Underboning the World - 2 Symbas, 1 Couple, No Sense

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by Underboning, Aug 16, 2011.

  1. Underboning

    Underboning Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2007
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    745
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    Back in PDX again!
    We have all of our photos (that we have been able to upload so far) at colinandre.smugmug.com, glad you are enjoying them.
  2. Underboning

    Underboning Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2007
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    745
    Location:
    Back in PDX again!
    Up early this morning since I wanted to change the oil in the bikes before we hit the road. Unfortunately the wind was blowing very hard, and the sand and dust storm made the oil change no fun. As an added bonus, I trapped my finger between the wrench and the oil sump, giving myself a humongous blood blister at the tip of my left thumb, which promptly split and bled all over the place. Maintenance done, we hit the road toward Grootfontein, and of course, fought a head wind the entire way. We stopped for lunch and fuel in Grootfontein, where we loaded up our jerrycans for the further 160 mile run to Rundu. From now on, fuel stations will be even farther apart.

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    The ride to Rundu was what we imagined Africa to be. We didn't see another white face until we reached Rundu. All along the road were traditional dwellings and people going about their daily business. Both Re and I could barely lift our left arms by the end of the ride- they were worn out from waving so much! The little kids, especially, seemed to be excited to see us, running toward the road and waving, ofter with both hands as we rode past. Everywhere we stopped to refuel, we drew a small crowd. The only wildlife today were hundreds of cows and goats (mostly in the road).

    We finally rolled into Rundu at around 5:30. We cruised through town to find accommodations, and not seeing anything, reluctantly consulted the Lonely Planet. One recommended place was near the town center, so we headed in that direction. We turned left onto a road made entirely of 3” deep sand, and the recommended guesthouse was another 2.5km down the sand road. Fortunately, 275 meters down the sand road was another guesthouse with camping. Re and I quickly decided to try here and found that in addition to camping, they had a fan bungalow for a reasonable price. Since tomorrow's ride to Katima Mulilo will be over 300 miles, our longest ride in Africa so far, we opted for the bungalow to save the time of striking camp in the morning.

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    After paying for our room we walked back to the bikes, and it was then that I noticed Re's flat rear tire. Yay. As our bungalow was only about 100 yards from reception, we decided to ride to the bungalow slowly and fix the flat there. As I got back on my bike, I thought I smelled burnt oil, looked down, and discovered that in my haste this morning I failed to screw in my oil dipstick all the way. After reaching the bungalow I added oil to my bike and found that it had only lost approximately 150cc's. Hopefully no damage has occurred. Note to self: double check everything. Before Re headed out for food on my bike, she helped me remove the rear wheel from her bike. I am once again glad the Symbas have center stands. We both inspected the tire for a puncture, and neither of us could find one. After she left, I partially dismounted the tire to get to the tube and immediately found the problem. Before I removed the tire, I noticed that the balance mark on the tire was no longer lined up with the valve stem, which seemed odd, because it was aligned when I installed it. Apparently the 7hp of the apocalypse was enough to spin the rear tire on the rim and put a wrinkle in the tube. I never thought I would have needed rim locks on a Symba. I got the patch kit out, glued on a patch, waited a few minutes, and put the wheel back together. I pumped the tire up to 33psi and left it sit overnight to see if the patch held. We are carrying two spare tubes if needed, but I want to save them until they're really needed. As I picked up the tools, Re returned with dinner. So what are we having for dinner tonight, Rebekah? How about, more pies. The local grocery store had few options that could be prepared easily. At least we are eating a lot of fruit to balance out the pies (I like pies. The USA needs more pies). The best part of dinner was watching the sun set over the Kavango River and looking into Angola while we ate on the porch of our bungalow. We both enjoyed a shower before bed to remove the thick layer of dust that covered us.


    210 miles in about 7 hours. Remember to tighten anything you loosen, and we had our first flat tire of the trip.
  3. Underboning

    Underboning Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2007
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    Back in PDX again!
    Ooh, sorry we didn't get a chance to meet. Somehow just about every time we stop for fuel we draw a small crowd, it takes us a long time to get fuel wherever we go. Ion seemed like a fun guy but we (stupidly, it turns out) declined his offer to come to the rally with them. We were also trying to talk to 1NiteOwl at the same time, so it was a little chaotic. We are in Victoria Falls now, heading for Mozambique (probably), so maybe our paths will cross again.
  4. Underboning

    Underboning Been here awhile

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    Back in PDX again!
    She is a tough one, for sure. A week later and she has full mobility back in her shoulder and no pains of any kind. She does have a very large bruise running from her elbow to nearly her wrist, sexy!
  5. Underboning

    Underboning Been here awhile

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    Back in PDX again!
    Our plan for the day was to ride east to Katima Mulilo, our final stop before the border with Botswana. If we made it all the way there today, it would be our longest ride yet in Africa at over 300 miles. As the middle of the ride transited the Bwabwata National Park, there would be a potential for no fuel for nearly 200 of those miles. One way or another it was going to be a long day, so we got up at 6 am. First order of the day was to check the status of my repair job on Re's rear tire. I was very happy to find that the tire held 32 psi overnight, so Re and I quickly reinstalled the rear wheel and then checked the other tires and lubed both chains. Maintenance done, we had a quick breakfast on the front porch of our bungalow and enjoyed the sunrise over the Zambezi River. After showers and once again, loading up the bikes, we were on the road by 7:30.

    We stopped for fuel but didn't completely fill our jerrycans as there was another fuel stop about 125 miles down the road in Divundu. Our constant companion, the Namibian Headwind made another appearance this morning and fought us until lunchtime. We made it to Divundu around 11:30 am and stopped for fuel and lunch. We filled up our tanks, 9 liters in Re's jerrycan, and 5 in mine, which would hopefully get us to Katima Mulilo. The OpenStreetMap GPS maps I downloaded indicated that there was “Fuel (not all the time)” in Kongola, approximately 120 miles east of Divundu, but we didn't want to rely on the chance that they would have fuel. We were heavy. Our lunch choices were limited because Divundu seems to consist of a gas station, small grocery store, bottle shop, and bar. We had leftover droewors and “chilly bites” (dried sausages and spicy meat), half a loaf of bread, and oranges, which we supplemented with sodas and ate straddling our bikes in the shade of the grocery store. While we ate, I noticed that I was able to understand some of the signage in the store window and realized it appeared to be in Spanish. I commented on this, and Re said it must be Portuguese since we were right across the river from Angola, and Portuguese is the official language of Angola.

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    Leaving Divundu, we passed through an agricultural checkpoint staffed by Namibian police force members. Apparently, hoof and mouth disease is a major problem in this region of Africa, and the checkpoint was to help prevent the spread of the disease further into Namibia. While we waited for the arm to be lifted for us to pass, we once again answered many questions about our bikes and the journey. After 5 minutes or so of questions, the sole female officer (who was clearly not impressed) left her booth, walked over to the arm, and lifted it and waved for us to pass, thus ending our conversation and allowing us to ride on. Shortly after entering the park, our eyes lit up when we saw the warning signs that told us to look our for... elephants. We spent the next several hours scanning the roadside for large, gray objects, but to no avail. We did, however, see several different types of antelope and some warthogs. The next several hours passed relatively quickly, the lack of headwind and search for pachyderms made the time fly. We had seen plenty of elephant poop on the roadside, but we began to suspect the signs were a ploy to lure tourists to the area and that the elephant poop was planted by unethical tourism officials. But our patience was rewarded just before we left the park. In my rear view mirror, I saw Rebekah slam on the brakes and turned around to see why. It was then that she pointed out several groups of elephants gathered around the pools in a marshy area next to the road. We stopped, got out the binoculars and camera, and spent about 20 minutes watching elephants do what elephants do. Very cool.

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    At about 4:30, we exited the park and found ourselves in Kongola, another very small village, but lo and behold, there was... a gas station with a big chalk check mark next to the word "Petrol" on the sign out front. We had recently refueled the bikes, emptying Re's jerrycan and using 3 of the 5 liters in mine. We had enough fuel in our tanks to make it to Katima Mulilo but have learned enough to never pass up the opportunity to get fuel. We swung into the station, confirmed that they had unleaded, and got 6 liters in Re's jerrycan. I had to laugh when another attendant came rushing out of the station to see our bikes, and I noticed that he was wearing and obviously counterfeit Orange Crappy Choppers ballcap, those buffoons are everywhere! He appeared excited but a little disappointed to see that we were only riding little bikes. The sun was beginning to set, and we raced it into Katima Mulilo, wanting to honor our pledge to never ride after dark in Africa.

    As we entered Katima, we encountered a veritable flood of people walking toward us. The workday must end at 6 pm, and everyone seemed to be leaving the “downtown.” I smiled as I saw everyone laughing and chatting with each other as they walked, rush hour in the East Caprivi seems much more civilized than in Ft Collins. We made it to downtown Katima at about 6:15 and the sun dipped below the horizon. Lonely Planet came through for us this time, directing us to camp at the Protea Hotel grounds, which is a very swanky hotel with camping on the side for “our kind.” By the time we registered and made our way to the campground it was well after 6:30, so we yanked the camping gear off Re's bike and she headed out in search of the local grocery store for some dinner. We hadn't seen any food stores on the way into town, and here in Africa, most of them seem to close at 7 pm, so the race was on. Fortunately for me, Re was smart enough to stop and ask a guard at the gate where to find the grocery store. He smiled and said, “I will take you there.” He said it was too difficult to explain, and she should just follow him. Since it was nearly 7 and the big stores would be closed, he took her to a small local store with a very limited selection of food options. He apologized but said it was the only thing open at this hour. Re returned with a small bag of potatoes, milk, and (wait for it)... more pies. While I continued to set up camp, she made mashed potatoes and reheated the pies, and we had a reasonable dinner looking out at the moonlight on the Zambezi while the grunting hippos serenaded us. Tummies full and butts barking, we climbed into the tent and fell asleep to the sounds of hippos. Tomorrow - Botswana

    350 miles in almost 11 hours. Re's rear tire patch is holding air.

  6. Underboning

    Underboning Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2007
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    745
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    Back in PDX again!
    Since our ride to Kasane, Botswana would only be around 100 miles today, we were in no hurry to get up this morning and instead, spent some quality snuggling time. Again, the night was cool, but actually a little clammy. The climate is changing, as this is the first humidity we've experienced since South Africa. Crawling out of the tent into the sunlight, we looked down the riverbank and could see crocodiles basking on the river's edge. Not wanting to try and find our way back to the grocery store, we had a breakfast of dry mueslix, fruit, and cowboy coffee. I took a quick look at the bikes while Re started on the tent. All of the vitals were good on the bikes, but the rear tires are getting very thin. I am trying to milk them as long as we can. It would be best if these rear tires last long enough that our other Michelin Gazelles could get us to India. I really don't want to have to put our locally sourced, plasticky front tires on the rear of our bikes.

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    The ride to the border was brief, only taking about an hour. The border crossing itself was very easy and very professional, especially on the Botswana side. The total cost for both bikes was about 31USD; that amount included road tax and 90 days of mandatory liability insurance.

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    Before we reached the border post on the Botswana side, we had to stop for a hoof and mouth disease control station. We both had to get off our bikes and do a little dance on a wet towel in a basin before riding our bikes through a 9” deep pool of dirty water. Maybe it will help prevent the spread of hoof and mouth disease, or maybe the guards just videotape it to laugh at later. Either way, it was our second water splash in Africa. Once the final paper was stamped, fee was paid, and gate was lifted, we rode into Botswana- our fifth country so far.

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    We found ourselves on the A33 that is the transit road through Chobe National Park. As usual, motorcycles are not allowed in national parks in Botswana,(something about lions or leopards), but we were allowed to ride through on the public road.

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    We had planned on taking an organized safari tomorrow, but this ride turned into a safari all its own. In the next two hours, we saw numerous elephants, including one group of at least twenty within 50 feet of the road's edge.

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    We also saw zebras, baboons, giraffes, warthogs, several types of antelope, and at least ten different species of birds in all colors of the rainbow. Since we didn't refuel the bikes before entering Chobe, we both found our fuel lights blinking at us before we exited the park. I was a little nervous about stopping to refuel because we would have to shut off the engines and consequently, wouldn't be able to run away. We were climbing a hill about 5 miles before the park exit when Re's bike coughed, and mine would no longer accelerate. We were out of gas. We jumped off the bikes, grabbed the jerrycan, and quickly put some fuel in each bike, all the time looking over our shoulders for predators. I told Re she was absolutely not allowed to be calling, “here, kitty kitty,” and yet, she still did.

    We made our way into Kasane and headed for the campground that another traveler had recommended to us. My moment of ignominy came as we pulled into the campground. We just cleared the security gate when I became confused about where we needed to turn, grabbed the front brake, not realizing that the driveway was made up of 3” of fine sand. Once again, the laws of physics took over. The front wheel snapped right, I tried in vain to save it, and found myself face down in the sand. With the help of the rather startled looking guard, we picked up my bike and thankfully found no damage. I'm beginning to notice a pattern: Rebekah goes down, then I go down. She's really going to have to stop crashing. This campground was mostly frequented by the big safari trucks which would take up a whole group site each, but we were able to find a corner of one of the group sites for the night. Since it was before 2pm when we arrived, we decided to take the afternoon off and catch up on some personal maintenance. Re gave me a quick haircut, and we both showered before heading back into town for food and a trip to the ATM. Where we used to live in eastern Oregon, we had mule deer that would walk through town, but here in Kasane, they have warthogs. Riding down the main street, I came within about 6” of slapping a warthog on the ass as he lazily wandered in traffic. Later that afternoon we booked our early morning game drive and afternoon river cruise. We spent the rest of the evening doing laundry, relaxing in the pool, and cooking dinner.


    90 miles in about 4 hours, with an international border crossing and lots of stopping for animals. Bikes are running fine, with the exception of a quick nap.
  7. CDNbiker

    CDNbiker Lost in Space

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    Toronto, ON
    I'm really enjoying following you guys. It's like reading an adventure novel. I look forward to each new post. Sounds like the bikes are holding up well dispute the few minor problems you have had - how many miles do you have on them now?
  8. rich223vt

    rich223vt n00b

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    Great R/R, guys! Like a good book you are hard to put down.
    Sorry 'bout those rude bikers in SA. I guess they're everywhere.
    Safe travels.
    Rubber down.
    Rw
  9. Ivyleague

    Ivyleague Been here awhile

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    Dizzyland
    Great writing style and amazingly bold:norton - Thanks for taking the time to share...........
  10. Underboning

    Underboning Been here awhile

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    Jul 31, 2007
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    745
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    Back in PDX again!
    we have about 8900 miles on them now. We started with about 500 on each, so we've done about 8400 miles this trip. I anticipate about another 3000 (hopefully trouble-free) miles to get to Mombasa, Kenya where we plan to put the bikes on a boat for India. The question we get asked most often here in Africa is why didn't we do this on big bikes and my reply is that if we brought big bikes we'd be pretty much guaranteed to make it - on these it's an adventure!
  11. Circle Blue

    Circle Blue Here and There

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2009
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    Middle of the USA
    Indeed the bikes do add some spice and some uncertainty, I mean adventure, to the ride.
  12. GlennRides

    GlennRides Adventurer

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    Phlippines
    You guys are unbelievable this is a real adventure. Ride safe guys :clap:clap:clap
  13. vintagespeed

    vintagespeed fNg

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    truly wonderful journey, thanks for bringing us along.
  14. Underboning

    Underboning Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2007
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    745
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    Back in PDX again!
    Except for a quick run to the grocery store in the afternoon, there was no riding today. Instead, we got up at 5am to go on a game drive in Chobe National Park. 5:00 am is way too early to get up on any other day, but today it was worth it. After splashing some water on our faces and brushing our teeth, we assembled at the pool and bar to wait for our ride. Our guide arrived in a large, 4-wheel drive truck that had several rows of open seats where the bed would be. Before we left the campsite, Re grabbed her fleece and asked me if I wanted mine. I said no, we're in Africa (forgetting once again how cold it has been so far). It was only about a 20 minute drive to the park entrance, and I spent the entire time wishing I had brought my fleece and contemplating the irony of hypothermia in Africa. Once we entered the park, the driver hopped out and locked the front hubs before proceeding onto the deep sand tracks that crisscross the park.

    [​IMG]

    The first animals we came across were elephants and impalas. As the morning went on, we also saw giraffes, warthogs, banded mongooses, fish eagles, and a variety of other birds.
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    The highlights of the morning were catching a glimpse of the rare wild dog, seeing a leopard sleeping in a tree, and coming upon four lionesses basking in the sun.

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    Our guide explained that there were perhaps only 13 lions left in the park and that their numbers continue to decrease. We felt very privileged to see these beautiful animals in their natural habitat. The entire trip was only about 4 hours, but Re and I arrived back at camp absolutely overwhelmed by what we had seen.


    As the group campsite the previous night in had been reserved by one of the big safari trucks, we had to move to another campsite. The reception office gave us our choice of two possible sites, but a security guard suggested that one was much better than the other. We moved our gear and tent to the suggested site and were very pleasantly surprised to find that our new site was huge and less than 100 feet from the Chobe River's edge. While we were setting up in our new site, Christel (a solo female backpacker from Rouen, France, who is taking a year to travel around the world) stopped by with her leaking Thermarest pad. We used our Big Agnes pad repair kit to fix the leak, and while we were doing so, the security guard stopped by to chat. We thanked him for recommending the site, and that was when he mentioned that most nights there are hippos and elephants on the riverbank by our site. We were hopeful but a little skeptical that we might see something good tonight. We spent the rest of the afternoon taking it easy before our afternoon boat ride.

    We left the camp again at 3:30 and took a short truck ride to the boat dock, where we boarded a large pontoon boat and shoved off. The chance to see such amazing wildlife in their natural environment is such a treat to Re and I that we were disappointed when we saw that some of our companions had obviously come from one of the safari trucks and were lugging a 60-quart or larger cooler with them. Now, Re and I are all about having a beer or two, but it seems like many of the people who travel in the safari trucks are drunk most of the time. Fortunately, they were well-behaved and quiet for most of the trip.

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    Over the next 3 hours we got to get up close and personal with hippos, elephants, crocodiles, and water buffaloes. We also saw impalas, water bucks, red lweche, warthogs, and dozens more different species of birds.

    [​IMG]

    Our boat must have gotten a little too close to some of the hippos, because at one point we felt a large bang on the bottom of the boat. Our guide explained that hippos are very territorial and will strike boats from below in an attempt to overturn them. He went on to explain that the hippo then bites the boaters, killing them, but then leaves them for the crocodiles. He assured us that we were completely safe in such a large boat. Some people kind of smiled at this story, but hippos actually are responsible for more human deaths in Africa than any other animal. A little while later, we pulled away from another pod of hippos and were pursued by one of them who actually porpoised out of the water, snapping its jaws at the boat. It was one of the most incredible sights I have ever witnessed.

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    Another cool experience was to see a group of elephants wading across the river to one of the many islands. When they exited the water, they were still dusty gray on the top but black where the water washed away the dust.

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    But perhaps the very best experience was seeing a very young baby elephant rolling in the river with its mom and aunties. The baby elephant still had some pink coloration around its face and head and was squatting to drink instead of using its trunk. Our guide said that it may only be 3 or 4 days old, as they soon learn to drink with their trunks. Through the binoculars, Re could see that its umbilical cord hadn't fallen off yet. The little guy (or girl) sure seemed to be having fun rolling in the mud. Again, we felt very privileged to see such sights.


    Later at camp, Re and I had dinner at the lodge and talked about the day's events. We both were having a hard time processing everything we'd seen that day. We've been to a lot of zoos and seen most of these animals in captivity, but there is something magical about seeing them in the wild. Instead of being a display of hippos, then a display of elephants, then a display of birds, here it was fascinating to see them all together and interacting with one another.

    [​IMG]

    Perhaps the picture I will remember the most was watching the sun set over the river and the islands, with a herd of elephants silhouetted on the horizon, surrounded by dust.


    But wait! The night got even better! After dinner, we walked back to our campsite and heard branches breaking somewhere in the dark. We walked to the edge of the campsite, and just beyond the electric fence were elephants. A small herd of 8- 10 elephants of various sizes were working their way down the riverbank less than 50 ft from where we stood. At one point, some idiot turned on his flashlight, and one of the elephants turned and walked toward the source of the light with ears held wide and trunk out. Fortunately for Mr Flashlight, it turned away before it reached the fence. After this the elephants moved further down the bank, but we could hear their occasional trumpeting. Worn out, we went to bed.

    6 miles, the rear tires are really very thin.

  15. Underboning

    Underboning Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2007
    Oddometer:
    745
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    Back in PDX again!
    Having not slept very much in anticipation of our safari the previous day, we were both very tired and slept really well. The sun finally kicked us out of bed around 7 am. Today's ride was going to be a short one, so we weren't in any particular hurry to get on the road. The Zimbabwe border was only about 10 miles away, and Victoria Falls 35 miles beyond that. We had coffee and some breakfast and chatted with some of our fellow campers. One of them had some potentially worrying news. They had taken a minibus from the campground to Victoria Falls the previous day, and when they were in immigrations had seen a sign that said, “effective November 2010, no more foreign vehicles would be allowed across the border.” Huh?!? She seemed pretty sure of it, but this was news to us. I asked at reception if they knew anything about it, and they said as far as they knew, foreign vehicles could cross the border, but I should check with one of the drivers of the many safari trucks. As I walked out of reception, I saw what turned out to be the last of the safari trucks pulling out the front gate. We decided to head for the Zimbabwe border anyway, knowing that the ferry to Zambia is less than 10km from the Zimbabwe border crossing.

    [​IMG]

    During the short ride to Kazungula, I spotted a big adventure bike heading our way. I flagged down the couple on it and asked them if they knew anything about the border situation. They had been to the border and were under the impression that they could get through but were heading into Kasane, Botswana, to find a bank and the requisite USD. Feeling more positive, we continued to the border, where I was assured at Botswana Customs that everything would be fine on the Zim side. Again, the Botswana side was very professional and efficient, the Zim side... not so much. The issue with no foreign vehicles turned out to be a prohibition on simply transiting vehicles through the country, they now have to be loaded on a truck - tourists are still OK. Once it was finally our turn at the immigration window, we had some good laughs with the guys working there. For some reason, they were “suspicious” that Re might be a spy and that I was a criminal of some sort. I assured them that no, I was not a criminal, I was in fact, an attorney. This elicited even bigger laughs, as they assured me that attorneys are the biggest criminals of all, but they still let us in. Then to the Customs line. After waiting for 3 commercial truckers to get their loads cleared, I handed our Carnet paperwork to the rather sullen looking Customs official. He did not appear very happy to see all the paperwork that we would be creating for him. He finally cracked a smile when we got to discussing the bikes. He was filling out the liability insurance screen on his computer when he asked me for the engine size. “100cc,” I said. “1000cc,” he said. “No, 100cc.” He said, “100cc?!?” I pointed to the bikes out the window, and he smiled and kind of chuckled. As he continued to work on our paperwork, he also asked why the small bikes? I explained that on big bikes it would be too easy. He thought it was very funny that I would want to make it harder. We both left with a smile, and I then encountered the big bike riders from across the border. They were a couple from Germany, who were riding a DR800 with a way too loud exhaust. I let them know how much things should cost and was on my way.

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    Back at the bikes, I found Re chatting with a commercial truck driver who also was sure that some day Re would tire of her bike and want to sell it to him at a good price. Shades of our grocery store encounter in Mariental. We were waved around the queue of trucks and headed for the final gate, where we spent another 10 minutes chatting about the bikes, the cost and fuel economy, and our trip. The gate then went up, and we were through. It was about an hour's ride into Victoria Falls and our accommodations for the night.

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    We arrived at about 1:30pm, set up our tent, and got to work changing the rear tires. After 3350 miles, I could still, if I held my tongue just right, hook a fingernail in the center groove of both rear tires, but they had to go. So we found a concrete pad, got out the tarp, and got to work. Start to finish, it took us about an hour and a half to change both rear tires, and it probably would have taken less time without the “help” from a local. For one reason or another, Re and I have had the rear wheels off enough times to know the drill, and the extra hands always seem to be in the way. From here we have about 3000 miles to Mombasa, so hopefully, these Gazelles will make it all the way. As we were finishing the tire change, we ran into a fellow traveler, Sue, from Darwin, Australia, and she invited us for a beer and a chat once we were finished. Never ones to turn down beverages and a chat, we got cleaned up and met her at the bar. We spent much of the rest of the evening chatting over pizza and beers before heading to bed.


    56 miles in about 3 hours, including and international border crossing. Single entry visas were 30USD p/p, and 46USD for fees and liability insurance for each bike.
  16. Underboning

    Underboning Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2007
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    745
    Location:
    Back in PDX again!
    We are now sitting in an internet cafe in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe and will be heading for Harare tomorrow. The internet here is reasonably fast and I have been able to upload some more photos to our smugmug account. i have also gone back and added some photos to the posts from 10/4 The Run to Rundu onwards. Be sure to note the lack of any type of fencing between Re and the elephant!
  17. RxZ

    RxZ Legal Drug Dealer

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    Tyler, TX
    Once in Mombasa, I know a missionary that has been in the area for a while that may be able to help with transportation for the bikes across to India. Not a sure thing, but I could forward you his e-mail if you want. Just PM me.

    Oh, and very nice trip so far! Keep wasting that education!

    RxZ
  18. bikerfish

    bikerfish flyfishandride

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    Location:
    western pa
    WOW!!! what a great ride your having! so glad I stumbled across your thread, I'm definetly going to be following you. ride safe and keep the great reporting coming to us!
  19. GlennRides

    GlennRides Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2010
    Oddometer:
    51
    Location:
    Phlippines
    :clap:clap:clap enjoy it guys and ride safe.
  20. Underboning

    Underboning Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2007
    Oddometer:
    745
    Location:
    Back in PDX again!
    Added a few more photos to the Chobe and Zim border crossing posts. Heading for Tete, Mozambique tomorrow and then to Lake Malawi the following day. More soon!