TUbliss on a Dualsport/Adventure Bike?

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by kthpick, Mar 18, 2010.

  1. WayneC

    WayneC Long timer

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    That explains a few things, did wonder about the slow air loss from the tyre air cavity reported by a number of people
  2. GurgaonTrails

    GurgaonTrails Adventurer

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    So nobody wants to answer that?
    BTW, I'm not asking about how good the system is - I'm sold on it. Just an installation question.
  3. BillMoore

    BillMoore Been here awhile

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    On my KLX250S on both rims, there was already a hole that was within a half inch of where the tubliss located the second hole, so I just moved the tube a little and enlarged that hole and used it.

    On my wife's CRF230L, the rear rim had a second hole, but it was way farther apart (but not exactly opposite either). I just enlarged it and am using it. I don't see how it can make any difference, it is very easy to relocate the high pressure tube to wherever you need it to be relative to the larger valve stem. On her rim there was no second hole, so I drilled it to match up with the tubliss placement.

    I have about 1500 miles on my Tubliss setup. My wife's bike has had it for less than 100 miles though, just did hers a couple of weeks ago...
  4. dirtyoffroad

    dirtyoffroad Been here awhile

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    that is probably why it is suggested to use some sort of sealant like slime
  5. buelless

    buelless Been here awhile

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    tubliss website says to space 4 spokes apart or you will damage the inner bladder during tire changes.
  6. GurgaonTrails

    GurgaonTrails Adventurer

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    Aha, that's it...it's not a problem "operating", it's tire changes. I remember the multiple reminders to start at the rim-lock....So that's cool. Take extra care in mounting/dismounting tires and the system and the two valve holes could be anywhere.
  7. n16ht5

    n16ht5 ride the night

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    I have them opposing each other. Just fine.




    A
  8. TNC

    TNC Candyass Camper

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    Three years for me too at this point. I think I've been through 5 rear tires and 3 fronts and am installing new ones at the moment on the original Tubliss setup. In 3 years I've no issues, leaks, or flats. I run DOT knobbies with Stan's sealant. This is on a KLX300S street legal bike used on decently gnarly off road and pavement at 60mph and a little faster occasionally.
  9. milzispete

    milzispete who did what where?

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    i thought the dynabead idea was a good one but it got me thinking where was the best place to put them. if running sealent in your main tire then i guess the only place to put the dynabeads is in the tubliss bladder. how much do you think it would take to balance the wheel ?
  10. Wadester

    Wadester Rides a dirty bike

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    Dynamic balancing is a good idea, but you don't have to use dynabeads. As long as you've got something that will move inside the tire and has enough mass, you're good. Sealant works just fine as a a flowing mass to dynamically balance your wheel. The biggest issue with this is having enough mass to cover any imbalance - the TuBliss valve block is relatively light, but is heavier than the rest. I recall putting in 4oz of sealant and running 70mph/highway without noticeable vibes. Sealant dries over time, but will accumulate where it needs to be for balance IMHO.
  11. TNC

    TNC Candyass Camper

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    If using Slime I would agree. However, something like Stan's sealant is relatively clean and at least equal to or better than Slime. I've used both in my Tubliss setup. Cleanup when changing to a new tire was messy with the Slime and not with the Stan's. If I didn't use sealant, I've had numerous situations where I would have had a flat without it...a nail, wire, mesquite thorns, etc. In the case of the nail incident, I plugged the hole when I pulled out the nail, but amazingly the sealant seemed to seal the hole. I went ahead and plugged the spot with a common string plug just to insure the fix. I ran that tire until it was toast.
  12. Wadester

    Wadester Rides a dirty bike

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    I actually use a homebrew sealant composed of latex mold builder, Slime, antifreeze and water. Similar to, but better than Stan's NoTubes sealant. I had a nail puncture a while back - the sealant held air pressure after pulling the nail, but I kept having a persistent wet spot there. Put a string in it, and it's all dry.
  13. UtahFox

    UtahFox Been here awhile

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    This is a non-issue these days, there are a few choices other than Slime that are water soluble such as Stan's or Ride-On.

    http://www.ride-on.com/motorcycle-formula-mot.html
  14. milzispete

    milzispete who did what where?

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    We are talking about running a tubliss on dualsport bikes right ?
    The advantages are vastly reduced chance of pinch flats and sealant can be used to fix against nail/wire/thorns if you wish to use it. Another advantage of sealant would be dynamic balancing of your wheel meaning no more mega weights to offset the rim lock

    I'm struggling to find a downside vs a tube set up here.
  15. seabee1

    seabee1 we build, we fight

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    you can run a sealant if you want to with the tubliss system, but really, all you need is a plug kit and a mini compressor.

    another advantage of the tubliss is running crazy low pressures for great traction. just watch out for dinging your rims.
  16. TNC

    TNC Candyass Camper

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    So...you're "that guy". You know...that guy everyone else who has sealant in their Tubliss setup has to wait on while he plugs his tire.:lol3
  17. seabee1

    seabee1 we build, we fight

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    yep. that's me. i've only had to plug a tire twice in the last four years of riding. if that's an inconvinience for you, don't go riding with me! :lol3

    once you start changing your own tires, you'll appreciate not having sealant in there. water clean up or no, it's still a mess.

    ymmv
  18. TNC

    TNC Candyass Camper

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    "Once I start changing my own tires?"...LOL! No, I've been changing my own tires for over 40 years...and a lot of tires for others when I worked part time at a motorcycle shop for 15 years to pay for some of my nasty 2-wheel habits.:D

    But seriously, I mentioned Stan's because the stuff really works, and you don't get the goshawful mess that you do with something like Slime. I've been using it in my dirtbike tires for about 3.5 years now and way longer in mountainbike tires. For something that really seals a hole, it is amazingly clean stuff. I agree that because of the way the inner liner seals the tire bead, a plug fix works wonders on the trail because you don't have to worry about a quick, high volume air supply to seat the bead. Still, when I've changed the many tires over that 3.5 year period on my dirt bike, I've almost always found things stuck in the tire that probably would have yielded a needed fix in the field. It's nice to keep on riding.
  19. DuncR6

    DuncR6 n00b

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    I just wanted to say thanks to all that have posted in here. I was fairly sold on the Tubliss, and but it helped a lot to read this entire thread. I also liked the Tubliss Long Term Review thread here. Finally pulled the trigger and bought some myself yesterday. Can't wait to try them out and post anything additional here to help others in the future.
  20. Capt. Egregious

    Capt. Egregious Been here awhile

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    Well, my experience with Tubilss started off very well. The first year they worked great. Fantastic traction with out the worry of flat problems. Ran them on my XRR and my 300 with no issues. After around a year the red liner broke down and ruptured the inner bladder on both bikes:eek1. So you should watch the liner and bladders for wear after you put some miles on em. Now running double rim locks and HD tubes on the XRR and double rim locks with bibs on the 300.