Triumph Tiger 800

Discussion in 'British Beasts: Triumph Tigers' started by ScrambDaddy, Jul 12, 2010.

  1. cug

    cug --

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    Not really oversimplified as those are penny articles sold for a lot of money. It's all about the bits and pieces that have to come off the bike to then require gasket / seal replacements.

    I wish all manufacturers could get to decent valve adjustment intervals like Yamaha with the Super Tenere or even the little WR250X/R. It feels like we are living in the stone age of engine design here ... Worst is the BMW boxer with 6k check intervals, at least it's a quick job per side. Not certain whether the new one is still like that.
  2. bross

    bross Where we riding to?

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    My beef is why can't they build a moto engine with hydraulic valves? I loved my Kawasaki Meanstreak with hydraulic valves and shaft drive. Maintenance entailed oil and tire changes. :clap It's not like we require high revving top end power in a Tiger or pretty much any street bike, give me a strong bottom end with lots of mid range and hydraulic valves. :deal

    Buell did it with the Uly, I just wish someone else would.
  3. Windy Rider

    Windy Rider Pussy Power

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    Yes it is very possible to drag the pegs, but you have to be really hooking to do it. I have done it twice in twelve months, scared the shit out of me. You have to have the right type of corner do do it, the first time was with road tyres and the second time was with nobbies on and loaded up with 20kg of luggage, but it was on a very tight corner and I was really going for it.
  4. bross

    bross Where we riding to?

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    I do it every once in awhile on one corner on my commute, a tight uphill switchback right hander. Have done it with the OEM TrailWings and even when I had TKC80s mounted for a dual sport ride. :eek1 The handling of the Tiger even with knobs continues to blow me away. :clap
  5. strider.deano

    strider.deano Been here awhile

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    You're right....I don't know and I wasn't there. No offense intended.

    Maybe I'm doing wrong, but I've only nicked a peg once or twice with the XC.

    After riding 4 or 5 of the XC competitors, I found the XC's ride and handling to be spot on for anything but the track. (Only the Ducati MS handled better!) The XC is rarely too soft for me. I do agree the brakes are not "well defined", just adequate.
  6. cug

    cug --

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    No offense taken. Just the typical response to "you're doing it wrong ..." ... :lol3

    I generally ride in a way that reduces the likelyhood, like shift body weight and such, but I'm not a "knee out, hang off" rider and the ergonomics of the Tiger don't support that well anyways.

    The main issue with this, as already mentioned, are bumps in the middle of a nice laid over corner. The softer the suspension the more you get additional compression there and the more likely you are to touch down.

    Therefore personally I think that lowering the XC combines the two downsides of XC and Roadie in a dangerous way: soft(er) suspension and low ground clearance. I never understood that. If the very basic layout of the bike doesn't fit you, why force it in a way that generally doesn't work very well? Lowered bikes all have issues in one way or another. You're likely to get better results with a bike that was meant to be low enough. But again, that might just be me.
  7. ducnut

    ducnut Long timer

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    If they're replacing the valve cover and plug hole O-rings with a valve check, find a new dealer, as those are reusable.

    It's all about the RPM. Hydraulic valvetrains simply can't be spun up. The bikes you note are cruisers, which won't even see the RPM where the triple starts coming on.
  8. marloweluke

    marloweluke The Flying Dutchman

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  9. amanlikemike

    amanlikemike Recoverin speedfreak

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    Saw this and thought of you FFs... :D

    <iframe width="640" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/OWwUZLuoh9U" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
  10. ducnut

    ducnut Long timer

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    I think you and I are probably similar, in riding styles and experience. I use Ferodo, on everything that I personally ride. Their Sinter Grip ST is a pad I think you should try. They can be a little noisy, but, they're very aggressive without the need for a lot of temperature. If that doesn't give you the lever feel you desire, you can easily swap a takeoff master cylinder from a more sporty Triumph. I'm not sure on all the piston diameters of each bike, but, that's where I'd be looking.
  11. ducnut

    ducnut Long timer

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    Definitely, nice bikes, even today.

    I no longer work in a dealership. Otherwise, I could verify exactly what it had. A quick web search shows that it had rocker arms, but, can't quickly find anything further.
  12. Poweranger

    Poweranger Been here awhile

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    While we are on the subject of brakes I have noticed my fronts produce a lot of brake dust. I'm still in the break in period but do not remember my other new bikes producing dust. Do these pads just produce dust at break in and then clean up later? Or are they just the cheaper ones that always produce lots of black dust?
  13. XCRider803

    XCRider803 Loftin' the wheel

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    Yep, my 650 Nighthawk from that era had hydrolic lifters, tensioner and shaft drive. Ran like a scaulded dog and never had to do anything to it.
  14. ducnut

    ducnut Long timer

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    I'm not exactly sure what the compound is. But, organic pads are the dustiest and least aggressive. Semi-metallic are less dusty and quite a bit more aggressive. Given the intended use of the XC, they're probably organic. If they're too aggressive, people always complain.
  15. kingofZroad

    kingofZroad Been here awhile

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    I wish the rear brake was more aggressive...
  16. blacktiger

    blacktiger Tigers R great.

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    They should be but according to the Triumph manual they're replaced on a service. I certainly won't be replacing them every time when I start doing it myself.
  17. blacktiger

    blacktiger Tigers R great.

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  18. blacktiger

    blacktiger Tigers R great.

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    Thing is, IMO, you don't want an aggressive front brake on a bike that's likely to be ridden on dirt. I think they got it right for the XC at least. That slight "mushy" feel gives the brake, er, feel. e.g. I can drag the front going down loose hills using my "brain ABS".
  19. ducatirdr

    ducatirdr Re-entry Noob

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    I have a KTM woods bike and it has excellent brakes with strong initial bite. The brakes feel like overkill on that machine. I adjust to them quickly and appreciate their strong, save my arse, initial bite stopping power. I wish my Triumph had that same inital bite. I'd rather have to back off, then feel like I need to squeeze the juice out of them. They have a feeling of being undersize for the machine to me. I'm sure there is a reason for this like you mention but I wish they had a bit stronger feel to them.
  20. KildareMan

    KildareMan Been here awhile

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    Try EBC HH pads.