Two Minutes of Terror

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by LisaS, May 7, 2013.

  1. Dismount

    Dismount Boring bastard

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    I would have copiously shit myself. As it ran down my legs it would have hopefully lowered the cog.
    #21
  2. shaddix

    shaddix Banned

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    In a car, if a tire suddenly fails, you're supposed to accelerate hard, but I don't remember why, I also doubt it would be the best thing to do on a bike
    #22
  3. Hawk62cj5

    Hawk62cj5 2 Cheap 4 a KLR

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    You stayed upright so you did the right thing in my book . We all forget to look at our tires every now and then so dont beat your self up about , just remember to look at them more often:D
    #23
  4. Turbo Ghost

    Turbo Ghost Been here awhile

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    Obviously, everything worked out fine so, congratulations! The one thing I gather from your post that might have made the experience less harrowing would have been to pull the clutch in as soon as the blowout occurred. When the blowout occurred, the wheel was being driven and then, when you rolled of the throttle (the correct thing to do) it was being dragged or at least it became a negative force slowing you down. If you had pulled the clutch in immediately, the rear tire would have been allowed to free-wheel and you could have used the front brakes more aggressively with less chance of the rear coming around. Had the tube wrapped around and locked-up the rear wheel, the clutch wouldn't have made any difference. It's always a good idea to disengage the clutch anytime there is a rear-wheel problem.
    I had an instance where an engine siezed on me and locked the rear up at about 50mph. I instantly pulled the clutch and the rear-wheel released and I was able to stop normally and pull off the road.
    Glad you came out ok! Ride safe!
    #24
  5. OrangeYZ

    OrangeYZ Been here awhile

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    Uh what?

    You're going 50mph.
    Tire goes flat.
    You want to change it.
    Need to be going 0 mph so you can get out and change it without tearing your arms off and skipping down the road.
    Why would you go up to 60 mph before going back through 50 mph to get to 0 mph?
    #25
  6. High Country Herb

    High Country Herb Adventure Connoiseur

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    Other than overlooking the flat/low tire, it sounds like you did everything right. On top of that, it sounds like you have excellent balance skills to recover from the slide. Ever consider racing supermotard?

    As far as braking, I would not recommend using the front brake with a rear flat. Unloading the rear tire will only make it more likely to come around. Engine braking is helpful, and rim locks would keep the tire from spinning on the rim.

    Like you said, had you been coming into a curve at speed, it would have been a priority to slow down. With a flat, I would stand it up and use the front brake, trying to keep the rear in place with steering input if it started to get out of line.

    Congrats, you are a good rider.:deal
    #26
  7. shaddix

    shaddix Banned

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    No idea, sounded stupid to me at the time but it was in mythbusters or something on discovery channel...
    #27
  8. LisaS

    LisaS Dubious Adventurer

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    Vet Body on the back of the truck and it looked like he had a student with him in front- so probably he wouldn't have been much help anyway.
    We are about 15 minutes from Newport.

    Definitely wiser:nod Thanks for the kind words.

    I think I came pretty close:lol3
    #28
  9. LisaS

    LisaS Dubious Adventurer

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    :eek1

    Definitely will be checking them every time from now on!

    By the time I came to a stop the tube was wrapped around the rear tire. Thinking back I think I did pull in the clutch when I rolled off the throttle because that is what I usually do. Basically had to ride it until it got to the bottom of the hill and started to slow. My sense the whole time is that if I touched breaks it was not going to end well, but on the other hand that was m feeling until I finally came to a full stop.
    #29
  10. LisaS

    LisaS Dubious Adventurer

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    Thanks!

    My husbands advice is the same as I am getting here to stop beating my head against the wall- so therefore I am going to take it as a learning experience (that I wish never to repeat) and move foreward.
    I think the bit of dirt riding that I do did help in this situation- so definitely need to spend more time this summer working on my dirt skills and getting more comfortable with the back end sliding.
    #30
  11. HooliKen

    HooliKen Awesome is a flavor

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    "Vet Body" :lol3

    We lived in Bangor and Hampden when I was a kid. Bangor when our house out near Beech Hill Pond in Otis was being built and Hampden for a bit,

    A-Yuh. It was wicked good, I tell ya.
    #31
  12. Harpua

    Harpua formerly josdavlar

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    i had a front flat about 10 years ago with my ex-girlfriend on the back (:lol3). we were on an interstate.

    at first i thought she was leaning really hard to one side, so i was working against that. i suppose that was the tire schmooshing off the rim. i had started taking an exit to check things out when the rim hit the pavement and all hell broke loose. the bike immediately went down, i was sliding on my hands and knees and the gf was on my back.

    we had just enough gear so that we were ok... but not my knees. the jeans were useless. my knees were de-skinned (thankfully not de-boned) and the next month was horrible showers, terrible stairs, painful walking and awful sleep.

    i quit riding after that, only to get another bike a couple years ago. now i'm determined to always have gear that will protect me as much as possible.

    dummies who don't do ATGATT have no idea what sliding 200 feet on pavement will do to them. it ain't pretty, and it's a whole mountain of sugarcoating to call it "road rash."

    btw, after the cops and the fire trucks, the ambulance finally showed up. they told me they don't usually rush to motorcycle accidents because the rider is usually dead. they were surprised to see me alive. can you believe that sh*t?
    #32
  13. LisaS

    LisaS Dubious Adventurer

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    We are about half an hour from Bangor- we try to avoid it as much as possible- it has changed a lot over the past 10-15 years- and definitely not for the better!

    Glad to hear you were both ok!!

    We are always ATGATT- so glad I did not need to test it out though! My husband came close to testing his last year around this time- we were riding home from the Whitehorse Gear open house when a deer jumped across his front fender- He ended up taking an off road excursion on his WeeStrom- fortunately, he was able to keep it upright and only ended up with a bent rim &flat on the rear.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    (note: large rocks, while making for an interesting pic, are not very effective at straightening bent rims- hammer is advised)

    Obviously the gear isn't going to protect you 100%- a friend of ours lost a son who was in full gear when he veered into the side of a pick up truck- but we feel it at least puts the odds more in your favor for having less severe injuries.

    Not just for safety though, also for comfort- I always wonder when I am riding on a cold morning how the folks in jeans with no gloves or helmet manage to avoid frost bite and hypothermia. Also I have had road debris and large bugs ping loudly off my full face helmet that definitely would have hurt had they made contact with my skin- guess I am just a wuss:lol3
    #33
  14. vorg

    vorg Adventurer

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    First off I am glad your alright. :clap I have had a couple rear blow outs back in my hooligan days, both at relatively low speeds. Later in life a front blow out on a 700 pound Harley. That one was memorable... I still feel my dirt riding experience is the only thing that kept the bike upright.

    You did good... let off the power pull the clutch and roll it out. :norton

    Secondly, are we going to ride this year or what ? Next weekend is booked, but let Jerry know I am waiting for the word. :evil
    #34
  15. Harpua

    Harpua formerly josdavlar

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    i came late to the dirt party, but man do i agree with this now.
    #35
  16. IrishJohn

    IrishJohn Adventurer

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    my knees were de-skinned (thankfully not de-boned) and the next month was horrible showers, terrible stairs, painful walking and awful sleep.

    Thank you for writing this part in particular - I've become a bit lazy about wearing my riding pants for 'short' trips...not any more. :eek1
    #36