Ultra rugged Kyocera phones,GPS smartphones ..my guide

Discussion in 'GPS 101 - Which GPS For Me' started by PDX Alamo, Feb 19, 2017.

  1. MrMac

    MrMac Long timer

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    I dunno.. I can count on one hand the number of times I've used .gpx files for navigation. I do almost all my planning on the device (usually CoPilot) so I don't need a computer. The last few multi-day trips I've taken, I just left my laptop at home and use my phone & tablet. And paper maps! Been doing it this way since '05 when I started using a Windows mobile PDA for navigation.

    I think people who come from the Garmin world have a different perspective, having to use their desktop software for planning because doing it on the Garmin just sux (so I hear!).. If I want to follow a .gpx (usually from another source), I just load it into Locus and run with that, or convert it to a .trp file (CoPilot format). Having said this, it would be nice if CP would include that function..
  2. Shawnee Bill

    Shawnee Bill Long timer

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    That's what was missing, if you can convert a .gpx to a format CoPilot accepts (.trp) then that should be as good as importing a .gpx

    I generally don't plan much, I just have a few destinations in mind and go. Then depending on how much time I have I wander around going in the general direction of my target.

    However I do follow other riders tracks I download in .gpx format when riding "off road" so being able to somehow use those is mandatory. I use OsMand+ on the Husky but I have the BMW Nav5 (some model of Garmin) on the GS which I control with the BMW wonder wheel, nothing comes close to that.
  3. MrMac

    MrMac Long timer

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    I should probably add that the conversion from .gpx to .trp (using ITNconverter or Route Converter) may not be as clean as you might want, which is why I just just Locus. I have not tried the Android 'Route Converter' app yet.. May have to look into that...!
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  4. ohgood

    ohgood Just givver tha berries !!!

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    I think this is one of the biggest reasons that people coming from the old Garmin (requiring a computer to store tracks, import/export maps/tracks/waypoints, and generally keep the device updated, one ride at a time) way of using two devices to do one operation believe they can't do it without a computer being involved.

    They're used to only keeping one ride /route/waypoints/map on the device at a time, because it's so difficult to organize things, or plan a ride on them.

    I've heard several people that started GPS usage with Garmin devices say things like:
    "that track is on my computer at home, I'll have to pull it up next weekend and look"
    or
    "I have all those tracks on my work computer"
    or
    "I'll piece those tracks together when I get time next weekend"

    or similar. they're standing there with a stand alone GPS in one hand, and a modern smartphone in the other, but the idea that "hey, this should be possible/easy to just DO right now with all this computing power!" just doesn't enter into the right process.

    it's not their fault, is just that they are used to waiting until they have a few hours to plug things into a desktop computer with all their tracks/waypoints in one place, and then move things around.

    any attempt to show them that thousands of miles of routes and tracks (along with maps) can be easily stored /recalled/navigated in any other manner just glazes the eyes over, and after a few seconds lends to "I'll check this out at home this weekend"... meaning the old way.

    it's even more frustrating when sitting at a washed our bridge, and they stab at the GPS screen for twenty minutes, when you're looking at a perfectly good work around, complete with satellite imagery, waypoints along the way, and ready to share it... but know it will be dismissed/discounted because " that's not real, it's just a smartphone app"

    I've learned it's better to just wait, maybe have some water and a snack while they argue with the electronics, and gingerly point out a road that works when they find the next impassable point... but you have to be careful, if you mention "I just found this easier way" you're a jerk/smart ass/etc that isn't a team player. or something. I'm not really sure how this parts work. ;-)
    ygal, Emgo and MrMac like this.
  5. wbbnm

    wbbnm Long timer

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    I do lots of long trips with a lot of planning on my computer. I load gpx files with tracks to the gps device and navigate that way. These are off-pavement roads in remote areas.

    I bought this phone as a backup for my Garmin Montana. It looks like Osmand or Locus will get the job done for gpx track navigation. I do little or no address lookup navigation on the gps.

    For now I don't have any more patience to learn another navigation software package. I might revisit this during the winter.
  6. Turbominivanman

    Turbominivanman Single track anyone?

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    So is this the correct CoPilot app? Screenshot_20170901-065606.png
  7. MrMac

    MrMac Long timer

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  8. MrMac

    MrMac Long timer

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    I think that is the free version? Some functionality may be disabled. An in-app purchase would add to that.. Only $7.00 for the full version (without traffic, which is a little extra)..
  9. DaMonk45

    DaMonk45 I B Da Monk

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    you can use several different programs to take your gpx file and turn it into a copilot route which you can move to your phone and follow.
  10. Albie

    Albie Kool Aid poisoner

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    I've found Here We Go to actually be more accurate than GM in my area. It also works flawlessly offline. It's my go to for auto routing and poi stuff.
  11. Turbominivanman

    Turbominivanman Single track anyone?

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    MrMac, Yes it is the free version. I don't mind paying, I just wanted to make sure it was the correct one, from the right developer.
    Thanks for confirming!
  12. Shawnee Bill

    Shawnee Bill Long timer

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    I can plan routes while riding on my BMW Garmin. Pretty easy, but really not smart from a safety viewpoint. Just set the cruise control and start looking up places I think I want to go, add via points to force the route to a better looking road, rearrange via points to suit or just let the Garmin arrange them. Touch screen works really good with any pair of gloves on. Not sure about saving what I've done as a route but I think I can. At any rate the Garmin will save my tracks which are easy to download once I get home and that can be easily converted to a route if I want.

    On my other bikes I use my Nomu and Osmand+ which forces me to pull over, take off my gloves to do much with it, which from a safety viewpoint is a good thing. It works and all told (phone, memory chip, software, mounting cradle, charge cord, etc.) was about $500+ cheaper than my BMW Garmin so I'm happy with that. When asked I ALWAYS recommend using a smart phone instead of spending the money on a Garmin unless it's for a BMW rider who is willing and able to spend a lot of money for a little convenience. Most of my life I could not do that.

    But I still put off whatever I can until I get to a desktop computer with a mouse. I do things on my phone that I can do on a desktop but it's more like a bandaid until I can get to a big screen. I also use a iPad for some things but nothing compares to a desktop with a large screen and a mouse. Nothing. And it's so much easier to manipulate tracks, routes and files on a desktop than using ANY software I've seen on a phone or tablet. I can do it on a phone but it's awkward at best.

    BTW, I do pull over on the BMW when I feel I need to do more than just add or change a couple of details on my route.
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  13. Turbominivanman

    Turbominivanman Single track anyone?

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    So here is where I am at. I am looking for the best value. I don't want the cheapest thing out there, unless of course it has all the features I need. I want something that is the best bang for the buck. Something that lasts quite a long time, is cheap to update, easy to find mounting for, and easy to use. Sounds like a cell phone for a GPS is great for me. I do quite a bit of backpacking and outdoor activities and could use this for more than just my ktm adventures.
  14. Turbominivanman

    Turbominivanman Single track anyone?

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    So does anyone know someone that has a Sonim XP7? Looks like one of the best rugged phones out there.
  15. Turbominivanman

    Turbominivanman Single track anyone?

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    Never mind. . . . Looked up the specs on the phone a little more, not real good. Kyocera takes the Cake and is the best value
  16. wbbnm

    wbbnm Long timer

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    I bought a new XD on Amazon a while back for $72. It isn't the latest model, but it looks like it is going to get the navigation job done. I was pleased with the price and total cost of software, SD card, mount, and a few cables.
  17. Eatmore Mudd

    Eatmore Mudd Mischief on wheels.

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    Best bang for the buck, lasts a long time, free to update, easy mounting, and easy to use. Yah man that's any DuraForce right there. Pick your model.
    TL;DR the best couple hundred bucks you can spend on consumer electronics.




    O.k disclosure and some context for ya.

    I don't do all the social streaming apps games and crap that's what computers are for so NO WAY was I gonna drop mega bucks to get a smart phone just to talk text and take pics. Way way to expensive and the battery life SUCKS. No way.
    Unless
    ..they got IP68 waterproof, MIL STD 805G rugged, stand alone GPS, day light readable and run for a least a whole day or more before needing a re charge AND the price came down to under three hundred bucks. Well that day came.

    All my flip phones were Kyocera and Motorolla. Work horses. Based on past experiences I trust both companies to make good communication tools.

    One buddy did all the social streaming apps games and crap on his DuraForce Brigadier until he crushed it ( long story) I found this thread checked the prices and pulled the trigger on a Duraforce Pro. My pal the phone crusher replaced his Brigadier with a Pro when he crushed his and saw my Df Pro.

    Our other pal was familiar with the phone crushers ( now dust) Brigadier. He checked out our Pros, tossed his S Edge and got a shiny new XD.
    The XD would probably be better for my needs but I went with the Pro instead for three reasons.
    1. The quartz crystal glass screen ( Verizon only version)
    2. it fits in the pocket of all of my riding jackets. ( XD was too big for the pocket of one jacket)
    3. the screen resolution is just a little bit higher.

    Both the XD and Pro are work horse tough. Mine works in the rain and with gloves. They have run time, processor speed and number crunching power that businesses and social streaming apps games and crap junkies need to stay profitable or entertained so I should be good to go for the next ten years.

    An added deal clincher is the audio. It blows everything else right out of the water. Period.
    The microphone gets me compliments on the volume and clarity and sound quality when I make calls. The speakers in speaker mode are LOUD. The 13MP action cam is quite good IMHO but I'm only just scratching the surface of that.

    I'm still getting the hang of this thing and the nav apps. For running around the woods on foot I got a power bank for just in case my few days turns into longer and I always carry a waterproofed paper map, two compasses and my Motorola flip phone as a back up.

    Sweetening the deal for me is I don't have to use Basecamp so I don't have to drag along a laptop and updates are free. The down side for me is I have to learn this stuff. My other buddy loves his Garmin and his Basecamp. He loves that his comms and his nav and his action cam are three separate systems. I can see his point but it's not for me.
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  18. Turbominivanman

    Turbominivanman Single track anyone?

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    Since I don't really have any experience with using a GPS, it's not like I need to learn a different way to plan my trips. Having said this, it I don't have a preference on what I learn to use, just so long as it is easy. It appears as though there would be a pretty steep learning curve on both the smart phone and the gps, but the smart phone as a GPS seams like it is a shorter learning curve.
    Thanks for such a great breakdown of your thoughts.
    I am pretty sure that I will pull the trigger on a pro, just due to the fact that it has a few more options for a fairly minimal price increase.
  19. Eatmore Mudd

    Eatmore Mudd Mischief on wheels.

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    I hear ya. The learning curve does look steep. But looks can be deceiving.
    I went from befuddled to reliably talking and group texting and web surfing in less than hour. By the end of the week it was smooth and as fast as my dainty little sausage fingers could type. With that out of the way. It's self educate GPS time.

    These threads and YouTube videos are my go to self instruction sources.

    GPS vs Smartphone http://advrider.com/index.php?threads/designated-gps-unit-vs-smart-phone.936814/

    Locus Thread http://advrider.com/index.php?threads/locus.989332/

    A good way to flatten the learning curve is play with this stuff a little bit each day after work to what the shiny knobs and buttons do and use it to get to and from work. Then set aside a day or two on the weekend to use it for real by riding Starbucks or cheeseburger runs that you already know. I was recording a simple track and following it

    And don't forget, it's not realistic for guys like us to as total newbs to compare our speeds and efficiencies when we are just starting out to the Bruce Lee master jedi invisible belt level GPS-ers like ohgood and PDXalamo, comparatively speaking.
  20. Turbominivanman

    Turbominivanman Single track anyone?

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    Whoa whoa whoa!!! You think I ride a GS and make Starbucks runs?!!! Heck no! Hahahaha JK:) I get what you mean. I think that is a great idea! I will implement that after I get setup! Thanks for the tip.
    Eatmore Mudd likes this.