Trials Riding Technique

Discussion in 'Trials' started by Rogue_Ryder, Oct 1, 2009.

  1. Rogue_Ryder

    Rogue_Ryder 速 Flat Biller 速

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    Lot's of threads about the bikes but not much info on Technique.

    I don't think I'll be getting into Trials Competition anytime soon, but I'd love to be able to ride my Dirt Bike over some of the Huge Obstacles like Trials Guys do and Good Enduro Riders.

    For example the kid clearing the boulder; this is probably a pretty tough technique to nail down. I can ride over them big logs out on the trail, like the kid in the background is doing but shamefully it's not easy for me.
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    Logs are about the only Obstacles around here; I don't think there's any rocks for over few hundred miles.

    Here's some of the Obstacles from one of our upcoming Hare Scrambles. I take the easy way around but it adds a lot of time to your lap to bypass. I took the bypasses at the last HS I did; I probably coulda made the Log Crossings but didn't wanna hold up faster riders if I didn't make it on the 1st attempt.
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    This is a shitty pic but the rocky portion is a step up jump to the larger dirt obstacle
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    #1
  2. Gordy

    Gordy Team Listo

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    That kid clearing the boulder is no slouch and has probably been doing this sport for many, many years! The going up isn't so bad, it's the keeping pressure and getting off the downhill without endoing is the trick.

    Wish I could.
    #2
  3. grizzzly

    grizzzly The Pre-Banned Version

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    I think that the best way to learn to ride is to go to an event and ride in competition (you can start in beginner and move up)
    #3
  4. lamotovita

    lamotovita Ageing Adventurer

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    Why don't you contact your local Trials club and ask if they have or will have a dirt bike/beginner class? Most clubs will do most anything to increase their turnout at events.
    An enduro bike with low gearing, steering stops ground for max. steering lock and a rear Trials tire can be quite effective in the novice lines of an Observed Trial. And yes it will make you a better rider for the Hare Scrambles.
    #4
  5. rokhopr

    rokhopr 2014 Beta 200

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    I got started with a class \ vacation at the Trials Training Center in TN. They also have plenty of how-to's on their web page http://trialstrainingcenter.com/how-to-ride-motorcycle-trials/

    Or if you get a chance take a class from multi-time National Champ Ryan Young. Your local club can make arrangements to have Ryan come out to your area for a class if there are enough students.

    Riding a trials bike is fun but, my opinion, you must ride in trials events in order to get the full appreciation of how fine an art riding trials is and that the skills learned in competition will translate into improved riding skills in other modes.

    Enjoy the ride.
    #5
  6. Gordy

    Gordy Team Listo

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    Now you tell me! :lol3
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  7. chaos

    chaos Adventurer

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    That rider in the pic is Ron Commo III, hes the #5 Pro Rider in the US. Very talented. In that pic he is riding a 125.

    Trials technique for logs...

    1st read this..

    Double Blip!

    The double blip technique is used for obstacles which are shorter in height then
    the wheelbase of the motorcycle and often slightly angled. In the double blip
    technique the rider approaches the obstacle at slow to moderate speed and blips
    the throttle to lift the front wheel. The rider bends his knees to allow the
    motorcycle to come up to him while staying centered. If done correctly the front
    wheel strikes a glancing blow off the obstacle and changes direction to parallel
    up the surface of the obstacle. At this point the throttle is reduced to allow the
    rear suspension to uncompress. The rear suspension should be fully uncompressed
    when the rear wheel reaches the base of the obstacle. Just before the rear wheel
    contacts the obstacle the throttle is again blipped to drive the rear wheel into
    the obstacle. As this is happening the rider straightens his legs to help drive
    the rear wheel into the obstacle as well as get his weight over the front wheel.
    The throttle is snapped off to allow the rear wheel to drive up the face of the
    obstacle while at the same time the rear suspension begins to uncompress. The
    rider again bends his knees allowing the rear of the bike to come up under him.
    The unloading rear suspension pivots the bike forward around the axis of the
    swingarm and the drag of the decelerating motor pivot the motorcycle around the
    rear axle. The reason there is a limit to the size of the obstacle for this
    technique is that the front wheel cannot be in tight contact with the obstacle
    when the rear suspension unloads for the second time as both front and rear will
    just push you backwards off the wall. The most common error in the double blip
    technique is not shutting the throttle off between blips. This causes the rear
    suspension to stay loaded which doesn't allow the motorcycle to efficiently change
    the direction of force from straight forward to up. If done properly the rear of
    the motorcycle does not hit the base of the obstacle with any more force then is
    necessary to grab traction for the climb.


    Dan Williams


    Then watch this<!-- / message -->

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_wyAUcyPqKE

    Then this...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IN1pi7k9gkA

    These should help...a lot.
    #7
  8. H_Mushmann

    H_Mushmann Smartass

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    I have a video taken at a local trials 5 years ago that has Ron in a few scenes. He was 12 (I think?) when the video was shot and is struggling to get through the obstacles in several sections.

    The point is you don't get good at trials overnight. It takes years of practice to get good at trials and even more practice to be a top-level competitor. I have no trouble clearing obstacles on my (vintage) trials bike or my enduro bike, but put me in a trials competition and link several obstacles together and I feel like a complete noob.

    Best advice anyone ever gave me to improve my riding was; "Keep practicing the hard stuff until it becomes easy. Then find something harder to practice." That advice came from multi-time ISDT/E medallist, Jeff Fredette.
    #8
  9. Brewtus

    Brewtus Buffoonery, Inc.

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    +1 :thumb
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  10. Rogue_Ryder

    Rogue_Ryder 速 Flat Biller 速

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    Thanks for all the replies!

    Unfortunately "Local Competitions/Clubs" just do NOT exist. If they did I'd be there in a minute.

    The camp thing is a thought though. I think I'll try to set-up some logs and obstacles at the local ORV place; it's pretty sad but there just isn't that many people around here that are very interested in riding difficult terrain. The local cross country series is mostly MX guys and only the top guys are clearing the obstacles the rest of us are taking the by-passes. I'd like to ride the obstacles with ease; right now I know I could ride some of them but am not confident enough in my abilities to do it in competition for fear of crashing, getting stuck and holding up an XC1 or XC2 rider..
    #10
  11. H_Mushmann

    H_Mushmann Smartass

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    If you check with trials bikes importers, they can steer you towards the nearest dealer.
    #11
  12. jjustj

    jjustj cum petris et choris

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  13. Rogue_Ryder

    Rogue_Ryder 速 Flat Biller 速

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    Cool thanks for the link; looks like 8hrs away is the closest trials events (FL and TX). Too bad there's zero interest in the sport here in the Gulf region.
    #13
  14. wolvertone

    wolvertone Save a mile-Kill a metre!

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    Duke!! It's Steve (the guy who bought/traded your old BMW K100) I've got a '96 Beta Techno and ride logs and stumps in my 1/3 acre backyard.

    You are right, this sport is DEAD here. Let me know if you set something up, I'd love to go trials riding with someone.

    ORV... hmmm you mean the spillway?

    Steve
    #14
  15. Rogue_Ryder

    Rogue_Ryder 速 Flat Biller 速

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    Hey Steve!
    Yeah man I will for sure; there's a '96 on Clist for $1200 needing a lot of work but I think the guy wants too much for it. There's a relatively new place right near NAS Belle Chase that's got some trails. It's called "Plaquemine Off-Road Park" you can ride the entire place in an hour but it's only 30mins from my house. There's plenty of room to set up some obstacles out there though.
    #15