravellingStrom

    TravellingStrom Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2007
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    397
    Location:
    Rockhampton, Australia
    Actually I have just learnt it may be more important than first thought. It seems with the way the clutch is operated at high revs it stops the fingers from ballooning outwards

    So it may mean a new basket or bodgy up a new strap to hold the ends down. Getting that balanced right could be tricky but it might work at a pinch

    It has given me new life though all this support

    I have to inspect the rear valves tomorrow for bending or other piston damage but after that I may have an idea of which way to go. It seems the rear intake valves have a valve clearance of shit loads. By that I mean it is supposed to be between 0.2-0.3 whatever but the measured and found something like 5mm+

    I am unsure now exactly what happened but tomorrow we will remove the head and see if anything is terminal

    Cheers
    TS
    #6
  7. Gaulin

    Gaulin Orange (& Blue) Crush

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2004
    Oddometer:
    101
    Location:
    Manitoba, Canuckistan
    Hey TS,

    I asked a reputable SV650 engine builder (same engine other than cams) and the thought is you can run the clutch basket as-is. As the higher the RPM, the higher the centripetal force will be that will deflect the fingers out, if you stick to a cruising RPM, you'd probably be OK to get it back home.

    When I saw this recent post, it sounds like the clutch basket may be the least of your worries :(:. As the clutch side cam chain drives the rear cylinder valves, seems like more than just a coincidence your clearances are way out. When you get that head off you can tell for sure, but I'd guess the basket strip running through the cam gear caused it to skip and lost timing, smacking some valves.

    I don't know how much help I can be from across the world, but I have all the parts you need to get going (everything but the cams) assuming the crank and rods are ok. Let me know and I'll do what I can to help.

    Glenn
    #7
  8. TravellingStrom

    TravellingStrom Been here awhile

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    Jun 29, 2007
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    Location:
    Rockhampton, Australia
    Thanks for the info, and the offer, I thought I replied to this earlier

    Anyway they were too busy to have a look today so maybe tomorrow I will find out what is wrong under there
    #8
  9. Sharealike

    Sharealike SV&DL1k No Chudder Clutch

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2010
    Oddometer:
    12
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    North United Kingdom
    Was following you on VSRI.

    The band is in deed to stop the fingers flexing out at high speeds. Many clutch baskets of the same diameter and finger design run without it. Those that need it are wider so more force at the root of the fingers. I think it would be ok to run without if you kept the engine speed down to two thirds of max.

    Either the original band fractured at a joint or a weak spot and came off. No way did it come off as one ring as it was made and fitted at the factory. Another thought is the mechanics cut the old one off because the new friction plates fouled it or more likely the now drilled out indents in the aluminium splines foulded the plates. Interesting to know if the picture of said mechanic holding the friction plate in place shows other new plates in place further into the splines? All I can see is him offering a new plate up. Other puzzle I have is that band looks to be dark from hardening in the mechanic picture. Looks lighter and softer than I would expect in later pics where it's been through the gear teeth. Any sign they tried to make a new one or fasten the old one after they cut it off? Bound to come off if they did either.

    The smaller of the two gears the strip has run through is the crankshaft. No way would the backlash in the gears be enough for the strip to pass through without something besides the strip distorting. It will certainly have seriously overloaded the drive side crankshaft main bearing and gear box input shaft (what the clutch runs on). They might recover. The bits of metal might just be what the cam chain has "chainsawed" off the band of soft metal. The oil filter will have stopped any that fell to the sump from reaching the main bearings and camshafts.

    Piston hitting valves on the rear looks likely. Either the cam chain did jump due to levering action of the strip or the sudden slowing of the engine when the broken strip ran through the gears damaged the rod or piston.
    #9
  10. Sharealike

    Sharealike SV&DL1k No Chudder Clutch

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2010
    Oddometer:
    12
    Location:
    North United Kingdom
    mcguyver in Brisbane appeal over on Stromtrooper to Help the travellingstrom
    <HR style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #d1d1e1; COLOR: #d1d1e1" SIZE=1><!-- / icon and title --><!-- message -->Gents I need your help. As some of you may know Richard (travelling strom) is stranded in Vientiane Laos with a strom in dire need of some valves and a clutch basket. He is unable to get the parts he needs there.
    I have ordered the parts and they will be here in Brisbane on Wednesday, but we are struggling to find a courier that will get them there quickly but at a reasonable price. Ups and FedEx are quoting hundreds of dollars.

    Anyone out the in the freight business that can offer some advice?

    The other issue is that I leave for Sth America on Monday, my wife will pick up the parts but she has no idea how to send stuff to remote locations, so time is of the essence.

    Any advice appreciated.
    <!-- / message --><!-- sig -->__________________

    This might help - A very well packed clutch basket and valves will be no more than 3kg and fit a box 25 cm by 25 cm by 20 cm.
    And just for perspective - Just Business as usual FedEx offer three day and five day services to Laos from the UK. £52 and £34 respectively.
    #10
  11. TravellingStrom

    TravellingStrom Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2007
    Oddometer:
    397
    Location:
    Rockhampton, Australia

    The cheapest was going to take too long, the DHL was $200

    In the end I am getting them brought to KL, I will fly to KL and return with them A few dollars more but I am going stir crazy without a bike :(

    I just want to get back on the road

    Cheers
    TS
    #11