Triumph Scrambler

Discussion in 'British Beasts: Triumph Tigers' started by danger_dave, May 29, 2006.

  1. TerryK

    TerryK Ulysses

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    adelaide South Australia
    Fitted heated grips to the Scrambler today, will make those cold rides much better.

    Cheers Terry
  2. RMAK

    RMAK The Magnanimous

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    That's great, Terry. But when does it get cold in Australia? I was there for a few days in the late 60's and it was hot. I thought you only had a rainy season.
  3. TerryK

    TerryK Ulysses

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    It's winter ATM Rich, down here in the Southern states it's 14 - 16c most days, for us that's cold.

    We spent last week up in Queensand...lovely 22c

    Terry
  4. ChuBrocka

    ChuBrocka Been here awhile

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    Ottawa, ON
    I had the same problem this spring. Ended up cooking the chrome of my top exhaust pipe because the fuel was passing through the cylinder and burning in the pipe! I bought the Promom unit from British customs and it has been running well for me. I have only been running it since late May/early June though, so I can't say much about it's longevity. For the price I'd say it's worth trying.
  5. MightyChosen1

    MightyChosen1 I wanna be sedated

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    I ordered one this morning form NewBonneville. I have to to say in almost 3 years of owning the Scrambler this is the first time I have ever had any problems with it. I had been noticing a slight miss that only seemed to occur in very hot weather for a couple months. Strange that it seems to usually be the right cylinder that dies from what I read over on the TriumphRat forum.


    Have you changed any of the tuning parameters on yours? I already downloaded the software and may tune it a bit.




    .
  6. optical

    optical Adventurer

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    4 Oil changes later and the scrambler seems good as new.

    Who knew it was amphibious. Like a Tank!
  7. sillymike

    sillymike Yep! That's me...

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    Gaspesie
    While I will not go out and seek rocky sections to play with the Scram... I feel they are bound to occur when you're out and about exploring the back roads...

    And that factory skid plate that's 3" too short and leave the oil filter has been "bugging" for some time. Heck, it's been known to give me nightmare... where I dream that some rock will puncture the filter, and I'll be stuck in the middle of no-where... looking for a new filter and 4q of oil :eek1

    -

    So to help me sleep better, I added a 3" extension... I was going to get a local guy to weld it... but decided to have it is hinged instead, so I don't need to remove the skidplate for the occasional oil change.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    There's a little less than 1/4" clearance between the bolt and the filter, so for good measures, I taped a piece inner tube over the bolts...
  8. mint julep

    mint julep Been here awhile

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    @SillyMike - Well done!

    I thought the same when I received my Scram and looked underneath and said WTF? Why didn't they cover that filter for maximum coverage. :huh

    It did make me want to find or have built a longer plate.
    what you did is a great idea. makes a whole lot of sense to me.:clap

    Dave
  9. tri boy

    tri boy Been here awhile

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    No nuke zone
    Fitted a Procom igniter about 5mths ago, after Triumph NZ wanted to seperate me from$1400NZ.
    Easy friendly bunch at procom. Nothing was a problem re freight etc to New Zealand, and the product works fine.:D

    PS, Been a while since I posted, (computers and me don't always get on).
    My bike is over 50 000km and still purring along.
    Valves etc are fine,and I still smile when I fire her up. Happy days.
  10. ChuBrocka

    ChuBrocka Been here awhile

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    Haven't played with the programming yet. I'm only a year in with biking and haven't gotten that adventurous yet. The furthest I've gone is checking my valves after the dealer wanted $950 for the 24,000 mile service package. If you play around with it be sure to post your results. I'd be interested to see what you can do with it.
  11. MightyChosen1

    MightyChosen1 I wanna be sedated

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    $950 ? Whats involved with the 24k service? A new motor?


    I just finished checking my valves at 16K miles and they were still in spec. My bike has never been back to the dealer since I bought it. One reason is the nearest dealer is 150 miles away, The other is because I am a cheapskate and wont pay those kind of fees.




    Hopefully my igniter will be in by the end of the week. I'll let you know how it performs.
  12. Maxacceleration

    Maxacceleration Off the grid

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    Funny everyone speaks of their valves staying in spec.
    My valves were out of spec at 12K and required adjustment.
    I wonder if that has to do with riding style by each owner?

    I know I wring the neck of my Scrambler... I'm always chasing a Moto Guzzi down... :lol3

    At my 12K service the valve adjustment and TB sync (plus a much needed filter cleaning) really improved the running of my bike.
    FWIW...
  13. TerryK

    TerryK Ulysses

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    Just tried out the heated hand grips on the Scrambler, worked a treat even came back with summer gloves on..warm hands, bliss

    Cheers Terry
  14. allan68

    allan68 Adventurer

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    Terry,

    What brand of grips did you purchase and where did you hook the wires up to?

  15. amanlikemike

    amanlikemike Recoverin speedfreak

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    OK, so it's a Bonneville. But we like Bonnies too. And, regardless, this video sure does the trick:

    <iframe src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/K1eSDYRTk_w" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" width="560"></iframe>

  16. BronkoRob

    BronkoRob Adventurer

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    alright scrambler gurus...i got a question.

    in the market for a new bike this fall. im a vintage fanatic, but my next bike i want modern reliability, good brakes, and modern suspension. the scrambler seems to be a good mix from what ive read, still working on the other 1000 pages of this thread though.

    my 3 bikes in the mix right now are the scrambler, sportster, and a monster. I know all different bikes, but they fit my price range and seem like good commuter bikes. i have never owned a triumph or a ducati, but had an 87 sportster. it had issues when i got it from crap fixes from previous owners, and it was only a 4 speed. so im putting that behind me and have heard good stuff from the newer bikes. im not familiar with the triumph and ducati quirks and issues.

    right now number one is the scrambler though. i love the desert sled look, and i like the idea that i can take it on some dirt roads and truck trails in my area and do some exploring. I have a dirt bike, so im not looking for a true dual sport, but like i said i like that desert sled look, and wouldnt mind getting it dirty once in awhile on reasonable terrain.

    do the scramblers come with a different suspension setup than the other triumphs to make it more "dual sportish" or is this just a bonneville with high pipes? what are the other differences that are specific to the scrambler?

    also to all you guys that got one, what were your other choices when you were looking for a bike and what pushed you towards the triumph?
  17. optical

    optical Adventurer

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  18. BronkoRob

    BronkoRob Adventurer

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    optical - yup found it and have been watching it a LOT. along with the way of the desert sled video. how is out of the box performance? the desert sled video has a pretty modified scrambler. the scramble me video looks like a pretty stock bike, and it looks like it taking a pretty good beating.

    ive always wanted an original desert sled AJS, Matchless, BSA, or triumph project bike, but never found any near by for reasonable prices. So i figure this is perfect. the look i like, and all the modern day technology, and i can drive it daily. and probably a lot cheaper in the long run than an original.

    im sure most of my questions will be answered as i read the thousand pages of this post over the next couple months. im impressed with the die hard fan base already.
  19. RMAK

    RMAK The Magnanimous

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    Other choices?! As a vintage bike fanatic and owner myself there really wasn't any other choice. I saw the Scrambler and that was it.
  20. amanlikemike

    amanlikemike Recoverin speedfreak

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    Location:
    The Big Easy.
    Here's the abridged version of my conversion:

    • Saw a photo, got curious
    • Sat on the first matt khaki custom machine at a bike show
    • Got that feeling
    • Took a test ride
    • Grinned a lot
    • Bought one
    • Farkles
    • Lots o' miles
    • Scraped pegs
    • Falling off in the loose stuff
    • More grinning
    Basically it is a Bonneville with high pipes and fork gators, but with one major difference: the 270 firing order is far superior to the Bonnie's 360 degree operation of the same motor, providing less top-end (but who cares about that on a long haul) more torque and an even sweeter sound. This is in no way a Dual Sport bike, but that - as I'm sure you've seen in this thread - really doesn't mean you can't hit the trails with it if you just commit and accept that it aint no KTM.

    That said, you will need to switch out the crappy standard shocks and fork springs - even for spirited road riding. Ditching the immensely heavy exhaust really helps the handling too. Oh, and the tyres - those OEM Bridgestones are washy as all hell. Saddle's a bit on the plank side too. New pads and discs aren't a bad idea either. Beyond that lighter, stronger rims are on the list.

    With just half-decent suspension, you can still ride the wheels off the thing without getting too deep into jail territory if you ever do get clocked. And when it does get a bit out of shape (which it will), you get plenty of warning, so it's much more 'shits n' giggles' than 'shityerpants' when the front pushes, or whatever. Obviously, a few more ponies wouldn't do any harm (aint that always the case!), but a decent air filter and free-flowing exhaust system helps the thing breathe far better. Rip out the AI while you're at it too.

    As you may have guessed, in my humble opinion there are some essential mods required out of the crate if you want to work the bike hard on various surfaces. On any other bike, that'd be a deal-breaker, but with a Scram' it's different. It's not supposed to be fast or climb like a mountain goat, it's just meant just to be a nice bike - what you do with it (tootle around the countryside, split lanes on the way to work or take off around the world or whatever) is your business. Two wheels good - pretty much the essence of motorcycling. And stripping them down or tarting them up is all part of the enjoyment because it's a bike you can truly make your own. Especially because it's real easy to work on and doesn't have a load of baffling electronics waiting to let you down in the middle of nowhere - particularly if you go for the pretty much bomb-proof carbed version.

    Essentially, out of all the bikes I've owned, this is the one that makes me grin the most. That's why I bought it and fully intend to see all the zeros on the odometer at least once more. I recently emigrated from the UK to the US, but instead of doing the smart thing by selling it and buying another over here, I'll be shelling out far too much on shipping, duty and going through hell to import and register it, because I irrationally decided this one's a keeper. What is also interesting is that, for some reason, out of all the machines I've owned it also happens to be the one that makes my non-riding mates consider getting a bike too.

    Plus, Scramblers look better a bit beat up and dirty, which is a result. :thumb

    My advice: give it a go. At least take a test ride. They hold their value well too, so you can always chop it in for something else if for some reason it doesn't quite do it for you.




    Michael