Triumph Scrambler

Discussion in 'British Beasts: Triumph Tigers' started by danger_dave, May 29, 2006.

  1. optical

    optical Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2012
    Oddometer:
    64
    Location:
    North Virginia
  2. BronkoRob

    BronkoRob Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2011
    Oddometer:
    72
    Location:
    Oceanside, CA
    optical - yup found it and have been watching it a LOT. along with the way of the desert sled video. how is out of the box performance? the desert sled video has a pretty modified scrambler. the scramble me video looks like a pretty stock bike, and it looks like it taking a pretty good beating.

    ive always wanted an original desert sled AJS, Matchless, BSA, or triumph project bike, but never found any near by for reasonable prices. So i figure this is perfect. the look i like, and all the modern day technology, and i can drive it daily. and probably a lot cheaper in the long run than an original.

    im sure most of my questions will be answered as i read the thousand pages of this post over the next couple months. im impressed with the die hard fan base already.
  3. RMAK

    RMAK The Magnanimous

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2006
    Oddometer:
    351
    Location:
    Ohio
    Other choices?! As a vintage bike fanatic and owner myself there really wasn't any other choice. I saw the Scrambler and that was it.
  4. amanlikemike

    amanlikemike Recoverin speedfreak

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,063
    Location:
    The Big Easy.
    Here's the abridged version of my conversion:

    • Saw a photo, got curious
    • Sat on the first matt khaki custom machine at a bike show
    • Got that feeling
    • Took a test ride
    • Grinned a lot
    • Bought one
    • Farkles
    • Lots o' miles
    • Scraped pegs
    • Falling off in the loose stuff
    • More grinning
    Basically it is a Bonneville with high pipes and fork gators, but with one major difference: the 270 firing order is far superior to the Bonnie's 360 degree operation of the same motor, providing less top-end (but who cares about that on a long haul) more torque and an even sweeter sound. This is in no way a Dual Sport bike, but that - as I'm sure you've seen in this thread - really doesn't mean you can't hit the trails with it if you just commit and accept that it aint no KTM.

    That said, you will need to switch out the crappy standard shocks and fork springs - even for spirited road riding. Ditching the immensely heavy exhaust really helps the handling too. Oh, and the tyres - those OEM Bridgestones are washy as all hell. Saddle's a bit on the plank side too. New pads and discs aren't a bad idea either. Beyond that lighter, stronger rims are on the list.

    With just half-decent suspension, you can still ride the wheels off the thing without getting too deep into jail territory if you ever do get clocked. And when it does get a bit out of shape (which it will), you get plenty of warning, so it's much more 'shits n' giggles' than 'shityerpants' when the front pushes, or whatever. Obviously, a few more ponies wouldn't do any harm (aint that always the case!), but a decent air filter and free-flowing exhaust system helps the thing breathe far better. Rip out the AI while you're at it too.

    As you may have guessed, in my humble opinion there are some essential mods required out of the crate if you want to work the bike hard on various surfaces. On any other bike, that'd be a deal-breaker, but with a Scram' it's different. It's not supposed to be fast or climb like a mountain goat, it's just meant just to be a nice bike - what you do with it (tootle around the countryside, split lanes on the way to work or take off around the world or whatever) is your business. Two wheels good - pretty much the essence of motorcycling. And stripping them down or tarting them up is all part of the enjoyment because it's a bike you can truly make your own. Especially because it's real easy to work on and doesn't have a load of baffling electronics waiting to let you down in the middle of nowhere - particularly if you go for the pretty much bomb-proof carbed version.

    Essentially, out of all the bikes I've owned, this is the one that makes me grin the most. That's why I bought it and fully intend to see all the zeros on the odometer at least once more. I recently emigrated from the UK to the US, but instead of doing the smart thing by selling it and buying another over here, I'll be shelling out far too much on shipping, duty and going through hell to import and register it, because I irrationally decided this one's a keeper. What is also interesting is that, for some reason, out of all the machines I've owned it also happens to be the one that makes my non-riding mates consider getting a bike too.

    Plus, Scramblers look better a bit beat up and dirty, which is a result. :thumb

    My advice: give it a go. At least take a test ride. They hold their value well too, so you can always chop it in for something else if for some reason it doesn't quite do it for you.




    Michael
  5. 9mmMike

    9mmMike Vicarious Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 11, 2011
    Oddometer:
    137
    Location:
    SE PA
    I just sold my Ducati Monster. Did not have any issues with it. Great bike, especially after I upgraded the suspension (a post-off opportunity!). I never road it after I got my Scrambler though and it was a shame to have it sitting around. The Monster was waaaaaaaay faster, lighter and better handling (not that I even came close to riding it to its full potential) but the Scrambler was (for whatever reason) more fun. I do miss the sportyness (just a little) but I have a T100 that I may sell to get myself a Thruxton. Too busy enjoying the Scrambler right now though. Other than the different crank, I would agree the Scrambler is as you said essentially a "bonneville with high pipes" but somehow, it seems like more than that. The suspension and some other small bits are more like the Thrux actually but the exhaust and knobby's just make it "different".
    I am not a young man and this bike fits me and my riding style to a T. Not going hardcore offroad anytime soon and not racing any rice-rockets either. I simply love riding this bike.
  6. TerryK

    TerryK Ulysses

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,791
    Location:
    adelaide South Australia
    I got the Oxford hot grips, I ran the wires down low from the grips, bit neater that way.

    Terry
  7. TerryK

    TerryK Ulysses

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,791
    Location:
    adelaide South Australia
    I have had a Scrambler since 2008 & have had a lot of fun on it & have bought another classic a 2009 Thruxton....they are so different it is hard to believe.
    For me the riding position is perfect (5'6" & 74kgs) it's smooth, stops better & goes better than the Scrambler.
    But in saying that I took the Scrambler out yesterday & had a ball, I bought both bikes without a test ride & I've got to say both have been better than I ever dreamed they would.
    My wife thought I was crazy getting the Thruxton " why do you want 2 bikes almost the same" I took my brother in law out & he rode both, could not believe the difference.

    Different folk like different bikes for different reasons but I think I have the perfect pair for me at least.

    Terry
  8. Shercoman

    Shercoman Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2008
    Oddometer:
    457
    Location:
    Pine,Colorado
    I haven't read every page of this thread so I'll ask if anyone has done a longer travel Scrambler?

    I have bought a DR650 front suspension and adapting that will be easy.
    I have been talking with Works Performance about a set of custom shocks for longer travel.
    With the geometry of the swing arm,about 7.5 inches of travel is the maximum.

    I will have to add a chain tensioner and probably a rear guide as the chain gets very loose at full droop.

    I already have the front forks mounted and I'm thinking about pulling the trigger on the custom shocks.
    Obviously the bike will be taller but with the forks painted black and gaiters in place it will look relatively stock.

    Has anyone done this and are there any drawbacks that I am not seeing?

    My purpose in this is to make a more capable Dual Sport mount. Obviously not a motocross bike but more forgiving on the rocky back country roads here in Colorado.

    I'm open to pros and cons on this idea.

    My inspiration is the "Trouble" conversion owned by a member of this forum.Obviously not in that league but a step in that direction.
  9. sillymike

    sillymike Yep! That's me...

    Joined:
    May 5, 2005
    Oddometer:
    167
    Location:
    Gaspesie
    The other contenders were;
    - Moto Guzi V7... But dealerships are few and far between
    - Tiger 955... Would have been a more rational bike, but I liked the look of the Scrambler better.
    - BMW R65... But I wanted a bike that was still in production...


    Beside, I've had a bug for the Scrambler ever since it came out...
  10. delwilli

    delwilli n00b

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2008
    Oddometer:
    4
    Location:
    Cayucos, california
    I am considering fork mods on my 2012 Scrambler. I have kind of narrowed it down to the Bitubo fork cartridge kit vs. the Ricor intimidators with heavier springs. Both look like they would work well but I am kind of leaning towards the Bitubo setup as it is more "modern" technology. Have any of you first hand knowledge of the above units? The fork mods will be matched to either the Bitubo WMT or Works billet tracker shocks

    Thanks in advance!
  11. Maxacceleration

    Maxacceleration Awol

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2009
    Oddometer:
    2,297
    Location:
    Wa
    It has crossed my mind Sherco. I think some have said here to leave the Scrambler alone, to keep its classic lines.
    But... I think the right person could give the bike longer travel.
    If you have the fab skills (or fabricator) and a pocketbook I think a nice original outcome could be had.
    The bike will still be heavy... tall & heavy. You are changing the geometry by using a leading axle fork, which could be figured in with the right triple clamps.
    In an all out build, I would do a banana swingarm as on the Maico pictured below. Lots of geometry to figure in there...
    Oh, raise it level or slightly rear high or mimic some dirtbike geometry.
    I believe there is a carbon fiber tank out there. Nice for weight savings.
    Trim a seat down an inch for your raised bike...
    But the real deal would be a chrome moly frame as on Trouble.
    Yes I own Trouble and at 380 lbs it is significantly light than a stock Scrambler.
    Those are the things I think of in my dream build and still keeping classic lines.
    If you go through with it... Good luck, and...
    We want pictures. :evil

    [​IMG]
  12. Extreme scrambler

    Extreme scrambler Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2012
    Oddometer:
    27
    Location:
    Alphen aan den Rijn, the Netherlands
    [​IMG]

    This is my Scrambler.
    It's still work in progress.
    I did a 21" / 18" conversion,
    I hope you like it.
  13. HackFlipper

    HackFlipper Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2008
    Oddometer:
    70
    Location:
    Oregon
    Took the wife out "Scrambling" on some forest roads around Mt. Hood, Oregon. Here are some pics. :D

    [​IMG]




    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]



    [​IMG]




    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]




    [​IMG]
  14. Shercoman

    Shercoman Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2008
    Oddometer:
    457
    Location:
    Pine,Colorado
    This is a very cool looking Scrambler.:clap
    Can you detail your mods?
    Your suspension changes look like what I want to do.
    Forks?
    Travel?
    Shocks?
    Travel?
    Sprocket sizes?
    Rear travel looks longer,any chain tension issues?
    Front brake?

    Very nice job!!!
  15. Isde265

    Isde265 ISDE 265

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2011
    Oddometer:
    3
    Location:
    Alcoy, Spain: 1M curves between see and paradise
    I love your scrambler!! Nice job

    I specially like the rear part, What kind of rear fender is it?

    If you have more pics, I am sure we all will enjoy them!!:clap
  16. BronkoRob

    BronkoRob Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2011
    Oddometer:
    72
    Location:
    Oceanside, CA
    i happen to have a triumph dealer about 20 minutes from my house....not sure if this is a good thing or a bad thing. i went out this morning to check out the scramblers in person.....yup i gotta have one!

    everything felt good on the bike. i could feel how the seat could get to you after a long time. how does the solo seat with the rack compare to the stocker? lucky for me it was raining and i had flip flops on otherwise i may have made some rash decisions in there..lol so i didnt get to test drive one. i dont think i would be put off by the performance either way, my last bike was a KZ650 which felt fast enough for me.

    EFI vs Carb? is their a significant difference in performance? how are the carbs on triumphs? are they pretty solid or on the finiky side? i can deal with carbs, not an issue, but i dont want to have to immediately start hunting for carbs on a new bike either. id rather hunt around over the next few months and find a used bike that has all the typical aftermarket goodies and save a few bucks. other than the motor going from silver to black, paint schemes, and carbs to efi, any other significant changes over the years?

    i noticed the 2012 had dual guages, i kind of like the one larger guage and the smaller tachs you guys are putting on under the bars. what year did they go with the 2 guages?
  17. Extreme scrambler

    Extreme scrambler Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2012
    Oddometer:
    27
    Location:
    Alphen aan den Rijn, the Netherlands
    The front fork is a modified drz400e one and the rear shocks are custom hyperpro.
    I lengtend the swingarm by 50mm.
    I modified a bmw chaintensioner from a g650x.
    The front brake is a galver disc with a brembo caliper
  18. Extreme scrambler

    Extreme scrambler Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2012
    Oddometer:
    27
    Location:
    Alphen aan den Rijn, the Netherlands
  19. tvscum

    tvscum Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2012
    Oddometer:
    141
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    I recommend the Bitubo cartridge kit. See comments here:
    http://www.triumphrat.net/twins-tec...k-cartridge-kit-installation-with-photos.html
  20. LookoutMountainTiger

    LookoutMountainTiger Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 14, 2009
    Oddometer:
    129
    Location:
    Dekalb County, AL
    Very nice bike, what handlebars are you running?