Ty350

Discussion in 'Trials' started by BruceD_500, Apr 7, 2014.

  1. BruceD_500

    BruceD_500 n00b

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    Hi all I'm kinda new here and new to trials. I just picked up a TY350 today and of course it has a few issues. The shifter is entirely too long and the kick starter is entirely too short. The shifter I'll fix with a cut and weld since that's what was done by the previous owner. The kicker I need some help with. the original fell off. I'm reading many do , has anyone found an expectable replacement? It currently has one from a Sherco on it but it's way too short.
    Also the air screw has fallen out of the carb at some point. I've got a bucket of old Mikuni air screws with 50 or more air screws from other carbs, but with out knowing what the original TK screw tip looked like I was hesitant about sticking a Mikuni screw in there and trying to adjust it properly. So I put one in that fits but left it about 3 turns out. Has anyone got one they could take a photo of ?? Other than that it runs quite well.
    It will need the brakes and controls gone over. The cables look rough and the adjusters are at the limits. Oh by the way I'm not new to bikes but I am new to trials bikes. I just plan on playing in the back yard with this one.

    [​IMG]
    #1
  2. lineaway

    lineaway Long timer

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    #2
  3. BruceD_500

    BruceD_500 n00b

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    Thanks I wondered why I felt like I was shifting the front axle instead of the transmission. I think I'll be able to work the one I've got to fit similar to that one. I was surprised to see that it didn't have a Mikuni carb I've got allot of carbs around so if it gives me troubles I'll try something different. I'm assuming a 26VM would be appropriate does anyone have jetting specs for something like that ? In the mean time I guess I'll order the correct air screw. The carb looks good otherwise now that it's clean.
    #3
  4. lamotovita

    lamotovita Ageing Adventurer

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    I have an NOS kick lever for sale.
    PM me if interested.
    #4
  5. BruceD_500

    BruceD_500 n00b

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    PM sent
    #5
  6. Thats_a_Five

    Thats_a_Five Adventurer

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    I had one of those a few years ago. Got it in similar condition, except I had to clean the rodent den out of the air box before it would start!

    What a torque monster. You can just tractor up a hills or use it to pull tree stumps out of the ground.

    FYI, in trials, the shift pedal is usually mounted away from the footpeg so you don't risk knocking it out of gear while in a section. Either long enough to be clear of your toe or high enough to be out of harms way. If you are going to replace it, get one with a folding tip. I think it was on my TY350 that I cut and welded a folding tip on the brake side as well.

    That is a great bike for learning or for riding around the farm. Sold mine when I get a "modern" GasGas. I really don't recall any problems with mine, just regular maintenance items.

    Have fun!
    #6
  7. BruceD_500

    BruceD_500 n00b

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    Thanks , the previous owner has welded the folding tip on already I think I've discovered from everyones advice that I just need to tip up on a 45deg. angle and get used to it ?
    Still looking for a used kicker btw.

    Thanks
    Bruce
    #7
  8. slicktop

    slicktop Been here awhile

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    That seems like such a cool bike to own. I had a DT250 back in the day and it was a brute, I would like to have it now in the same condition.:1drink
    The TY looks really sleek.
    #8
  9. motobene

    motobene Motoing for 44 years

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    They were good bikes at the time. I owned several and modified a 250 version quite extensively for modern suspension and handling. I could still compete on that bike today and be happy. That was a super traction bike with the huge flywheel mass!

    They definitely had their weirdness too, like terrible sounding, hot running pinging motor in the 350 (because Americans love big things). They run better if you take out the copper head gasket and just use silicone gasket sealer. The reason is the squish was way more open than the more ideal 1mm and detonation resulted. The 250 was the better top end overall, but it was available only briefly in 1984. The 85 350 was the most common in USA. The 86 350 has an improved KYB shock with a reservoir.

    Handling and ergonomics are old world. High pegs, bar mounts too far back, swing arm too short, raked out. The foot pegs are horrid tiny things. And the bike are heavy. Lots of steel instead of aluminum, and the bottom end is related to the YZ490. Very chunky. No lack of flywheel mass for sure! Balky shifting. The drum brakes work OK if you maintain them perfectly. The gold anodized rims can corrode inside badly if you ride in a corrosive environment.

    But you could hardly kill one.
    #9
  10. BruceD_500

    BruceD_500 n00b

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    The foot pegs were one of the first things I noticed... They're bad!
    #10
  11. lineaway

    lineaway Long timer

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    The `86 was much better. I started with an 86. Had several through the years. Last one I had was a clean `85 , installed the `86 shock, 84 yz front wheel and brake. Also about 16 oz off the fly wheel. Still could win our expert class in 1995. The best bike ever. That mono changed everything.
    #11
  12. motobene

    motobene Motoing for 44 years

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    We look back on it and think 'crude bike' these days. But you are right. The Yamaha TY mono did solidly alter the course of trials. That was Yamaha. Bring out the best at the time, run a few model years, then bail of the of the US market. They are still strong in Japan with a 4-stroke, and also some top riders there, but they don't bother much exporting. Too small a market for big old Yamaha, apparently.
    #12
  13. Gordo83

    Gordo83 Been here awhile

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    I have an 85 and love it. The only problem I have is keeping the rear tire from popping off the bead with less than 12 pounds in it. On my true Vintage bike, with steel rims, I can run 5 or 6 pounds no problem.
    #13
  14. lineaway

    lineaway Long timer

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    It`s not the rim, it`s your tire.
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  15. Gordo83

    Gordo83 Been here awhile

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    I'm running a Dunlop D803 on the TY. The one I can go down to 5 pounds with, on my Vintage bike with steel rims, is a Michelin. So if I put a Michelin on the TY do you think I could run 5 pounds?
    Oddly enough the steel rims are Dunlop rims. The rims on the TY are stock gold anodized aluminums. Not sure of the brand.
    #15
  16. oldyams

    oldyams Adventurer

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    I have been running a hand me down tubeless Michelin radial with a tube for a few years now on mine without ever a problem, even when I have the pressure so low that other riders tell me my tires flat. I did the same on my ty250 twinshock.
    #16