Triumph Tiger 800

Discussion in 'British Beasts: Triumph Tigers' started by ScrambDaddy, Jul 12, 2010.

  1. y0y02369

    y0y02369 Long timer

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    Tried look it up but nothiing came up... What are "Ignition maps"?

    Thanks!
  2. bross

    bross Where we riding to?

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    Fuel injected bikes use a "map" to provide the proper amount of fuel based on throttle position and rpm. The computer or ECU checks all the inputs from it's sensors, looks up the value needed and sends the proper amount of fuel to the injectors based on the "map". If you use TuneECU, you can look at your current map and see the values. It basically just looks like a big spreadsheet with values for all rpm ranges from idle to red line. Here's a screenshot from TuneECU, that's your map...

    [​IMG]

    I just installed the latest map for the Tiger last week, 20653. The manufacturers will release updates to address running issues, and there's maps available if you run an aftermarket exhaust etc.
  3. y0y02369

    y0y02369 Long timer

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    Oooooh that makes sense! Kinda thought that was it! Thank you for the detailed response!

    How do you update this??
  4. Yossarian™

    Yossarian™ Deputy Cultural Attaché

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    Check out the freeware at http://www.tuneecu.com/
  5. Mr_Chris

    Mr_Chris Get away, evil car!

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    Be real careful just throwing stuff into your ECM off the Internet. Not saying anyone is doing anything bad, but you could cause problems with the motor, might even make it run badly or not at all.

    Considering your issue, the chance of a fuel map making your bars vibrate is a lot less than the chance the chain is over tight, or they changed a tyre and didn't balance a wheel properly, for example. It's actually hard to imagine a fuel map that runs great but somehow causes vibration in the bars, as the only negative side effect. I suppose there's a "win the lottery chance" of anything though!:lol3

    My Tiger runs sweet as, and all I do is update the map to the latest Triumph one for my configuration (Arrow pipe). TuneECU / fuel map changes are not the cure-all for problems with the bike.
  6. KildareMan

    KildareMan Been here awhile

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    Agree that the chain is probably too tight.
  7. Yankee Dog

    Yankee Dog Long timer

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    Remember, chains are to be adjusted while on the side stand. Not the center stand. Adjusting on the center stand will result in a tight chain. DAMHIK
  8. MotoTex

    MotoTex Miles of Smiles

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    Unless you find out what the correct play translates to when on the center stand, record it, and then set accordingly.

    Here's the method I've used for decades:


    1. Adjust chain properly. This can be done on the side stand as per the manual, or you can use a ratchet strap to compress the rear suspension until swingarm pivot, countershaft and axle are in line (the chain's tightest point in swingarm travel).
    2. Place the bike on the center stand.
    3. Take any tool from the bike's toolkit and find an identifiable spot (bolt, casting, seam, etc.) ~midway (where the most chain slack is) on the bottom of the swingarm to use as a reference. (or, mark a spot with a punch if nothing is readily available)
    4. Put the top end of the tool there and mark where the top of the chain crosses the tool. (Scribe, Sharpie, etc.)
    5. Lift the chain up and mark tool again where the top of the chain now crosses it.
    6. You now have a custom tool that provides an easy reference point for chain tension measurement on the center stand. (I've done this for years for many chain drive bikes)
  9. swimmer

    swimmer armchair asshole

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    I know this is traditionally the case esp. with dirt bikes with longer travel but as I mentioned a few posts back this is not the case for me with my roadie. The chain is tighter when on the center stand. Is it really different on the XC or are people relying on past bike's experience to make that assumption. I'm just curious.
  10. y0y02369

    y0y02369 Long timer

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    Definitely agree with you! I am just curious to know what it is. But when it comes to a bike like this, trial and error costs too much with things i don't know enough about 

    My first thought with the issue was the chain as well! :lol3




    I've also always heard and read to do it on the kickstand but as time goes and do maintenance on more and more bikes, i've personally learned that it varies. My xr250l and klr were both on kickstand but some of my friends' road bikes were centerstand... it just depends. I haven't purchased my tiger yet, will be when they get a white one in stock so i can't speak for that...:ricky
  11. MotoTex

    MotoTex Miles of Smiles

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    The chain is at the tightest point when the countershaft, swingarm pivot and rear axle are in line. At that point there should be free play in the chain. About an inch or so. Unfortunately there is no easy way to get things lined up to make this a convenient method.

    When you put it on the sidestand there is nothing magical about it. In fact it likely introduces more variables.

    Is the parked bike fully unloading the shock?

    Partially unloaded, but to what degree?

    Is the bike on a slope that might affect the suspension load?

    Is there luggage affecting the shock compression?

    All of this will affect the chain tension when on the sidestand, though probably only slightly. However, this is how most riders will have to check the chain, so the manufacturer give specs to do it this way that probably have quite a bit of margin for error built in.

    Bottom line, better to err on the side of too much slack rather than too tight of a chain. :deal
  12. BlackBeast

    BlackBeast Been here awhile

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    Looking to install a set of Rox risers on my Tiger 800. Please can someone let me know the size of the allen head that is needed for the upper 2 bolts. Noticed that I don't have that particular size in my tool kit, so need to get just that specific size and instead of making a few trips to HD, thought I would check here.
  13. cug

    cug --

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    Bolts are:

    M8X1.25X30,SLV
    M10X1.25X60

    Meaning you need a 6mm and an 8mm allen. I'd get something like this and be done with it. I actually have all the sockets I need but they are from similar sets just a different manufacturer (Hazet in my case - I always buy tools when I'm in Germany or have friends bring them when they are coming to visit ... :lol3).
  14. BlackBeast

    BlackBeast Been here awhile

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    Great, thanks Cug. :clap
  15. Yankee Dog

    Yankee Dog Long timer

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    I am speaking from experience. The chain is significantly tighter when adjusted on the center stand.

    The other day I had it up on the centerstand and decided to check the chain tension. Hmmm... a bit loose. So I whipped out the tools and adjusted to the loose end of the spec like I always do. Finished up and dropped it off the center stand. Then checked it one more time.

    Whoaa. Way too tight. Check the manual. Sure enough, check on side stand. Readjust and move it back to where is was in the first place.
  16. Mercury264

    Mercury264 Once you go Triple...

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    It's only significantly tighter if you adjust it to the specs which states it is to be adjusted on the side-stand.

    You can adjust a chain on the center OR side stand and it be in spec, you just have to be aware of the procedure. It's poppcock to say you can't adjust the chain on the center stand - that's how I've always done it.

    On a related note, I'll take a slightly loose chain over a tight one any day...
  17. MotoTex

    MotoTex Miles of Smiles

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    This is exactly what I was trying to convey in that procedure above to make a tool that shows the spec for adjusting on the centerstand.

    As the swingarm rotates further down, the chain will be more slack than it would on the sidestand and this must be taken into account.

    Adjust it to spec on the sidestand, then put it on the centerstand and measure the freeplay for the NEW spec to be used whenever adjusting it on the centerstand and you are golden.

    Not exactly rocket science, but it can be confusing when how the slack changes at different points of suspension travel isn't fully realized.
  18. Yankee Dog

    Yankee Dog Long timer

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    Take a chill pill my friend. I was only answering the gentlemens question. I never said one shouldnt take your most accurate advice. I only said there was indeed a difference.

    I also agree that it is best to run a chain on the loose side.
  19. some call me...tim

    some call me...tim Been here awhile

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    While on the subject of chain adjustment, has anyone noticed their adjustment blocks on the swingarm not being symmetrical? I had the back wheel off the other weekend to put new tires on, and when we were getting everything reinstalled, my buddy noticed that the adjuster blocks were significantly different in their position on the swingarm.

    On the left side, you can see that the block is just a couple millimeters from the end of the swingarm:
    [​IMG]

    Whereas on the right side, there's a good half inch from the end of the swingarm:

    [​IMG]

    We measured the axle to swingarm pivot over and over, and everything seems to be correct there, but it seems weird that they'd be spaced so differently. :huh
  20. swimmer

    swimmer armchair asshole

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    OK. Then there appears to be a difference between the Roadie (or at least my bike with -2 in the back plus lifting links) and the XC.

    FWIW, I am fully aware of how to adjust my chain etc... I was just interested in this data point for the XC.