Triumph Tiger 800

Discussion in 'British Beasts: Triumph Tigers' started by ScrambDaddy, Jul 12, 2010.

  1. bross

    bross Where we riding to?

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    Lots of people complain of this, but frankly when was the last time you had a flat. I know I'm probably jinxing myself now but I've been riding my DR, my wife her DR, my Scrambler, and now the Tiger for almost 10 years and the only time I'm changing a tube is at tire change time. I still carry spare tubes, irons etc. but have yet to need them. I just don't worry about it anymore.
  2. RichardU

    RichardU Let's Ride

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    Good point. I've not had any flats on my tubed bikes either. However, I have helped change three flats in the last two months, on other people's bikes, all KLRs, FWIW. And my wife has had three flats on her street bikes over the last eight years. Two were field repairable, but one put a 1/2" pipe through the tire. The only way I could have fixed that in the field is if it has been a tubed tire.

    So I don't wish too hard for tubeless. I mostly wanted to give the roadie riders something to be thankful for.:D
  3. browneye

    browneye PIN IT & BANG GEARS

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    +1
    My story as well.
    BTW, the XC is a very nice road bike. It's very planted and easy to ride at moderate speeds. The wide bars offset the little extra counter steer it needs for the big hoop. It has turned out to be everything I wanted, SOOOO glad I chose the XC. It is very plush. On the otherhand, at 170lbs I wouldn't want the forks any firmer for road. Brake dive is not nearly what I expected. Maybe my opinion will change after more miles than my measly 125, but I doubt it. The new bike is fantastic.


    Exactly. In 40 years of offroad and 12 on, I have only had one flat on the road. It was on the freeway with a tubeless so easy fix. I've changed a LOT of tires so I have no qualms about a patch fix in the field.

    The first thing I did when the XC got home was supplement the tool case with irons, patches, an enduro stand, and a 17mm hex for the front axle. Without a center stand or a bead breaker it's gonna be tough to break the bead. For longer trips a spare front tube is in order, would work in the rear in a pinch as well.

    I'm always amazed at riders who will pick up a nail in BFE. Like, where the hell did that come from? :lol3
  4. Mr_Chris

    Mr_Chris Get away, evil car!

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    I just went out into my garage to jump back and forth... initially I was gonna call bullshit on this as the Explorer tank feels much narrower when you go from the 800 to it. Trying to be understanding, the Explorer tank does flare out (in the same way the 800 does) a little further back, so if you stand, lock your knees and/or lean forward a bit, you can feel the flared out bit on your thighs a bit more than the XC. Seated, however, the flares are above your legs and it is a narrower tank than the XC.

    The slightly wider tank (I suppose that's where the 1 litre increase is hiding) seems to LOOK bigger with the colour-matched side panels as opposed to the obvious black plastics on the 800, and way up front they are wider, but you cannot "feel" it; there is no sensation of a large tank (no weight, or slosh), and no GSA-style bulge there.

    There are whole rant threads complaining about the smallness of the tank in fact -- not that you should believe anyone on the Interwebs...:evil
  5. Mr_Chris

    Mr_Chris Get away, evil car!

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    The softer suspension was only noticeable at first, now I quite enjoy that feeling. I find the Speed Triple hard and less comfortable now, even. And when I'm pushing it on the Speed, it's disconcerting to feel the front wheel "walk" as it starts to come free. But the XC has me high siding in tight turns, so when anything slides I just slide with a good centre of gravity. Not sure that's good roadcraft but it's how I deal with wet 50/50 tyres on low speed turns.

    And about that big wheel / wide bars thing. That was the strange part coming to the XC from the roadie. But even after trying a 990 adv, and a gs800, I noticed it more on the XC -- that different-ness. I thought about it a lot since being tall I wanted the bigger bike but that put me off a bit. Then I decided to push my limits and get the XC as something more different than the other bikes. Looking back, I realise that it was a great call for me, since the XC comes much more close to my dimensions for standing, sitting and time in the saddle (still is a bit short to stand even with the rox).

    You must ride in the proper lane position on the road. :rofl I tend to play the field and I had my first flat on my XC about 3 months into it. (screw in the rear/centre of the tyre) On my Rocket III I get them about every 6 months.

    I believe it is from living in a new houseing development and tradies dropping shyte all over the place. 12 years with one, you're a lucky guy IMO.:clap
  6. Mr_Chris

    Mr_Chris Get away, evil car!

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    Hi Tug,

    I'm not sure I'd buy an XC again. Just kidding!:rofl I haven't ridden a Dakar so I can't compare that directly. I am currently doing a complete and utter comparison of the Explorer in my garage (borrowed a week!) vs the XC in my garage, however. :evil

    Miliage wise, the triples are good if you're good. Get aggressive and zippy, gear down a notch and jack rabbit it around with a huge grin, and you'll see the difference, but otherwise I'm NEVER the first guy needing fuel, ever. (disclaimer, I don't seem to be riding with any GSA's at the moment lol) On midgrade Aussie fuel if I'm being a jackass hooning it up, I get 220 or a bit more out of a tank, which is til the light comes on plus 20k or so. If I'm flat topping it aceoss country on the way back home in the dark because I had been out too long doing that first bit, I get over 300, which makes my max range on tar to be 320 or so in my opinion, when I know the next fuel will definitely be where I expect it to be.:D

    Explorer I'm stull considering the differences... Thought I would love a shaft drive again like my Rocket has... but given the feel is so similar to the 800 I have not yet gotten fully accustomed to the powertrain. The final gear back there has a sound to it, the transmission is heavier, and the driveshaft "feel" (some call it "lash" but that's extreme to me) is all a bit foreign when the bars and position and such are so similar to the XC. On the road I don't feel the weight, but I can feel the added power... The seat is slightly lower than the XC but there's a high seat option (as opposed to a low seat option on XC). OFf-road I would feel the weight... Heaving it up on the centre stand for example.

    I like the mags, the computer toys, the single-sided swingarm. Notably the forks have preload adjustment unlike the XC.

    But after riding it around a bit the other day, I came back, hopped on my XC and had the desire to wash it up a bit, first time in months my XC's gotten pampered. So yeah, I love my XC. I want other things -- I'd like a smaller bike to throw around in really gnarly shit (and not have to rent at Garners), and I'm actually thinking a new Trophy with computer-o-rama for the road+wifey on back might be a better gap filler than an Explorer -- but despite all that, I just love the XC as my favourite... so far. :lol3 (been 1 year, on the second rego)

    hope this gives you something to think about.

    Chris
  7. Mr_Chris

    Mr_Chris Get away, evil car!

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    I scrape on the XC when I have a pillion... Solo, I touch my toes in many turns just as "feelers" and it's turned into what I do, though I've had to replace boots once for overdoing that.:lol3

    I guess if you have your own gravitational field, and/or have a cow of a pillion, and a soft suspension, you'd scrape any bike -- your fat arse is bottoming out the bike!:rofl The guy on the harley will have a stiffer, more heavy weight-rated suspension that can carry more, or has a bottom out at a higher clearance than the XC/roadie, or both?

    Damaging the bike (stand safety switch for example) is the bad part -- the design should prevent that IMO. But grinding things off is no indication of skill or a failure of the bike. It's probably just a sign to lay off the Big Macs, or the liquid calories. :1drink

    In my case it's that pesky touratech side stand foot that hits on the left side. And man, what a nasty sound it makes with the sheet material on edge. Sounds like I'm tearing it clean off! :eek1
  8. cug

    cug --

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    I had one. During a night ride on a country road with virtually no traffic, slight drizzle rain and it was freaking cold. And I had the blasted D606 on the rear, which is bear to get on / off when cold. It was a nightmare as I also did not have cell reception, which unfortunately isn't so rare in this wast country.

    After having spent about 2 or 3 hours there to get going again I wish to never ever repeat this. And this has nothing to do anymore with technique. Try to get a D606 rear on when it's around 5 degrees C (41F) and the tire has been sitting for the half hour you were patching the rear tube (because you gave your spare tube to someone who needed it during an offroad ride). I wish you fun and lots of patience. During these two hours exactly one car came by - obviously with some frightened women in there as it was speeding by like nuts with wide eyed people in there ...

    In hindsight, I should have just ridden to the next city on the flat tire ... would have been better than sitting there with the wheel / tire off in the cold and dark.
  9. live2ridetahoe

    live2ridetahoe RN

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    I used to have a 01 Dakar. It was my first bike. I rode 28000 miles in my first year. I loved that bike. The mileage was great and it was a very reliable bike for me. When I graduated from that bike, I bought a 950 Adventure. It was a great bike, but was too maintanence intensive. I sold it for a kitchen remodel.

    I just bought a 800XC last month. I love it. the mileage is better than the 950 Adventure and it remindes me of my Dakar, except that it has much more power and a bit less MPG. The suspension is better as well.

    I am super happy with the 800XC. I would never want to go with the Explorer because of the size and wt. I don't have a need for a huge DS bike like that. I like the midsize DS bikes.

    One more thing about the 800XC, the transmission and engine are buttery smooth. A big difference from my Dakar and Katoom.

    Just my $0.02....

    JG
  10. browneye

    browneye PIN IT & BANG GEARS

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    Why, yes I do. :lol3

    I'm still a skeerd street rider after all these years. Still hate blind corners.
    And anyway LEO's are all over out here and they don't take kindly to that shit. :1drink


    On the Explorer...I was looking at Tenere, GS, and 990 as well. All of these bikes were just too damn big for me. I'm goldie locks with the Tiger. :D
  11. browneye

    browneye PIN IT & BANG GEARS

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    On another note...I was asking about switched power for my GPS. So this morning I took the headlight off, it's a pretty big project as there's a bazillion fasteners to remove, and tapped into the parklamp harness. Removed the connector pins from the harness plug, pryed open the crimps, slipped on a length of shrink tubing, then crimped the GPS power leads to the pins and soldered them on. Shrinked and taped. Reassemble. Works stellar. Looks factory.

    Nice pieces and bits too. Tidy wiring. The quality is higher and stuff is made better than the japenese bikes. Very well sorted. Me likey. :thumb
  12. PYG RYDR

    PYG RYDR Adventure-Dual Sport

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    I am installing my HDB handguards and curious if others used the OEM bolts to anchor the bar ends; or did you remove the OEM handlbar inserts and use Paul's anchors and bolts?

    And how do you remove the OEM handlebar inserts?

    TIA
  13. Snapper

    Snapper Long timer

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    Did I mention I weight 150lbs and ride solo unladen? Preload was probably set around 25% when I lost the side stand switch. Was in a decent lean when a hidden mid corner dip bottomed me. Preload bumped up to 35-40% now which is about as high as I can go and still have some reasonably even compliance between front and rear suspension.
  14. 81husky

    81husky Been here awhile

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    They just unscrew. They have some type of thread locker on them, so they are a bit stubborn the first time.
  15. basepc

    basepc Adventurer

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    Anybody know if the Roadie has the same center stand as the XC? I am interested to know if the Roadie's cstand has rubber bumpers?? My Roadie's doesn't.
  16. Vzuke

    Vzuke Been here awhile

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    Compliments of Bike Bandit, here are the center stands for the Tiger.

    Since the XC is taller it has a taller center stand or as they say "Long" and the Roadie is "Short".

    You can see they did redesign the stands. I assume they did both of them but they only had the one XC stand on the web site. I bolted on the first model (top image) to my bike last year. It only has one bump stop attached to that No. 3 bracket.

    Looks like they redesigned the bump stop bracket along with the addition of the bump stops to the legs. I wonder where they contact, the swing arm? I'm too lazy to go down stairs and look.

    [​IMG]
  17. helotaxi

    helotaxi Been here awhile

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    Based on what others have posted, if you open the hole in the HDB guard up, you can use the OEM inserts.
  18. helotaxi

    helotaxi Been here awhile

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    And I'm in the 230# range running the XC through the twisties around 60 and nothing came close to dragging. Body position matters a lot.
  19. DAKEZ

    DAKEZ Long timer

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    He is talking about the Roadie (not XC)
  20. Mr_Chris

    Mr_Chris Get away, evil car!

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    Yeah that's one of those worst case scenarios. You're into something committed and then SURPRISE! and you know that's not good, cringing when you look etc.

    Hmm, Lateral G junkie? You might have other umm, complicating factors. :lol3